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replacing 5 year old Optoma HD8000 need some direction


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#21 of 51 schan1269

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Posted February 08 2013 - 05:00 PM

Nobody likes the 100u in a light controlled room, cause the contrast isn't high enough. So, if the room is dark, there is your excuse to pony up for the 7000.

#22 of 51 Jim Mcc

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Posted February 08 2013 - 06:40 PM

The room is only dark at night he said. I wouldn't spend the extra money unless the ambient light problem was solved. OR the majority of the viewing is at night.

#23 of 51 schan1269

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Posted February 09 2013 - 12:23 AM

I know that is what he said... On Amazon(for me...cause you know Amazon often shows different people, different pricing) the 7000 was $2049. The 100U was $1300. $750...no way I wouldn't get the 7000.

#24 of 51 nick0814

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Posted February 09 2013 - 02:56 AM

I think any would be a huge increase from my 1300 lumens and 10,000:1 I'm use to but I also get what you are saying. $750 get one with much better contrast but the 100 is much brighter than the 7000 wouldn't that be better for times with more light? I also know that the 7000 is much brighter than my old optoma and it was sufficient at 90% of the time. unless we had the blinds open.

#25 of 51 schan1269

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Posted February 09 2013 - 03:34 AM

There are more things here to consider...keeping in mind I'm at the "extreme" end for what I'll do for audio and video performance. Personally, I don't think there is such a thing as "one screen for night and day". And even at the further extreme...I don't think there is one projector for night and day. For those customers of mine that demand utmost "perfection" in a room where the best you'll attain is maybe 80% perfection(and that "perfection" is according to whom?), I've set up dual screen and dual projector...with a plasma/LCD. Yes....three ways to watch in the same room. Why? Maybe the client has an enormous room and wants to "game" a lot. Gaming and "pure home theatre" don't mix. So, they get a LCD to game. The room is open and they want a projector. So they get a white high gain screen and a "torch" projector. When night falls they switch to another darker, better contrast projector on a low gain gray screen. My last project required two projectors for an entirely different reason. A couple with kids and the need for an enormous screen(140") and they also wanted a more "intimate" sizing area for when they wanted to watch by themselves. Two projectors...for two different sizes. You'll have the option here to calibrate two projectors with two screens...if you wish to get extreme.

#26 of 51 nick0814

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Posted February 09 2013 - 06:05 AM

When the time comes and I build on and make a dedicated theater room I will do just that. But for now I guess if I had to choose I'd say I'd opt for a better daytime projector and I'd assume that it would still be significantly better than my previous Optoma? right? If I went with the 100 I'm assuming it would be super bright and great day time projector, I also thought it would give me a great night picture? But if I was to spend the extra money on the 7000 and its 700 lumens greater than my old projector, with a huge contrast ratio difference.. just wondering if I'd be happier with this setup because its still brighter I'm assuming day time use would be much greater than my old one, and I'm sure night viewing would be amazing? kind of my issue right now, save the money buy a brighter projector that will be great for day use and still better than what I'm use to at night.. or spend some extra money and get a good day use with an amazing night use.... opinions!????

#27 of 51 Jim Mcc

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Posted February 09 2013 - 11:31 AM

Nick, there's no such thing as a "great day time projector" if you have ambient light. Black levels and contrast are always going to suffer if there is ambient light. The only way to solve this is to take care of the ambient light problem. If you can't or won't, then buy the brighter projector. And don't choose a projector based on the manufacturer's CLAIMED contrast specs because they are meaningless, exaggerated BS. The only contrast spec that matters is the ANSI contrast(after calibration). Sometimes it's quoted in the reviews, with 500:1 to 600:1 considered very good. No, that's not a typo. What is your ambient light problem anyway? Can't you use curtains, blinds, etc? And why no DLP projector choices? Is the majority of your viewing in daytime or at night?

