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think I need a new receiver


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10 replies to this topic

#1 of 11 OFFLINE   jeffav

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Posted September 10 2012 - 11:03 AM

I purchased a JVC RX-D702 around 2006. I've liked it, but it seems as though it's dying. I connected all my speakers up after a move into a new house and after playing it for awhile, especially a bit loudly, it just shuts off. I have troubleshot it by sequentially removing each of the speaker wires until it got to none. I removed the hdmi cables and it still dies. Any thoughts for further troubleshooting would be appreciated, but I think it looks like it's toast. Having said that, I need to look for another receiver and would like recommendations from non-vendors. My JVC was a good price and performance, so I don't need much more horsepower or cost than that. However, I don't want to get something that will be obsolete in a couple years. Specifically I'd like to get a unit that has upgradeable/programmable hdmi. I'm assuming that exists these days. Any other suggestion as to features I should look for? Thanks.

#2 of 11 OFFLINE   Jason Charlton

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Posted September 10 2012 - 12:10 PM

Hi Jeff, welcome to the forum.


 


A couple of quick thoughts - when you disconnected the speakers, did you disconnect the speaker wires at the receiver end? If not, that would be the first thing I would try.  Any stray bare wires back there can cause a short which may push the receiver into protect mode.


 


Also, have you noticed at all if the unit is hot or excessively warm when it shuts down?  Either of these issues may simply confirm what you've already assessed, but thought I'd ask just to be sure.


 


As for a replacement receiver, just about any mid-level models from Denon, Onkyo, Yamaha, Pioneer are worth checking out.  I am partial to Onkyo - Amazon has good deals on a few models including the http://www.amazon.co...=onkyo receiver

I don't want to get something that will be obsolete in a couple years. Specifically I'd like to get
a unit that has upgradeable/programmable hdmi.

 


Well, unfortunately, A/V receivers don't generally last a whole long time - that's why I tend to try not to overspend on them.  Speakers, on the other hand can last a lifetime...


 


With HDMI - that's (largely) a hardware spec - so "upgradeability" is pretty moot.  All current receivers are HDMI 1.4 which fully supports 3D and all the audio/network capabilities out there.  Even if you shop used/refurb you probably won't find anything earlier than 1.3 (you lose 3D then).  By the looks of it, your JVC is HDMI 1.1 - so you should see a nice convenience improvement going up to a newer model.  You won't need separate audio connections (not sure if yours needed them or not - but some HDMI 1.1 models wouldn't do audio over HDMI) and you should be able to benefit from all the latest audio formats without any trouble.


 


Programmability of HDMI inputs is pretty universal - be sure to download any manuals for receivers you're considering and give them a perusal to make sure it will do all that you want it to do.


 


Good luck.

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#3 of 11 OFFLINE   jeffav

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Posted September 10 2012 - 12:46 PM

Hi Jason, Yes, I unhooked the wires at the receiver end. This receiver is known to run hot, so it's hard to tell. I think it's gonzo. Seems I had or have a dvd player that allowed hdmi code upgrade. It's pretty sad that it's hardware mostly. At the very least it would be cool if there were a board upgrade or something.. Such compatibility issues still in the a/v world. Odd that hdmi was supposed to make things sort of plug and play and yes it does, but then the compatibility issues between the hdmi versions that seem to change every other year kind of defeats the purpose. Might as well just go with good old bulky, reliable component cables. :-) But, there are issues across the board still. Remote controls and stuff are such a mess. I do have a Harmony remote that I like, but even that can be a quite a challenge for the less technical. Selecting inputs have become more necessary than before for me. It should be easier than selecting through a list with a toggle button. I'm guessing some have wised up and made separate buttons for them. I've got Roku now to add to the mix. Hey, there's a question. What's the best way to hook up straight cable coming in that goes to no dvr or any other box; just cable that goes to the internal digital tv tuner? The way I did it was to go straight to the tv and then run a fiber cable from the tv to the a/v dbs in. Is that how it should be done? Anyway, thanks very much Jason for your advice. Jeff

#4 of 11 OFFLINE   schan1269

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Posted September 10 2012 - 01:09 PM

Toslink from your TV to the AVR is still the same. AVR now are even easier. I don't think your JVC took audio off the HDMI. That right there is reason enough to buy a new one. And AVR have a "life expectancy" of 3-6 years...based on relevance. There is "always" something new. Three years ago, it was "height/width" (DPL IIz/Aud DSX)... Two years ago it was 3D(hasn't fizzled...but is nowhere near "blockbuster" either)... If you don't need/couldn't care less about 3D...with careful purchasing, you don't need a new AVR either. Lots of people selling their HDMI 1.3 for 1/2 what they cost new...just so they can have ARC(ZZZzzzZZZzzzZZZ) and 3D. Case in point. Right about 18 months ago when the Onkyo X09 models debuted...I bought one of these, with the Ipod Dock included for $300...with shipping... http://www.amazon.co...ywords=tx sr707 When I bought it, the going rate, without the dock, was $400. The listing was only up for 25 minutes when I bought it. The lady sent me an email right after I bought it asking "Did I not ask enough for it?"... I then turned around, sold the dock and it paid for a Belkin FZ Bluetooth Music Receiver and a couple of BDs.

