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The David O. Selznick Collection Blu-Ray review



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#1 of 20 OFFLINE   MatthewA

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Posted December 21 2012 - 09:25 AM

David O. Selznick left behind a legacy of handsomely mounted, literate films that pushed the limits of production values in a then-young art form called the motion picture. Kino’s The David O. Selznick Collection box set traces the producer’s career over a five-year period with these previously released editions of five of his films: Bird of Paradise, A Farewell to Arms, Little Lord Fauntleroy, A Star is Born and Nothing Sacred.





The David O. Selznick Collection: Bird of Paradise (1932), A Farewell to Arms (1932), Little Lord Fauntleroy (1936), A Star is Born (1937), Nothing Sacred (1937)

Studio: Kino (originally produced by either RKO, Paramount or Selznick International Pictures)

Year: 1932/1932/1936/1937/1937

Rated: NR

Length: 82/89/102/111/73 Minutes

Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1

Resolution: 1080p

Languages: English 2.0 Mono

Subtitles: None

MSRP: $99.95

Film Release Dates: September 13, 1932/December 8/April 2, 1936/April 27, 1937/November 25, 1937

Disc Release Date: November 13, 2012

Review Date: December 9, 2012



The Movies:


The Golden Age of Hollywood may not have glittered as brightly had it not been for David O. Selznick. While the majority of modern moviegoers are likely to associate his name with Gone with the Wind, his 1939 magnum opus that remains his most popular and enduring film, it couldn’t have been possible without a prior track record of successful films. In five years, he worked his way up the ladder in Hollywood, to become the Head of Production at RKO, followed by a two-year stint with his own unit at MGM (whose boss, Louis B. Mayer, was his father-in-law). In 1935, his drive for higher production values and a desire for autonomy led him to start his own studio, Selznick International Pictures. This five-film box set traces his career from his RKO days to his initial success as an independent producer.


Bird of Paradise (1932)

3.5/5


Johnny Baker (Joel McCrea) is a young man sailing to a Polynesian island with his friends (John Halliday, Richard Gallagher, Bert Roach, Lon Chaney, Jr.). As the men throw gifts to natives swimming in the water, Johnny spots a shark and tries to scare it away with a hook, but he slips and falls into the water. When Luana (Dolores del Rio), the beautiful daughter of the King (Napoleon Pukui), saves Johnny’s life, they fall in love only to learn her father has betrothed her to a prince. During their wedding, Johnny appears at the last minute to take Luana to another island. However, what seems like an idyllic life in this new surroundings may not last.


Efficiently directed by King Vidor, the film is a compelling pre-code melodrama with an exotic island setting that benefits from location shooting on Catalina Island and Hawaii. Joel McCrea and Dolores del Rio are an appealing enough couple, and though the film’s subject matter handles the lovers’ cultural differences with respect, merely being made in an era when interracial romance was, as one of the l. Benefiting from being made prior to 1934 allowed King Vidor to suggest nudity without actually showing it, leaving it to the viewers’ imaginations. Max Steiner’s score utilizes tropical motifs effectively. The film’s biggest set piece is an exciting whirlpool sequence that still holds up in the face of 80 years of technical improvements. Unfortunately, the film barely made back its $752,000 budget.


A Farewell to Arms (1932)

4/5


Lt. Frederic Henry (Gary Cooper) is an American ambulance driver for the Italian Army on the front lines of WWI. While he and a friend, Major Rinaldi (Adolphe Menjou), are caught in a bombing raid, they take shelter with a British nurse named Catherine Barkley (Helen Hayes). After Rinaldi and Frederic go on a double date with Catherine and Helen Ferguson (Mary Phillips), respectively, Catherine turns out to be more interested in Frederic. Military regulations forbid their relationship, but after Frederic ends up in the Milanese hospital where Catherine gets sent after Rinaldi finds out about it, they renew their love for one another. After Frederic goes back to the front, Catherine learns she is pregnant and leaves the hospital for Switzerland, writing letters to her lover all the while.


Ernest Hemingway was not a man to mince words, and he was not pleased with Frank Borzage’s romantic approach to the story. Nevertheless, Borzage imbues the film with a visual splendor, including an exciting fight sequence and a scene told shot from the point of view of Frederic’s bed. He also manages to extract fine performances from his cast; Gary Cooper is the perfect choice to capture Lt. Henry’s everyman qualities and his love for Catherine despite some of the things she does. Had the film been made two years later, Benjamin Glazer and Oliver H.P. Garrett’s screenplay would have had to make major concessions where the film’s third act plot twist and the issue of abortion are concerned. Charles Lang’s cinematography uses bold yet soft contrasts of light and dark to complement the lavish set design and lend an air of romance to the atmosphere.


