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Where are these roadshows?


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#1 of 23 Guest_Larry-Bender_*

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Posted November 11 2012 - 12:03 PM

OK this has been brought up before, but let us do an update. Here is a list of roadshows that I would like to see on blu. STAR! DOCTOR DOLITTLE HELLO DOLLY- spring 2013. AGONY AND ECTASY-2014 HAWAII --- FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD D LORD JIM FUNNY GIRL-2013 GOODBYE MR CHIPS SWEET CHARITY RYANS DAUGHTER 2013? LION IN WINTER----- KHARTOUM ------- FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE E

#2 of 23 OFFLINE   Dr Griffin

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Posted November 11 2012 - 12:18 PM

If you have a region free player, I know Doctor Dolittle and Fall of the Roman Empire are on Blu-ray. Also El Cid is available on region B. Region free BD players are fairly cheap now and worth the investment.

#3 of 23 OFFLINE   lukejosephchung

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Posted November 11 2012 - 02:55 PM

The Agony & The Ecstasy is tentatively scheduled for 2013 release via Twilight Time Entertainment...Funny Girl is being restored by Sony's Grover Crisp for its 45th Anniversary theatrical and blu-ray release, and Lord Jim is also currently on Sony's restoration front burner for next year as well.Posted Image



#4 of 23 OFFLINE   GMpasqua

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Posted November 11 2012 - 06:29 PM

Where is "Oliver!" ????



#5 of 23 OFFLINE   Matt Hough

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Posted November 12 2012 - 12:31 AM

Originally Posted by GMpasqua 

Where is "Oliver!" ????


I thought I read somewhere it's coming out in 2013, too. Maybe that was just wishful thinking on my part!



#6 of 23 OFFLINE   Mike Frezon

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Posted November 12 2012 - 02:47 PM

Disney's got a roadshow of The Happiest Millionaire that I would be first in line to order if it was to be released on Blu.

There's Jessie the yodeling cowgirl. Bullseye, he's Woody's horse. Pete the old prospector. And, Woody, the man himself.Of course, it's time for Woody's RoundUp. He's the very best! He's the rootinest, tootinest cowboy in the wild, wild west!


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#7 of 23 OFFLINE   benbess

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Posted November 12 2012 - 02:49 PM

OK this has been brought up before, but let us do an update. Here is a list of roadshows that I would like to see on blu. STAR! DOCTOR DOLITTLE HELLO DOLLY- spring 2013. AGONY AND ECTASY-2014 HAWAII --- FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD D LORD JIM FUNNY GIRL-2013 GOODBYE MR CHIPS SWEET CHARITY RYANS DAUGHTER 2013? LION IN WINTER----- KHARTOUM ------- FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE E

Would like to see these on blu. The Agony and the Ecstasy looks very good in HD. Too bad the movie was made before they cleaned the Sistine Chapel ceiling!

#8 of 23 OFFLINE   TonyD

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Posted November 12 2012 - 03:13 PM

What is a roadshow edition or what makes it different from the non RS version?
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#9 of 23 OFFLINE   Mike Frezon

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Posted November 12 2012 - 04:43 PM

Originally Posted by TonyD 

What is a roadshow edition or what makes it different from the non RS version?


I'm glad to "wiki" that for you, Tony!  Posted Image


A roadshow theatrical release (known also as reserved seat engagement) was a term in the American motion picture industry for a practice in which a film opened in a limited number of theaters in large cities like Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Houston, Atlanta, Dallas, and San Francisco for a specific period of time before the nationwide general release. Although variants of roadshow releases occasionally still exist, the practice mostly ended in the early 1970s.

As far as is known, virtually all of the films given roadshow releases were subsequently distributed to regular movie theatres. This was called a general release, and was akin to the modern day wide release of a film. However, there are four important differences between a roadshow presentation of a film and today's limited releases:

    [*] Films shown as roadshow releases, especially those made between 1952 and 1974, were nearly always longer than the usual motion picture, lasting anywhere from slightly more than two hours to four hours or more, counting the intermission (examples include the 1959 Ben-Hur, or the 1963 Cleopatra). There were no short subjects accompanying the film, and rarely any movie trailers. [*] Roadshow presentations were always shown on a one or two-performance a day, reserved seat basis, and admission prices were always higher than those of regular screenings. Unlike today's limited releases, seats had to be reserved, one could not simply buy a ticket at the box office and go in to watch the film. The two-performance-a-day screenings were usually limited to Wednesdays, Saturdays, and Sundays. During the rest of the week the films would be shown only once a day. (In the case of Oklahoma!, however, there were three showings of the film a day. [1]) [*] Souvenir programs were often available at roadshow presentations of films, much as souvenir programs are made available when one goes to see a Broadway play or musical. These programs contained photos from the film, photos and biographies of its cast and principal crew, and information on how the film was made, rather like today's "extras" on DVD's. [*] In the days of frequent roadshow releases, production companies and film distributors never used them to determine whether or not a film should be given a wide release, as is done today occasionally when films perform poorly at the box office. From the 1920's to the mid-1970's, a roadshow release would always play widely after its original engagements. This was true even of box office flops.


