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Technicolor monopack in 1945

Robert Harris

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#1 of 3 OFFLINE   Mark-P

Mark-P

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Posted February 21 2012 - 08:07 AM

I'd like to learn a little more about the introduction of single-strip Technicolor in the 1940s. We all know that 3-strip (and sequential exposure) were used by the motion picture industry well into the 1950s until it was replaced by Eastman color. What I have recently discovered is that (according to the Internet Movie Data Base) Son of Lassie (1945) was the first film shot in Technicolor's monopack process. What I'd like to know, is how many other "Technicolor" movies between 1945 and 1953 were monopack and not 3-strip?

#2 of 3 OFFLINE   Robert Harris

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Posted February 26 2012 - 04:09 AM



Originally Posted by Mark-P 

I'd like to learn a little more about the introduction of single-strip Technicolor in the 1940s. We all know that 3-strip (and sequential exposure) were used by the motion picture industry well into the 1950s until it was replaced by Eastman color. What I have recently discovered is that (according to the Internet Movie Data Base) Son of Lassie (1945) was the first film shot in Technicolor's monopack process. What I'd like to know, is how many other "Technicolor" movies between 1945 and 1953 were monopack and not 3-strip?


It was Kodachrome.


RAH


"All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible. This I did." T.E. Lawrence


#3 of 3 OFFLINE   Mark-P

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Posted February 26 2012 - 05:31 AM

Interesting. So Eastman Kodak broke into the movie business as early as 1945 (previously only used in 16mm, 8mm and still photography) but Technicolor still got full screen credit.

It was Kodachrome. RAH