The film received two Academy Awards (Best Cinematography and Best Sound) and two nominations (Best Picture and Best Art Direction). Selznick ended his career with a coldly-received 1957 remake starring Rock Hudson and Jennifer Jones.


Little Lord Fauntleroy (1936)

4/5


After the Earl of Dorincourt (C. Aubrey Smith) disowned his son for marrying an American commoner (Dolores Costello), all his sons eventually died, leaving his estranged grandson Ceddie Errol (Freddie Bartholomew) as the only heir to his title. Ceddie and his mother, whom he simply calls “Dearest,” live a modest life in Brooklyn, where his friend, Dick Tipton (Mickey Rooney), is a bootblack. After the Earl’s lawyer tracks Ceddie down, he brings him and his mother to England, but only Ceddie stays at the castle because the Earl forbids the boy’s mother to live with them. Ceddie impresses the Earl by holding his own on theories of governance and pacifism, bonding with the staff on sight and even breaking through the old man’s seemingly impenetrable emotional shell. After Ceddie’s introduction to royal society, his position is threatened when an Minna Tipton (Helen Flint) claims that her son Tom (Jackie Searl) is the son of the earl’s eldest son.


Based on the novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, the film provides a talented young actor, Freddie Bartholomew, with the perfect showcase. His convincing yet genuinely heartwarming performance as the young lord makes the film, and he works exceptionally well with C. Aubrey Smith, a fine choice as the crotchety Earl. Mickey Rooney is effective in his small but vital role. When dealing with a sentimental story like this, one must keep in mind how much sentimentality the audience can take. John Cromwell’s sensitive direction guides the actors’ performances deftly, making their relationships credible.


A Star is Born (1937)

4.5/5


Esther Blodgett (Janet Gaynor) yearns to be a Hollywood actress. Despite her aunt (Clara Blandick) and father’s protestations, Esther’s grandmother (May Robson) gives her the money and the gumption to give it a chance. Though Hollywood work is scarce, Esther soon finds a friend in Danny McGuire (Andy Devine), an out-of-work assistant director. When they go to a concert, she encounters Norman Maine (Fredric March), a formerly prominent actor now struggling with alcoholism, making a scene. After she gets a job as a waitress, she sees him again and notices her, leading her to a screen test. Soon, she becomes “Vicki Lester,” landing the female leading role alongside Norman in The Enchanted Hour, which makes her dreams of stardom come true. Meanwhile, as Esther and Norman marry, his drinking continues to get worse despite his promises to change.


The impact of this story on audiences of the time was greater than it would be today. In the days before TV gossip shows, new media technology and changing social mores made celebrity scandal commonplace, studio bosses were able to keep its stars’ less savory behavior under wraps. And much has been written—even a book—about the film’s celebrated 1954 Judy Garland-starring musical remake (and its much less celebrated 1976 musical re-remake, not to mention Clint Eastwood’s planned re-re-remake that was supposed to star Beyoncé). this 1937 original still packs an emotional punch 75 years later. Janet Gaynor’s superb performance as Esther makes you really care for her and want her to become a star, while Fredric March proves equally adept at capturing Norman’s desperate decline. William A. Wellman directs the film with an efficient sheen that balances the script’s pathos enough to let Dorothy Parker’s notoriously acidic wit and bluntly honest view of fame shine through.

          
Nothing Sacred (1937)

4.5/5


At a charity event in New York, a man (Troy Brown) posing as an African nobleman is exposed as a fake when his wife shows up. Wally Cook (Fredric March), the newspaper reporter who staged the hoax, asks his boss Oliver Stone (Wally Connolly) to give him his old beat back after demoting him to the obituaries. He finds himself assigned to the sad story of Hazel Flagg (Carole Lombard), a factory worker in Warsaw, Vermont, dying of radiation poisoning, at least according to Dr. Enoch Downer (Charles Winninger). Having received a monetary settlement from her factory, she uses it on a stylish New York trip. The city gives her a hero’s welcome, going so far as to shower her with a ticker tape parade. While Wally sees her story as a chance to clear his name, the two of them start to fall in love.


