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Mounting metal shelf brackets over drywall


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7 replies to this topic

#1 of 8 Jim Mcc

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Posted January 21 2013 - 12:05 PM

I'm referring to the flat metal 90 degree brackets. When you install them, do you put a piece of wood between it and the drywall? Or do you screw them right over the drywall? I'm asking because i've had to remove these in the past, and the drywall seems to get damaged(probably from tightening a little too much). Thanks.

#2 of 8 Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Posted January 22 2013 - 10:20 AM

Well, the wood would have to be screwed into the drywall, too. There’s no escaping damage to the drywall of some sort if you screw something into it, then remove it. That seems painfully obvious, so I have to wonder if maybe I’m not getting your point? Regards, Wayne A. Pflughaupt
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#3 of 8 Jim Mcc

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Posted January 22 2013 - 11:49 AM

It seems that the brackets get "sucked" into the drywall, compressing it, and breaking the paper surface because the metal is so thin. About 1/16" maybe. I saw somewhere where the person used a 1X2 between the drywall and bracket.

#4 of 8 Sam Posten

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Posted January 24 2013 - 04:00 AM

I recommend using anchors not screws. These kits from Home Depot rock: http://www.homedepot...51#.UQFofGdZNuI

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#5 of 8 Jim Mcc

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Posted January 24 2013 - 07:39 AM

Sam, I don't need anchors. I'm screwing into the studs.

#6 of 8 Sam Posten

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Posted January 24 2013 - 08:22 AM

OK, that changes it slightly but: I suggest you jettison the need to drill directly into the studs by using anchors instead. This will simplify your setup AND avoid the potential further damage you are worried about to the drywall by the screws getting sucked in.

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#7 of 8 schan1269

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Posted January 24 2013 - 09:09 AM

Or use these... http://www.wall-nut.com/ I always forget what these things are called....but the double flange you put in the wall as a "nut" and twist the bolt in...what are those called?...these things...(found them) http://www.amazon.co...ds=toggle bolts

#8 of 8 Bobofbone

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Posted January 24 2013 - 11:49 AM

I don't consider myself an expert in this, but I think there are a couple of things to consider. How much weight are you going to be supporting? If the shelves are mainly for decorative use, and there won't be much weight on them, something that anchors into drywall would probably work. However, if you are planning on putting something on the shelves that either weighs alot or costs alot, you need something that gives whatever you screw into sufficient pull out strength to hold it, like an underlying stud. Think about those force diagrams from your physics classes. The load that is on a point in the surface of the drywall will also depend on how much force is pushing, and on how much the area is. Something wider than your bracket that the bracket sits on or is secured to will provide a greater area, and less force on a given point. If you move it, you would be more likely to have holes to patch (easier) than dents to fill around holes to patch. And yes, I have slept at a Holiday Inn Express.




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