#5 of 11 OFFLINE   Jason Charlton

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Posted September 10 2012 - 01:20 PM

HDMI (like Blu-Ray) was released/unleashed on the public without having full support of the feature set that was envisioned.  The first year or two was a confusing mess, no doubt.   Generally, though, it has stabilized since it reached 1.3.  The advent of 3D (and HDMI 1.4) was somewhat late-breaking and for many folks not a dealbreaker.   For a while, some top of the line receiver models offered "upgradeable" card slots, but they were expensive as hell, and even they couldn't keep up with technology change and remain cost-effective.   Also, don't count on sticking with component video for too much longer - that's going the way of the dinosaur, too.  Better to try and keep everything in the HDMI realm for simplicity, then deal with the only major remaining hangup - potential handshake issues.  Those, at least, can usually be remedied by changing the powerup sequence and leaving some devices on all the time.   As for the TV connection - yes, if you are not using a STB, then the coax runs right into the TV and the audio will be output via the digital optical port.  Again, for simplicity sake, it's nice to stick with external boxes and connect both audio and video from each source via HDMI to the receiver for audio and video switching - running only a single HDMI from receiver to display.   By using the TVs internal tuner for cable, you'll need to switch inputs on both the TV and the receiver for cable watching, but that's your only option other than getting a STB as receivers do not include cable/satellite tuners.

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#6 of 11 OFFLINE   jeffav

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Posted September 10 2012 - 03:59 PM

I've wondered about 3D. When it first arrived, I'd heard it could be unhealthy to watch a great deal of, particularly for young people. Has any of that come to fruition?

#7 of 11 OFFLINE   jeffav

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Posted September 10 2012 - 04:01 PM

HDMI (like Blu-Ray) was released/unleashed on the public without having full support of the feature set that was envisioned.  The first year or two was a confusing mess, no doubt. Generally, though, it has stabilized since it reached 1.3.  The advent of 3D (and HDMI 1.4) was somewhat late-breaking and for many folks not a dealbreaker. For a while, some top of the line receiver models offered "upgradeable" card slots, but they were expensive as hell, and even they couldn't keep up with technology change and remain cost-effective. Also, don't count on sticking with component video for too much longer - that's going the way of the dinosaur, too.  Better to try and keep everything in the HDMI realm for simplicity, then deal with the only major remaining hangup - potential handshake issues.  Those, at least, can usually be remedied by changing the powerup sequence and leaving some devices on all the time. As for the TV connection - yes, if you are not using a STB, then the coax runs right into the TV and the audio will be output via the digital optical port.  Again, for simplicity sake, it's nice to stick with external boxes and connect both audio and video from each source via HDMI to the receiver for audio and video switching - running only a single HDMI from receiver to display. By using the TVs internal tuner for cable, you'll need to switch inputs on both the TV and the receiver for cable watching, but that's your only option other than getting a STB as receivers do not include cable/satellite tuners.
I guess I'd better just realize that again I'm renting an A/V for about five years. I hope that I don't see a 3D movie and actually like it. i hope htmi will not change too much for my next purchase. Thanks much for your help folks. Jeff

#8 of 11 OFFLINE   schan1269

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Posted September 10 2012 - 05:40 PM

The only way to "future proof" is to buy an AVR with 6/8 channel input(disappearing on AVR under $1000) and "every channel" pre-out... That way, when it is time for you to upgrade yours...somebody will want this one... Any AVR with an original price of $500 and under...those aren't going to have any resale value in 5 years.

#9 of 11 OFFLINE   jeffav

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Posted September 11 2012 - 03:14 AM

That's an interesting twist to those who say not to spend too much. I can see your point. I think I'd be too worried that the thing would break. AV receivers are on my list of items that in my lifetime seem to go bad with greater frequency than other technologies. Seems like it's always something; a channel going out or the thing shutting off or that it died completely. There are very few items I'd buy an extended warranty for, but I think an expensive AV receiver would be one of them.

#10 of 11 OFFLINE   schan1269

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Posted September 11 2012 - 07:37 AM

Upper end Denon(I think they still do) and Integra come with 3 years. The problem is, Denon is behind the 8 ball once you hit $1000. Everybody keeps wondering why Onkyo/Integra keep winning the "sumo class" every year... The only two AVR Denon has over $1100 are the 4311 and 5308. Both should have been retired already. Supposedly a 4311 replacement is "in the pipeline"(The Japan earthquake/tsunami hammered Denon) The only other AVR maker putting in a concerted effort on AVR over $1000 is Yamaha. Denon will again...once they get back from fixing the manufacturing plants. And apparently you can scrap the idea of a "new" current AVR with 6/8 channel pre-in. Onkyo dropped them, even on the 5010. Guess that means there are "never going to be" anymore sound modes made(hahaha)

#11 of 11 OFFLINE   jeffav

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Posted September 11 2012 - 08:33 AM

Out of my range until my lotto winnings anyway. Good info for the high end folks I imagine. Thanks.




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