A stingingly funny indictment of media hysteria that still rings true today, Nothing Sacred is one of the quintessential screwball comedies of the 1930s. Ben Hecht’s screenplay gives Carole Lombard and Fredric March a smartly constructed plot and a rapier wit to work with. They handle their roles perfectly, never hitting a false note. William A. Wellman’s direction handles the glossy production with restraint, letting the comedy shine through the lush sets.


The Video:


All films are presented in their original 1.33:1 aspect ratios in AVC-encoded transfers. Authorized by Selznick’s estate, the boxes state all the films are mastered from his personal 35mm prints, which were stored at the George Eastman House. As expected, Kino has transferred the prints “as is.”


Bird of Paradise:

3/5


The print used in this B&W transfer shows every day of its 80 years. Splice marks, dirt and scratches are plentiful. On the plus side, the film’s grain structure appears to be intact and the contrast is decent; blacks are dark and whites are bright without being blown out. The picture is sharp enough to reveal how many shots appear to be using diffusion filters.


A Farewell to Arms:

3.5/5


This print is a cut above most of the others. It starts out with some scratches, but it soon becomes much cleaner overall with consistent, natural grain patterns, rich blacks and grays, bright whites that never bloom. However, it still has some cue marks and missing frames.


Little Lord Fauntleroy:

3/5


The film starts with the Selznick International logo, which then fades out in a way that suggests the fade was video-generated. After that, the credits are unnaturally soft, but sharpness improves a bit in the main feature. Despite considerable dust, scratches and splice marks, the contrast is good, with inky blacks and fairly bright whites.


A Star is Born:

3/5


Shot in Technicolor, the transfer features a warm, subdued color palette. Contrast is high; blacks are extremely dark to the point where shadow detail is lost, especially in interior scenes. The level of sharpness varies from shot to shot, but the amount of fine detail isn’t nearly as much as an Ultra-Resolution transfer would have revealed. Moderate grain and dirt are present throughout, while splices, scratches and missing frames mar the picture on a couple of instances.


Nothing Sacred:

2.5/5


Long unavailable in any version even remotely resembling its 3-strip Technicolor cinematography, Disney performed an extensive restoration on this film in the 1990s. Unfortunately, to my knowledge, the restoration has yet to see the light of day on home video. This dye-transfer print-sourced transfer sports subdued color with inconsistently timed fleshtones, fairly high contrast, average sharpness, and occasional dirt and scratches. It’s better than the two-color versions that used to circulate, but it still isn’t great.


The Audio:


All films are 2.0 LPCM mono.


Bird of Paradise:

2/5


The soundtrack is very shrill with constant distortions, pops and hissing. The noise spreads across multiple speakers. Bass becomes powerful in a scene where the natives beat the drums.


A Farewell to Arms:

3/5


The audio is clear but compressed and boomy, with sporadic pops and consistent crackling.


Little Lord Fauntleroy:

3/5


An average 30s mono track with as expected levels of distortion, compression and optical print noise.


A Star is Born:

3/5


This track has some pops and hisses with an average level of distortion and compression for the era.


Nothing Sacred:

3/5


This film’s mono track leaves a bit to be desired where dynamic range is concerned. There is distortion, but it doesn’t overwhelm the intelligibility of the dialogue.


The Extras:


All extras are 1080p.


A Star is Born:

1.5/5


—Trailer (2:48)

—Still Gallery: 5 production photos  and 11 lobby cards, one of which erroneously calls the film the first in Technicolor.

—Technicolor Wardrobe test (1:15)


All other films:

1/5


All films have 1080p trailers for Nothing Sacred, A Star is Born and Pandora and the Flying Dutchman.


Final Score:

4/5


Kino’s The David O. Selznick Collection chooses five fine films that demonstrate his knack for picking the best source material, his push for higher production values and his gift for picking ideal actors and directors for the source material. While these Blu-ray transfers put every bit of wear and tear of the prints on display, they are superior to the alternative: other public domain DVDs of even worse quality.


Enough is enough, Disney. No more evasions or excuses. We DEMAND the release Song of the South on Blu-ray along with the uncut version of Bedknobs and Broomsticks on Blu-ray. I will not support anything your company produces until then.


#2 of 20 OFFLINE   Robert Harris

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Posted December 21 2012 - 11:09 AM

Nice piece, Kevin.


For the record, the "subdued color" was the look of these films in the mid-1930s.


