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Double Features for a cinema or movie night.


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#1 of 48 OFFLINE   NY2LA

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Posted May 26 2012 - 10:58 PM

Let's say you're running a revival cinema, or just putting together a fun movie night with your friends... Which movies would you pick for a good double (or triple) feature? You could do... Originals and Remakes: "Three Little Women" the Hepburn, Allyson and Ryder versions. Straight and Spoof: Airport 1975, Zero Hour and Airplane! Straight and Musical Versions: Nights of Cabiria and Sweet Charity Smiles of a Summer Night and A Little Night Music Auntie Mame and MAME Goodbye Mr, Chips (Donat and O'Toole) Similar Themed Movies: Singin' in the Rain and The Band Wagon All About Eve and Sunset Boulevard Bring Up Baby and What's Up, Doc? Emma and Clueless Pillow Talk and Down With Love Doc Hollywood and Cars Murder by Death and Clue Miss-Cast Musicals Dolly! Mame Night Music Wanna get more creative? What, if any, shorts or cartoons would you add, and what would you serve to go with the show?

#2 of 48 OFFLINE   Robin9

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Posted May 27 2012 - 12:12 AM

Well, the obvious combination is Frontier Marshal and My Darling Clementine. The same basic story and in many scenes the same dialogue! Another combination along those lines would be Ride Lonesome and Six Black Horses which, by the same writer, Burt Kennedy, have several similar plot points and chunks of the same dialogue.

#3 of 48 OFFLINE   Douglas Monce

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Posted May 27 2012 - 01:27 AM

"Lifeboat" and "12 Angry Men". Both set in a single location, and both dramas about people making life or death choices. Doug
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#4 of 48 OFFLINE   Matt Hough

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Posted May 27 2012 - 04:31 AM

Except I don't find Gypsy miscast in the least. I honestly think it's one of the great screen musicals.

#5 of 48 OFFLINE   Jacksmyname

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Posted May 27 2012 - 05:42 AM

Well, for me the obvious would be Zero Hour and Airplane. My wife and I caught Zero Hour on TCM about 6 months ago. We had a great time comparing it to Airplane as we watched it. Almost the exact same movie.

#6 of 48 OFFLINE   Charles Smith

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Posted May 27 2012 - 06:57 AM

The Lost Weekend and Double Indemnity.  I saw these two at one of the many L.A. revival houses in the late '70s.  Not only are they two of the greatest that also play perfectly together, there's a serendipitous moment near the beginning of DI that had the attentive and appreciative full house exploding in laughter.  When MacMurray is admitted into the house while Stanwyck is fetched, the housekeeper tells him to wait in the living room, while warning (and I'm paraphrasing) that "they keep the liquor cabinet locked".  It was as though that brief moment itself relieved the tension and mood of the first film.  A moment of pure moviegoing bliss.  As is:   Casablanca and Play It Again, Sam.

#7 of 48 OFFLINE   Richard V

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Posted May 27 2012 - 07:28 AM

Action in the North Atlantic and Das Boot
See you at the pah-ty, Richter.

#8 of 48 OFFLINE   NY2LA

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Posted May 27 2012 - 09:42 AM

Except I don't find Gypsy miscast in the least. I honestly think it's one of the great screen musicals.
yeah I saw that one coming, And took it out when editing, apparently it stayed. I like the movie a lot too and wish it had got (along with Music Man) the kind of cool 2 disc packages My Fair Lady and Singin in the Rain got. I was told a funny story about how Merman had somehow got ahold of Roz's original vocal tracks and kept them for years to play at parties, where she would say something like "listen to that $&@*% &@%*! Ya call that singin?"

#9 of 48 OFFLINE   NY2LA

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Posted May 27 2012 - 09:48 AM

The Lost Weekend and Double Indemnity.  I saw these two at one of the many L.A. revival houses in the late '70s.  Not only are they two of the greatest that also play perfectly together, there's a serendipitous moment near the beginning of DI that had the attentive and appreciative full house exploding in laughter.  When MacMurray is admitted into the house while Stanwyck is fetched, the housekeeper tells him to wait in the living room, while warning (and I'm paraphrasing) that "they keep the liquor cabinet locked".  It was as though that brief moment itself relieved the tension and mood of the first film.  A moment of pure moviegoing bliss.  As is: Casablanca and Play It Again, Sam.
Nice! Keeep 'em coming! Any ideas on what you would serve or what featurettes you might add?

#10 of 48 OFFLINE   NY2LA

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Posted May 27 2012 - 09:57 AM

Well, for me the obvious would be Zero Hour and Airplane. My wife and I caught Zero Hour on TCM about 6 months ago. We had a great time comparing it to Airplane as we watched it. Almost the exact same movie.
Yeah true, and there are some of the same scenes in Airport 75, that are kinda unintentionally funnier than Airplane! The dorky 70s doctor talking about keeping Linda Blair off the Dialysis machine (a standard 70s plot device) is an example, along with (god bless her) Ms. Black, who I do regard fondly, but it's kinda hard to miss her eyes in this feature seem a little um... Well would you want a cross-eyed stewardess fling your plane? And Miss Gloria Swansong makes me think either of the Bugtussel Biltmore showing her last silent movie in the Beverly Hillbillies, or Carol Burnett as Nora Desmond (which I saw long before I ever saw Sunset Blvd.)