#28 of 51 schan1269

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Posted February 09 2013 - 12:44 PM

By the way...I never said... "Great daytime projector" What I did say is two projectors...each maximized for the time of day to use them. That does not mean "great daytime projector". Using two projectors is not a new idea either. Back when anamorphic made a mess when trying to watch standard television...lots of people used two projectors.

#29 of 51 Type A

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Posted February 09 2013 - 01:35 PM

Given the choice Id rather use two different screens than two different projectors. Newer model JVC projectors (perhaps other manufactures, I dont know) have "lens memory" that saves zoom focus and shift into one of three profiles, makes changing screens/aspects quick and painless. Heck you could use a high gain screen for day and a high contrast screen for night. Granted high gain screens come with some viewing angle and install limitations but its still a possible venture :D
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#30 of 51 Jim Mcc

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Posted February 09 2013 - 01:40 PM

By the way...I never said... "Great daytime projector"

I never said you did. :confused: I was quoting Nick. 2 different projectors. I love that. :) Nick, all you have to do is use one of the projector's preset modes for night viewing, and one for daytime viewing. Most projectors allow 3 or more preset modes. Mine has 3. Or go nuts, and have a third one for cloudy afternoons.

#31 of 51 schan1269

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Posted February 09 2013 - 01:48 PM

I never said you did. :confused: I was quoting Nick.

My bad...half asleep...did car work today...may go to bed...Sacrilege on a Saturday night to turn in by 9...

#32 of 51 nick0814

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Posted February 11 2013 - 03:25 AM

my light issue isn't really all that bad. the window in the room has a blind and the window itself has also been tinted with 5% limo car tint. the next room has a sliding glass door with a blind as well and I'm thinking about tinting that one as well but not as dark. with doing that my light issue will be almost non existent except for really sunny days and that only is an issue couple hours out of the day. I'm open for any projector really. Just from the research I've done and the amount I want to spend is why I've narrowed it down to the Panasonic 100 and 7000, I'm not set on those and would gladly go with something else. With that being said do you have some makes or models you think I should consider??

#33 of 51 schan1269

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Posted February 11 2013 - 08:04 AM

LG(the lost step-child in the LCoS/D-ILA scene). Any DLP projector.

#34 of 51 Jim Mcc

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Posted February 11 2013 - 10:48 AM

Nick, is the throw distance still 12' to 14' ? Screen size still 90" diagonal? Do you need lens shift?

#35 of 51 nick0814

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Posted February 11 2013 - 12:51 PM

I didn't purposely choose LCD just what I come up with when looking at high lumen high contrast ratio projectors in my price range distance from projector mount to screen is 12' 6" and the current screen is 43" x 73.5" not to sound ignorant but I don't know what a lens shift is? the projector is tight to the ceiling if thats what you mean

#36 of 51 schan1269

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Posted February 11 2013 - 01:42 PM

Lens shift allows you to move the entire screen up and own(vertical, and most common) and left/right(not as common) to make mounting easier...and means a projector is more likely able to move with you instead of being left behind in the house.

#37 of 51 nick0814

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Posted February 11 2013 - 01:49 PM

thats what it sounded like.. my projector was about the same height as the top of my screen so I guess it does have some lens shift..

#38 of 51 schan1269

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Posted February 11 2013 - 02:00 PM

The HD8000 does not have lens shift. I don't think it has Keystone either.

#39 of 51 Jim Mcc

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Posted February 11 2013 - 03:28 PM

I didn't purposely choose LCD just what I come up with when looking at high lumen high contrast ratio projectors in my price range distance from projector mount to screen is 12' 6" and the current screen is 43" x 73.5" not to sound ignorant but I don't know what a lens shift is? the projector is tight to the ceiling if thats what you mean

That's an odd size. 41" X 73" = 84" diagonal. Is 84" diagonal(16:9) the screen size you want then? How far below the ceiling is the top of your screen?

#40 of 51 nick0814

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Posted February 12 2013 - 01:06 PM

about 14-16 inches.. I was going to get a bigger screen but when they installed the projector thats the biggest picture it would do without being further away and thats where both walls were..




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