RAH


"All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible. This I did." T.E. Lawrence


#3 of 20 OFFLINE   WadeM

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Posted December 21 2012 - 11:54 AM

I don't think I've ever heard worse audio than on the Bird of Paradise blu-ray. I'd give it a 1 or 0. I couldn't even make out a lot of the dialogue. Isn't the distortion from Kino doing something incorrect as opposed to inherent distortion?

#4 of 20 OFFLINE   John Morgan

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Posted December 21 2012 - 12:17 PM

I don't think I've ever heard worse audio than on the Bird of Paradise blu-ray. I'd give it a 1 or 0. I couldn't even make out a lot of the dialogue. Isn't the distortion from Kino doing something incorrect as opposed to inherent distortion?

Yes, only their version has this sound. Even the PD versions have better sound by a country mile.

#5 of 20 OFFLINE   atcolomb

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Posted December 21 2012 - 03:14 PM

For a good read on Selznick i recomend Ronald Haver's book "David O Selznick's Hollywood" , a wonderfully written and beautifully produced book on the man and the movies he made. Did find "Nothing Sacred" very funny when i saw it broadcast on TCM for the first time and would like to see "Duel in the Sun" on blu-ray one day soon.

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Posted December 22 2012 - 04:01 AM

I'm 77 years old and have been around for most of Hitchcock's U.S. output. The films in this package are mostly lower level Hitchcock, though there ARE some interesting films here. In my youth the imprimatur of David O. Selznick on a film or in the advertising, if only of one of his stars to another studio, meant that the production was going to at least strive for higher production values and writing than the average film. It is a terrible, terrible shame that his work has been more or less neglected. Every effort should be made to preserve all of his films in the highest quality possible for the time is likely coming when he will be recognized as an important stepping stone in the history of film. I wish with all my heart that someone would fund a thorough "Lawrence-like" restoration of DUEL IN THE SUN. It speaks to us in so many ways and is about the ONLY film that accurately exhibits the sizzling sex appeal of early Gregory Peck. He was a good actor in the end, come to glory in "MOCKINGBIRD," yet cold and plastic in many of his films. Here he sets the sets on fire! :-) The original color was Technicolor at its fevered best....color you DROWNED in.....whether in the cantina, the sump, or the "Trek to the Sun" at the end. One of my most treasured recordings most of my life has been an RCA VICTOR 78rpm album of selections from the film, composed by Dimitri Tiomkin who had a remarkable ability to theme the early west with unforgettable melodies. This release was accompanied by magnificent color pages inserted into the front of the album that almost capture the magic of Technicolor in print form. For many years DUEL IN THE SUN remained the most popular western on broadcast TV. I do not understand why been it has been relegated to the back of the programmer's rack in ensuing decades. No one can take the story seriously. Of course it is silly but so are most of the blu-ray titles today. This one has historic importance and is not just another gross teen flick. C'mon guys, let's join Lilian Gish, Lionel Barrymore, Josheph Cotton and the rest of our stars for a refreshing dip in the sump!!!!!!!

#7 of 20 OFFLINE   Robert Harris

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Posted December 22 2012 - 04:34 AM

Originally Posted by Robert Ketler 

I'm 77 years old and have been around for most of Hitchcock's U.S. output. The films in this package are mostly lower level Hitchcock, though there ARE some interesting films here. In my youth the imprimatur of David O. Selznick on a film or in the advertising, if only of one of his stars to another studio, meant that the production was going to at least strive for higher production values and writing than the average film.
It is a terrible, terrible shame that his work has been more or less neglected. Every effort should be made to preserve all of his films in the highest quality possible for the time is likely coming when he will be recognized as an important stepping stone in the history of film.
I wish with all my heart that someone would fund a thorough "Lawrence-like" restoration of DUEL IN THE SUN. It speaks to us in so many ways and is about the ONLY film that accurately exhibits the sizzling sex appeal of early Gregory Peck. He was a good actor in the end, come to glory in "MOCKINGBIRD," yet cold and plastic in many of his films. Here he sets the sets on fire! :-)
The original color was Technicolor at its fevered best....color you DROWNED in.....whether in the cantina, the sump, or the "Trek to the Sun" at the end. One of my most treasured recordings most of my life has been an RCA VICTOR 78rpm album of selections from the film, composed by Dimitri Tiomkin who had a remarkable ability to theme the early west with unforgettable melodies. This release was accompanied by magnificent color pages inserted into the front of the album that almost capture the magic of Technicolor in print form.
For many years DUEL IN THE SUN remained the most popular western on broadcast TV. I do not understand why been it has been relegated to the back of the programmer's rack in ensuing decades. No one can take the story seriously. Of course it is silly but so are most of the blu-ray titles today. This one has historic importance and is not just another gross teen flick. C'mon guys, let's join Lilian Gish, Lionel Barrymore, Josheph Cotton and the rest of our stars for a refreshing dip in the sump!!!!!!!


