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newbie question re: SVS cylinder sub placements in theater room


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#1 of 18 nystad

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Posted January 06 2013 - 10:22 AM

I am hoping someone can lend a hand w/ a basic question related to sub placement. I recently posted a question relating to sub recommendations and ended up finally going with two SVS 12 NSD cylinder subs. I am eager to get everything tweaked and send back a full review to everyone (hopefully will help others although I am not too knowledgeable when it comes to audio knowledge). Anyway, my setup is a 25x15' theater room with main level 8' ceiling, small stage (laminate), 103' projector screen and total of 3 level seating at 6' step-ups. The minor issue I have not is that my space on stage is a little crammed for the cylinder speakers to set in front, one in each corner. It may very well work it I simply raise up the screen 4-5" but not sure yet. In that scenario, each speaker will be nearly touching the corner walls, sort of jammed in the corners. I think that will end up working but wanted to get someone's opinion on what would be optimal. So choices are to keep each up in front, raising the screen so that the top of speakers are nearly flush w/ screen. Or, maybe one speaker in the front left corner and another positioned anywhere else such as back left or back right. Or, I could wire so that both are in back corners. (not sure if that will be a little annoying for others given proximity of soft to sub?). Any difference if subs sit on laminate stage vs. carpeting? Basically, looking for optimal positioning for a 25x15' standard rectangle theater room. Better to have specific inches of speaker to wall, better to keep both on one wall, vs diagonal, etc.... I am guessing this is a pretty dumb, basic question but any help would be appreciated. Sound number one, aesthetics secondary. (I am hoping wife will go for this). Again, I will be sure to send a full write-up including my interactions with SVS customer help. thanks!

#2 of 18 schan1269

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Posted January 06 2013 - 11:51 AM

We have no clue what your "optimal positioning" is. Basically it is a combination of trial and error. You might end up with one sitting inside your right or left main speaker and the other one 1/3rd the way down one of the walls towards seating.

#3 of 18 Robert_J

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Posted January 06 2013 - 01:47 PM

Any difference if subs sit on laminate stage vs. carpeting?

No. Room placement varies based on room geometry, seating location, furnishing, etc. What works for me may be a terrible recommendation for you. That said, I put my subs in front under the center channel. I like symmetry in my layout. Try it and measure. Corner loading works as well. If you have trouble placing the subs vertical, you can lay them down. Orientation makes no difference.

#4 of 18 nystad

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Posted January 07 2013 - 01:08 AM

Thanks. I'll probably just start with vertical front left and front right and see how they perform.

#5 of 18 schan1269

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Posted January 07 2013 - 02:11 AM

Give them plenty of time to break in as well. If you can shut off the rest of your speaker and just run the sub, do that to hasten its break in. SVS should have a "break in time allotment" in the manual.

#6 of 18 nystad

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Posted January 07 2013 - 10:59 AM

Will do. Thanks.

#7 of 18 nystad

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Posted January 09 2013 - 07:12 AM

So here is my newbie, uneducated review of my new SVS subs. two cylinder nsd 12's in theater room 25x15'. Denon incommand 3313ci receiver. 7 surround pinnacle in wall speakers, don't know models. removed the in subs i had previously which were 2 subCompact 6 dual firing subs placed into the wall, vented via grills. First, customer service was great. Very smart guys willing to answer all questions, etc. Tweaked it w/ the audysey in Denon receiver but also w/ SVS support. Best I can tell, its tweaked best possible for the room. Both subs are in front stage separated by about 6'. Recommended sub settings including gain to about 1/3-1/2 on each. Rest of speakers set to small. First, I noticed obvious fast, low powerful base in movies i had been missing. I expected this and its solid. I have no idea how this compares to other more/less expensive good subs but i'm happy w/ this. What I miss a bit is the "mid base" for a better word that the pinnacles did contribute. I also now notice that w/ music, tv, movies w/o much action, etc. the base is often quite absent or very minimal. At times, I wish I had much more of the mid range bases I am used to hearing even while watching a football game, playing music, and even some portions of action movies. Its possible some element is my ear that needs retrained although I am pretty sure that if I was able to incorporate my pinnacles back into the mix w/o conflicting/bringing down the svs base sound, that might be perfection. Or at least to my untrained ears, taste. Im told I could "daisy chain" the pinnacles into the SVS via line level output? Anyone have an opinion on this? Overall, they do sound great when I hear them and feel them and i'm now hearing and feeling quick, tight low base i've never heard b/f. I just feel like a little more mid type base would sound perfect to me. thanks

#8 of 18 Dave Upton

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Posted January 09 2013 - 07:26 AM

The sound you're describing is either room gain on the bottom end, or a null at the midbass range - or some combination thereof.


