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Adding Large PA speakers to room?


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#1 of 11 MikeGee

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Posted September 25 2012 - 01:20 AM

Hey guys. Not sure if this is the right area for the question... Just bought a new home and I am redoing the entire basement. I just picked up 2 PA speakers (15" + 12" woofers + tweeter behind the horn each). They are made by Traynor and I would like to hook them up downstairs in our future bar/lounge which connects to my home home theater. I also got a cabinet with 2 15" subwoofers in it which are not powered by any amplifier. This gear was used by an old musician I'm just unsure of how he powered it all. I would like to have these speakers only for music for when I would have a large enough party.(i'm guessing a plate amp from Parts Express would work) The PA speakers each run at 4ohms 100watts They do not take typical speaker wire however they have 6.3mm inputs which im sure were used to hook up to old band equipment I have a Pioneer 1014tx. Do i need to get a second amplifier or receiver to control any of this? is it possible to hook it up to my Pioneer? Any reccomendations or suggestions would be great. I really hope that i can use these speakers to test out the durability of my walls in the upcoming months. Thanks ~mike

#2 of 11 schan1269

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Posted September 25 2012 - 03:44 AM

Instead of calling those 6.3mm, call them 1/4. TRS(which is what those are) have been around 100+ years. They are the most common connection on "road gear". It is the same connection on guitars, guitar pedals...and everything else. You can make your own speaker wire with TRS ends. Or buy some TRS speaker wire and cut one of the TRS off. That Pioneer "should" run those fine. But if it gets too hot, get something else. Those should be freakishly efficient. http://www.amazon.co...s speaker cable Edit: Good news is, the 1014 you have has pre-outs... http://www.amazon.co...ional amplifier

#3 of 11 Robert_J

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Posted September 25 2012 - 05:32 AM

I run a Pioneer 1014 and use 4 ohm speakers. The 1014 was the last regular model from Pioneer to use the Pioneer Elite power supply. I did run into an odd situation though. During the Dark Knight (Batman) when they shoot the zip line in an early scene, at normal listening levels it would shut down. I had done some cleaning and plugged it into my regular outlet instead of my 20am dedicated outlet. Once I switched outlets, I could crank the volume without any issues. Just make sure you provide adequate juice to the receiver.

#4 of 11 MikeGee

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Posted September 25 2012 - 06:53 AM

Thanks for the input so far guys! I was thinking about running my 1014 in 5.1 for this home theater and then using the extra 2 speakers as my "Second zone" just for music. Unless i could go 7.1 plus a second zone... Would that work? That Berhinger amp looks pretty sweet. Do you think I would need to get it right away? Or can i do a test run direct to the Pioneer to see what i can get outta it? I'm not in a rush to finish this project. I am going to do everything from sound proofing, dedicated electrical outlets to all the wiring as properly as i can go.

#5 of 11 Robert_J

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Posted September 25 2012 - 07:48 AM

The 1014 isn't a multi-zone receiver. You can't just assign a set of speaker outputs to run a 2nd zone. Plus there is no easy way to control a second zone from a different room. The Behringer is a nice amp. I run the larger model as my sub amp. It's also noisy as heck. Since I couldn't install it in a closet, I had to perform a fan swap. It's easy if you aren't afraid to open up a perfectly good piece of equipment. I suggest you run a test and see hot it goes. As I mentioned, you have to provide a good electrical system for this receiver.

#6 of 11 MikeGee

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Posted September 28 2012 - 10:53 PM

Quick question... As shown in the picture it has 2 1/4" inputs . Is one a audio in and the other an audio out to the other speaker? Or is one input say for the 15" speaker and the other is for the horn and 12" speaker? Just curious how i should try and hook it up to my receiver. Thanks again!

#7 of 11 schan1269

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Posted September 28 2012 - 11:13 PM

Unless you have a manual... Trial and error. My guess(and pure guess) is they are for Daisy Chain.

#8 of 11 Robert_J

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Posted September 29 2012 - 06:26 AM

Pull out the driver and look at how they are wired internally.

#9 of 11 MikeGee

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Posted February 16 2013 - 02:48 AM

Okay so I finally have some time to sit and plan how I am going to refinish my old vintage Traynor speakers. I looked online and found somthing I'm finding a bit confusing. The model of speakers is the Traynor YSC-9. According to the website i found on the speakers they are "A 15" 8 Ohm bass and 12" 8 Ohm mid RSC speakers plus an RCF H4823 sectoral horn and TW-100 driver .Our first enclosure with a real crossover (for the horn, the 12" was simply paralleled with the 15"). " My question is how are the speakers 8 Ohm resistance but it says its a 4 ohm 100 watts on my input? At what point does the resistance drop to 4 ohms from 8? Is it once it comes out of the cross over? Also is there any mods i can make with this setup to run it any better? Like change up the crossover or should i keep it in that 4ohm setup? Also I need to come up with a way to finish the exterior of the speakers. They are covered in that kinda faux leather type of speaker material found on most guitar amps. I'm thinking veneer, paint or speaker fabric to finish them. Any ideas?

#10 of 11 schan1269

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Posted February 16 2013 - 03:26 AM

Sounds like they wired the crossover in parallel(not sure how they got down to 4 from 16)... That "paragraph" is all there is of a 20 page "you want the real explanation"....so...unless you want to borrow Robert_J's book he's had since the 80s...and take the steep learning curve...let that paragraph be. Have you yanked the crossover(ie the speaker terminal) to see what it looks like? You could post a pic of both sides...then we'll all know what it does...so we won't be guessing on what to tell you to do.

#11 of 11 MikeGee

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Posted February 16 2013 - 04:15 AM

Okay here is a pic of the crossover that is inside. It all looks very retro to me The horn seems pretty hardcore for its size. The magnet is super heavy I'm just curious how i should power all this. It seems like it should be pretty powerful for a medium sized basement bar/sitting area Also the dual 1/4" connectors in the back seem to each have their own wire. One green and one black that goes from the input to the 12" which is connected to the 15" and the horn itself is only plugged into the crossover...




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