I examined the DitS elements about a decade ago, when we were doing testing with the Chinese dye transfer process.  At that time, as housed by MOMA, they were pristine.


I doubt that any restorative efforts would be needed, outside of a bit of clean-up.   Everything is available and ready for printing or scanning, and reference prints are available.


RAH


"All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible. This I did." T.E. Lawrence


#8 of 20 OFFLINE   jeffsultanof

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Posted December 22 2012 - 05:36 AM

I saw a gorgeous 35MM print some ten years ago of Duel in the Sun, probably struck in the fifties. Is my memory accurate, or did ABC once own the rights to this film? I would certainly buy a Blu-ray of Duel. The photography, color and music are outstanding, and everyone plays the material with such conviction as ridiculous as it is.

#9 of 20 OFFLINE   Mark Edward Heuck

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Posted December 22 2012 - 05:05 PM

I saw a gorgeous 35MM print some ten years ago of Duel in the Sun, probably struck in the fifties. Is my memory accurate, or did ABC once own the rights to this film? I would certainly buy a Blu-ray of Duel. The photography, color and music are outstanding, and everyone plays the material with such conviction as ridiculous as it is.

ABC, or Disney I suppose, does indeed own almost the entire Selznick Studio library. They are currently still under license to MGM through a deal they made with Disney back in 2003 for their ABC Motion Pictures assets. Since the films in this package are in Public Domain, and MGM's had their travails (including a near-stop to catalog releases during The Sony Occupation), there has been little incentive to release these direct from the negatives in the vaults; as such we are stuck with these versions which are made from archival material that is not quite up to scratch.
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#10 of 20 OFFLINE   John Morgan

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Posted December 23 2012 - 02:41 AM

I think only a few titles are truly in the PD from the titles Disney now own of the Selznick productions. When Scott MacQueen started his preservation of the materials, he left virtually no stone unturned in putting together the best, and most authentic versions. Where there were problems, he would call in prints from other sources to compare material and make sure both sound and visuals would be the best technology would allow at the time. I was fortunate to see most of these at the Disney studios, projected in 35mm. The color films were stunning, including GARDEN OF ALLAH, DUEL IN THE SUN, ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER (long version), NOTHING SACRED up to both versions of GONE TO EARTH (The Wild Heart). The black and white films were similarly well treated, including REBECCA, NOTORIOUS, INTERMEZZO, SINCE YOU WENT AWAY, THE PARADINE CASE, THE SPIRAL STAIRCASE, SPELLBOUND, etc. Even the two PD titles LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY and the color NOTHING SACRED looked and sounded fabulous. Unfortunately, a couple of titles made it to DVD using materials before the final restoration was completed. I don’t think NOTHING SACRED has been seen outside the studio. And ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER was released only in Europe (Pal) and shown on TCM occasionally. So, at least good materials are available for scanning for today’s technology.

#11 of 20 OFFLINE   MatthewA

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Posted December 23 2012 - 05:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by atcolomb 

For a good read on Selznick i recomend Ronald Haver's book "David O Selznick's Hollywood" , a wonderfully written and beautifully produced book on the man and the movies he made. Did find "Nothing Sacred" very funny when i saw it broadcast on TCM for the first time and would like to see "Duel in the Sun" on blu-ray one day soon.

My mother had that book and still does. The section on Gone with the Wind alone is enough for its own book. Between books this, his Criterion laserdisc commentaries and his book and reconstruction efforts for the 1954 A Star is Born, it seems we really lost Ron Haver too soon.


Enough is enough, Disney. No more evasions or excuses. We DEMAND the release Song of the South on Blu-ray along with the uncut version of Bedknobs and Broomsticks on Blu-ray. I will not support anything your company produces until then.


#12 of 20 OFFLINE   MatthewA

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Posted December 23 2012 - 06:01 AM

Originally Posted by Robert Harris 

Nice piece, Kevin.


For the record, the "subdued color" was the look of these films in the mid-1930s.