I reviewed the SVS Legato last year and found that having the subs in diagonally opposite corners of the room gave the best response. Your mileage may vary of course, but I would try having one in the front and one behind per Toole's research to see if that makes a difference.


#9 of 18 Brainwasher

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Posted January 09 2013 - 07:31 AM

You could run a splitter from each sub output off the back of the denon. This would allow you to run up to 4 subs. Setup would be fun, I wish I had your issues. Also first check your frequency on the back of the subs, and in your Audysey menu.

#10 of 18 nystad

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Posted January 09 2013 - 07:38 AM

Thanks. I did run through frequencies for all speakers and subs. It was set as recommended by the SVS technician who sounded like a genius to me. Would running a splitter from each sub output be better than running from SVS sub to pinnacle? I am not sure I can not run anything more from receiver to subs as this wiring was all put in place b/f home was built last year and the receiver is about 20 feet away in another room. I'll have to ask the audio guy who designed I guess.

#11 of 18 schan1269

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Posted January 09 2013 - 07:43 AM

Well...it may be "too soon" for the SVS(fully broken in?)... But...you could use the Pinnacle subs in a MBM role(HSU makes a MBM specific "woofer")... But yeah, you more than likely have a null that..."better placement" or "more break-in" will cure. If you are still lacking "mid bass"...using a crossover to blend the SVS with the Sub-Compact6(forget the actual name) might be a worthwhile endeavor....(you could always buy one from Amazon and return it...) http://www.amazon.co...inger crossover (I've not read the manual on this one...you would need to buy one where you can set the crossover as low as 40hz...and no higher than 60hz)

#12 of 18 nystad

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Posted January 09 2013 - 08:04 AM

I did ask SVS about "break-in". They tell me there is no break-in on their subs and I should not expect any discernible changes with continued use.

#13 of 18 schan1269

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Posted January 09 2013 - 08:14 AM

I did ask SVS about "break-in". They tell me there is no break-in on their subs and I should not expect any discernible changes with continued use.

Really? Granted I've never owned a SVS anything...but really? Then I suggest moving them to remove the null...if that doesn't work...MBM the Compact6.

#14 of 18 nystad

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Posted January 09 2013 - 08:18 AM

That's what they tell me. I asked since multiple people on this board had brought it up. I don't really have ability to move the subs but I will probably try adding the compact 6's back into the mix and see what happens. I guess no real downside then. At least tv shows will have some base again which again, may be more my taste then what "should" be. thanks again

#15 of 18 schan1269

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Posted January 09 2013 - 08:21 AM

There is always this... http://www.dspeaker....mode-8033.shtml

#16 of 18 Robert_J

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Posted January 09 2013 - 10:33 AM

You need to measure your in-room response to see if you have a null at your listening position. The cheapest route is an older, analog Radio Shack SPL meter, a test tone disc that you can make for free and this spreadsheet http://www.pvconsult...udio/eq/peq.htm

#17 of 18 schan1269

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Posted January 09 2013 - 10:49 AM

You need to measure your in-room response to see if you have a null at your listening position. The cheapest route is an older, analog Radio Shack SPL meter, a test tone disc that you can make for free and this spreadsheet http://www.pvconsult...udio/eq/peq.htm

To add to that...(I've not used what Robert linked...so I can't tell you which is more usefull) http://www.audiocheck.net/ (these guys has a sweep designed for a specific SPL meter...and they tell you which one)

#18 of 18 Robert_J

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Posted January 09 2013 - 10:55 AM

The correction values for the analog SPL meter are built into that spreadsheet. If you go with a different SPL meter you will get different (as in not as accurate) results. Room EQ Wizard is another option but that requires more hardware and has a steeper learning curve. I like PEQ because it allows you to simulate a Behringer Feedback Destroyer in your system. After measuring my room, making the EQ changes in the software, entering those changes into the BFD and re-measuring, the results were exactly as the software predicted.




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