There's Jessie the yodeling cowgirl. Bullseye, he's Woody's horse. Pete the old prospector. And, Woody, the man himself.Of course, it's time for Woody's RoundUp. He's the very best! He's the rootinest, tootinest cowboy in the wild, wild west!


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Dieting with my Dog & Heart to Heart/Hand in Paw by Peggy Frezon


#10 of 23 Guest_Larry-Bender_*

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Posted November 12 2012 - 04:53 PM

I would add that "roadshows" were often shown in 70mm.

#11 of 23 OFFLINE   Matt Hough

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Posted November 13 2012 - 12:27 AM

The running time of a roadshow engagement was also extended usually by an overture, intermission music, and exit music. All of these musical interludes would be cut when the film went out for general release, and sometimes the film itself would be shortened, too (easy to do in musicals by lopping off some musical numbers much to the dismay of those of us who wanted to see the film again but missed some favorite numbers).



#12 of 23 OFFLINE   RolandL

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Posted November 13 2012 - 02:00 AM

How to run a proper roadshow presentation Instruction from the studios

Roland Lataille
Cinerama web site

 


#13 of 23 OFFLINE   GMpasqua

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Posted November 13 2012 - 02:39 AM

Plus, Roadshows usually played at only one theater per city and sometimes as as long as 2 years. The theaters were heavily decorated with posters and large photos and dsiplays for the film. Tickets could be purchased at the box office or ticket centers around town which also advertised the film.  The theaters sold expensive candy and no popcorn, it was a class act all the way


Basically a Roadshow was the same as a Broadway show with the main difference being watching film instead of a live performance



#14 of 23 OFFLINE   lukejosephchung

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Posted November 14 2012 - 06:58 AM

Originally Posted by MattH. 


I thought I read somewhere it's coming out in 2013, too. Maybe that was just wishful thinking on my part!

2013 is the 45th Anniversary of this 1968 Best Picture Oscar winner...if Sony's marketing department and Mr. Crisp have "Oliver!" on their front burner, it won't be wishful thinking...they've already announced "Funny Girl" for this coming year, which is also a 1968 release...



#15 of 23 OFFLINE   MatthewA

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Posted November 14 2012 - 02:16 PM

Originally Posted by lukejosephchung 

2013 is the 45th Anniversary of this 1968 Best Picture Oscar winner...if Sony's marketing department and Mr. Crisp have "Oliver!" on their front burner, it won't be wishful thinking...they've already announced "Funny Girl" for this coming year, which is also a 1968 release...


I'd be really surprised if they didn't do something with Oliver! next year. Other than 1776, it's the last major Columbia musical that hasn't been confirmed for Blu-ray. And their musicals seem to be a high priority, seeing how this year we got Annie, Bye Bye Birdie, Cover Girl and Lost Horizon.


Enough is enough, Disney. No more evasions or excuses. We DEMAND the release Song of the South on Blu-ray along with the uncut version of Bedknobs and Broomsticks on Blu-ray. I will not support anything your company produces until then.


#16 of 23 OFFLINE   Humm

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Posted November 16 2012 - 06:15 AM

If I am not mistaken, the Robert Wise film "Star" opened with a roadshow engagement,, but did poorly. Before it made it to general release, the studio pulled it back, chopped it up horribly, and gave it the nutty title, "Those Were the Happy Times". Fortunately, the film - which is rather good - can be seen on DVD the way it was meant to be presented.

#17 of 23 OFFLINE   rsmithjr

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Posted November 16 2012 - 06:31 AM

The running time of a roadshow engagement was also extended usually by an overture, intermission music, and exit music. All of these musical interludes would be cut when the film went out for general release, and sometimes the film itself would be shortened, too (easy to do in musicals by lopping off some musical numbers much to the dismay of those of us who wanted to see the film again but missed some favorite numbers).

Whether or not the music and other parts would be cut varied greatly on the film itself. For example, to my knowledge all theatrical releases of Ben-hur conformed exactly to the original roadshow release.

#18 of 23 OFFLINE   JosephGC

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Posted November 16 2012 - 06:38 AM

I would add that "roadshows" were often shown in 70mm.

Only from 1950s on. Early roadshows (1920s thru 50s) did not have 70mm.

#19 of 23 OFFLINE   JosephGC

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Posted November 16 2012 - 06:44 AM

Whether or not the music and other parts would be cut varied greatly on the film itself. For example, to my knowledge all theatrical releases of Ben-hur conformed exactly to the original roadshow release.

A shorten 3 hr version of BEN HUR (no intermission, oveture and complete pre title opening sequence removed) was made available for subrun markets. I saw this version in 1969 after the 70mm re-release roadshow ended.

#20 of 23 OFFLINE   Rob_Ray

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Posted November 16 2012 - 06:44 AM

Whether or not the music and other parts would be cut varied greatly on the film itself. For example, to my knowledge all theatrical releases of Ben-hur conformed exactly to the original roadshow release.

No, I saw a theatrical release of Ben-Hur long after the roadshow run that ran just under three hours. I'm not sure what else was cut, but I remember that there was no nativity prologue. The MGM lion's roar went directly into the title credits. Of the roadshow films longer than three hours, I know that Gone With the Wind and The Ten Commandments were famously touted as being "intact and uncut." Most others were fair game for the scissors at some point.




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