RAH


I've always associated the typical "Glorious Technicolor" look of bright lighting and vivid color with The Wizard of Oz and Disney animation, which were already my first film viewing memories to begin with, and it's still interesting to see this more painterly-like look whenever it's presented on video or public screenings.


Enough is enough, Disney. No more evasions or excuses. We DEMAND the release Song of the South on Blu-ray along with the uncut version of Bedknobs and Broomsticks on Blu-ray. I will not support anything your company produces until then.


#13 of 20 OFFLINE   JoeDoakes

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Posted December 28 2012 - 06:23 PM

Unfortunately, a couple of titles made it to DVD using materials before the final restoration was completed. I don’t think NOTHING SACRED has been seen outside the studio. And ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER was released only in Europe (Pal) and shown on TCM occasionally. So, at least good materials are available for scanning for today’s technology.

Echo Bridge recently released The Adventures of Tom Sawyer on DVD (plus two "bonus" movies). To my nonexpert eyes it looked very good. It may be a copy of a PAL release. My understanding is that Disney owns this title, so this may be technically a boot. At any rate, the people at Disney should be ashamed of the way they have treated the Selznick library for the past 15 years. They could have licensed their restored versions of the less valuable nonHitchcock titles to Kino, or Criterion or Olive or Twilight Time and we likely would have seen very good to top notch blu rays. Instead, this and the Kino releases may be the best we can get.

#14 of 20 OFFLINE   JoHud

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Posted December 28 2012 - 08:19 PM

Echo Bridge has had past deals with Disney recently, so it is possible the release of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is legit. Thanks for the heads up on that one, it certainly flew under the radar.

#15 of 20 OFFLINE   Robert Harris

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Posted December 29 2012 - 12:53 AM

Echo Bridge recently released The Adventures of Tom Sawyer on DVD (plus two "bonus" movies). To my nonexpert eyes it looked very good. It may be a copy of a PAL release. My understanding is that Disney owns this title, so this may be technically a boot. At any rate, the people at Disney should be ashamed of the way they have treated the Selznick library for the past 15 years. They could have licensed their restored versions of the less valuable nonHitchcock titles to Kino, or Criterion or Olive or Twilight Time and we likely would have seen very good to top notch blu rays. Instead, this and the Kino releases may be the best we can get.

Tom Sawyer is under copyright, and fully protected. There are two cuts of the film. Work, based upon the original elements was performed several years ago. RAH

"All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible. This I did." T.E. Lawrence


#16 of 20 OFFLINE   Matt Hough

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Posted December 29 2012 - 09:39 AM

Certainly would love to have The Adventures of Tom Sawyer on Blu-ray. It's probably my favorite Selznick International movie of the 1930s apart from GWTW.



#17 of 20 OFFLINE   JoeDoakes

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Posted December 29 2012 - 04:30 PM

Echo Bridge has had past deals with Disney recently, so it is possible the release of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is legit. Thanks for the heads up on that one, it certainly flew under the radar.

I did not know that. If they are licensing material from Disney it may be legit. It looks quite good and the packaging notes "first time on DVD." Here is the Amazon link: http://www.amazon.co...s of tom sawyer

#18 of 20 OFFLINE   Mark-P

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Posted January 17 2013 - 07:25 AM

Just picked up this set and I concur that Kino did something terribly wrong with the sound on Bird of Paradise and Little Lord Fauntleroy. They don't decode properly to the center channel with pro-logic but bleed sound into all the speakers like a faux-stereo effect. It's best to just listen in straight stereo because 2-channel mono it ain't. And the pops, crackles and static is almost intolerable!

#19 of 20 OFFLINE   MatthewA

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Posted January 17 2013 - 01:13 PM

Originally Posted by Mark-P 

Just picked up this set and I concur that Kino did something terribly wrong with the sound on Bird of Paradise and Little Lord Fauntleroy. They don't decode properly to the center channel with pro-logic but bleed sound into all the speakers like a faux-stereo effect. It's best to just listen in straight stereo because 2-channel mono it ain't. And the pops, crackles and static is almost intolerable!


It sounds like this was a pressing error.


Enough is enough, Disney. No more evasions or excuses. We DEMAND the release Song of the South on Blu-ray along with the uncut version of Bedknobs and Broomsticks on Blu-ray. I will not support anything your company produces until then.


#20 of 20 OFFLINE   John Weller

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Posted January 21 2013 - 09:25 AM

Is it just those two films that have the sound problem?





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Blu-ray Reviews

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