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Connecting Subwolfer to Yamaha HTC.


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#1 of 5 ccavna500

ccavna500

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Posted March 20 2012 - 12:57 AM

Hello All I have a Yamaha RX-V863 HTC and a RCA PRO-SW60P 60-Watt Powered. Subwoofer. I have for a very long time been trying to connect the HTC to the SW with no luck. It seems the HTC has only one rca Fem for SW and my SW has a dual neg and pos rca fem's along with right and left high freq pos and neg speaker connections. I have tried multiple way to connect but nothing seems to work. if anyone has any suggestgions i would grately appreciate it.

#2 of 5 Jason Charlton

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Posted March 20 2012 - 01:50 AM

Hi Chris, welcome to the forum!


Adding a subwoofer to your system really has two steps.  The first is to make the physical connection, the second is to properly configure the receiver so that it knows a subwoofer is connected.


Connecting the subwoofer is actually pretty straightforward in your case.  The subwoofer is self-powered, and your receiver has a subwoofer "pre-out" (also called a Low Level output).


All you need to do is connect a single RCA-style cable from the SW Output on the back of the receiver, to the "L" Low-level input on the back of the subwoofer.  Plug the subwoofer into the wall, and that should cover the connection part.


The speaker-wire connectors are only used if your receiver doesn't have a pre-out.


On the back of the subwoofer, you should dial the volume control to halfway, and dial the frequency knob all the way to maximum (200Hz) - you will use the crossover controls within the receiver instead of the crossover in the subwoofer.


Now, you have to set up the receiver to recognize that the subwoofer is there...


Your receiver has an automatic setup utility called YPAO (see manual p. 32) - as long as the subwoofer is connected and turned on when you connect the microphone and run the setup routine, it should recognize that it's there and send a test tone signal during the setup process.


If for some reason that doesn't produce any results, let us know and we can do some further troubleshooting.


Good luck!


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#3 of 5 ccavna500

ccavna500

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Posted March 20 2012 - 11:19 AM

Jason Thanks for the help I tried your suggestgion still with no success but I have found the solution and will need to wait until i have the funds to do so. It seems my Reciever has a digital output this is something a little new to me since im obviously still in the 90's thinking it was an analog connection. I will need to purchase a Digital RCA to Analog RCA wire to acheve my goal. I think my confusion was more of color coding since the Recievers out connection were black and the users manual is very veague on the connection of the subwoofer. I did at one time have the subwoofer working with the reciever a friend had rigged but i disasemled the system during a move and never figured out how he did it before I disconnected the subwoofer. I was hoping maybe there was another solution if anyone was familliar with the reciever enough to suggest something without having to buy new accessories using the ones i have on hand.

#4 of 5 Al.Anderson

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Posted March 20 2012 - 10:11 PM

It seems my Reciever has a digital output ...

You should not be using the digital out to connect to your subwoofer. You should use the subwoofer jack under the pre-out section in the top-middle of the receiver. What Jason said to do is correct, I suggest you re-read it. When the sub has both L/R RCA connections you usually connect the single sub wire to the left. The real "trick" is that the receiver does not send out a sub signal until the sub channel is turned on. So you have to go into the receiver options and tell it that you now have a sub connected. The better way to do this is to run the auto-config, but it can be done manually. (Especially useful if you just want to know the sub is connected correctly.)

#5 of 5 Jason Charlton

Jason Charlton

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Posted March 21 2012 - 01:01 AM

Chris,


Your reciever has two subwoofer pre-outs - labeled "1" and "2".  You can use either one, but it makes sense to use "1".


Looking at the back panel, I'm not even sure what "digital out" you're using - all I see is an optical output, and that's absolutely not what you want.  Can you tell me where on the back panel, the connection is that you're using?


Originally Posted by ccavna500 

I will need to purchase a Digital RCA to Analog RCA wire to acheve my goal.


There's really no such thing as a "digital" RCA cable or an "analog" RCA cable.  Some cables are made from RG-6 coaxial cable, which has a solid conductor and is less flexible than other cables made with RG-59 coaxial cable which has a stranded center conductor and is much more flexible.


RG-6 cables are better capable of handling high bandwidth transmission - 720p or 1080i video signals, for instance - than RG-59.  A subwoofer signal is nowhere NEAR as bandwidth-heavy as HD video, so RG-59 can work perfectly fine for carrying a subwoofer signal.


This bandwidth capacity difference may be why some folks refer to RG-6 cables as "digital" and RG-59 cables as "analog" but that's a REALLY poor choice of wording.  All video signals carried on component video cables, for example, are ANALOG!


The RCA connectors are another key factor in performance of coaxial cable. The connector's impedance should be as close to 75ohm as possible.  IMO, this has a much higher affect on a cable's performance than the cable itself - mostly when you're using the cable for video transmission.  Ghosting and other video anomalies can be the result of mismatched impedance on analog video cables.


What this all boils down to is that when it comes to a subwoofer cable, the demands on the cable itself are very small.  You don't need a beefy cable to carry a subwoofer signal.  All the discussion of wire type, connector impedance, shielding, etc. are completely moot unless you're talking about video.


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