#11 of 48 OFFLINE   Matt Hough

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Posted May 27 2012 - 12:34 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by NY2LA /t/321003/double-features-for-a-cinema-or-movie-night#post_3930411 yeah I saw that one coming, And took it out when editing, apparently it stayed. I like the movie a lot too and wish it had got (along with Music Man) the kind of cool 2 disc packages My Fair Lady and Singin in the Rain got. I was told a funny story about how Merman had somehow got ahold of Roz's original vocal tracks and kept them for years to play at parties, where she would say something like "listen to that $&@*% &@%*! Ya call that singin?"
  Yes, I have heard that story about Ethel and Roz's vocals and I do believe it. And Roz's vocals do sound rather desperate to me, gamely struggling to deliver the goods without the vocal equipment to do so. But that's why Lisa Kirk's vocals are so sublime, superbly mated to Roz's speech (and an occasional note or two from her) that for many years, I had NO CLUE that it wasn't Roz singing the role.   I remember seeing Russell's movie Rosie some years after Gypsy and I couldn't understand when Roz was on the stage singing "Everybody Loves My Baby" for Sandra Dee why she didn't have that resonant voice I remembered from Gypsy. I suspect that's when I began to figure out maybe Roz didn't do all that great singing in Gypsy.

#12 of 48 OFFLINE   Billy Batson

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Posted May 27 2012 - 12:57 PM

That's funny, only the other night I had a double bill with The Omega Man & I Am Legend. Interesting to see the difference in styles in what is the same story. I like both of them, & they're great looking Blu's. I usually just look at the one movie in an evening, I just don't have the stamina for two, but a Saturday night it's good to live a little! I do like horror film double bills, a b/w followed by a colour, so that's a Universal followed by a Hammer or American International. A good one I could do (& I think I will) is, The Maltese Falcon followed by The Cheap Detective.

#13 of 48 OFFLINE   Peter M Fitzgerald

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Posted May 27 2012 - 01:41 PM

ONE MILLION YEARS BC and BARBARELLA... sexy sixties sirens simultaneously showcasing skimpy sportswear & supporting silly sci-fi scenarios splendidly, at both ends of the human timeline.

My Current Damage at DVD Aficionado

 

Check out my Film & TV Blog (established 5/5/15): Smoking Holes That Were Once My Eyes...


#14 of 48 OFFLINE   Charles Smith

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Posted May 27 2012 - 01:46 PM

Another double feature that played in L.A. a couple of times way back when, that I've always remembered fondly, was Gaslight and North by Northwest.  Those two together hit that perfect balance of great B&W drama/suspense and really superb color entertainment/suspense.

#15 of 48 OFFLINE   Bob Cashill

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Posted May 27 2012 - 08:05 PM

LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL LIFE STINKS

#16 of 48 OFFLINE   Danny Burk

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Posted May 27 2012 - 08:11 PM

Both versions of THE MALTESE FALCON (1931 and 1941) make a great comparison. Familiar and glossy with Bogart; fun pre-code sleaze in the lesser known original. If you're feeling really brave, you could add the 1936 version SATAN MET A LADY (basically the same story with a few twists)....many hate it, but I've always had a soft spot for it. And you get Warren William, Bette Davis, and Alison Skipworth as the Fat Lady!

#17 of 48 OFFLINE   Rob_Ray

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Posted May 27 2012 - 09:23 PM

MILLION DOLLAR LEGS and BUCK PRIVATES

#18 of 48 OFFLINE   Doctorossi

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Posted May 28 2012 - 03:45 AM

Well, for me the obvious would be Zero Hour and Airplane. My wife and I caught Zero Hour on TCM about 6 months ago. We had a great time comparing it to Airplane as we watched it. Almost the exact same movie.
And, of course, you can't do that without also doing Dr. Strangelove and Fail-Safe.

#19 of 48 OFFLINE   Charles Smith

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Posted May 28 2012 - 04:09 AM

Originally Posted by Billy Batson /t/321003/double-features-for-a-cinema-or-movie-night#post_3930505 That's funny, only the other night I had a double bill with The Omega Man & I Am Legend. Interesting to see the difference in styles in what is the same story. 
  Of course the proper triple-feature all-night drive-in extravaganza would be The Last Man on Earth, The Omega Man, and I Am Legend.

#20 of 48 OFFLINE   Yorkshire

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Posted May 28 2012 - 05:34 AM

10 Rillington Place vs Pierrepoint (U.S. Pierrepoint: The Last Hangman). The Island vs Never Let Me Go. Gandhi vs Jinnah. The Parallax View vs JFK. Jesus Christ Superstar vs The Last Temptation of Christ. If you want an obscue one: I Know Where I'm Going vs The Birds. Steve W
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