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PHE Press Release: The Adventures of TinTin (3D Blu-ray)(Blu-ray Combo)


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#1 of 8 OFFLINE   Ronald Epstein

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Posted February 16 2012 - 04:08 AM


 

Ronald J Epstein
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#2 of 8 OFFLINE   Adam Gregorich

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Posted February 16 2012 - 07:49 AM

Missed this in the theater; think the kids would love it so I'm going for the 3D version!

#3 of 8 OFFLINE   Matt Hough

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Posted February 16 2012 - 08:30 AM

This was a huge hit in Europe but got a very lukewarm reception here. Looking forward to the 3D version.

#4 of 8 ONLINE   Neil Middlemiss

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Posted February 16 2012 - 09:28 AM

I loved it - especially in 3D. It was one of the most entertaining films of last year. The use of 3D is very well done and there is one particular action sequence that unfolds wonderfully in a single continuous take that I almost stood up and applauded. John Williams' score is a genuine highlight as well. Very much recommended (perhaps because of my European roots) :)
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#5 of 8 OFFLINE   Jeff F.

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Posted February 16 2012 - 10:42 AM

I enjoyed the film and also saw it in 3D, but my 6-year-old son was kind of bored. I'm not sure why, since the film had plenty of action, but he kept asking me when it was going to end.

#6 of 8 OFFLINE   Adam Gregorich

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Posted February 16 2012 - 11:20 AM



Originally Posted by Jeff F. 

I enjoyed the film and also saw it in 3D, but my 6-year-old son was kind of bored. I'm not sure why, since the film had plenty of action, but he kept asking me when it was going to end.



I was hoping to share it w/ my 6 year olds.  Other than boredom anything else I need to worry about as a parent?




#7 of 8 ONLINE   Neil Middlemiss

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Posted February 17 2012 - 04:07 AM

Adam - I would say no but I would say there are a couple of moments that might be a little scary (the realism of the animation style doesn't help) - Particularly on the ship - but overall, its fun and light though the story moves at a comparably slower (and less flashy) pace than Dreamworks or Pixar animations.




Originally Posted by Adam Gregorich 



I was hoping to share it w/ my 6 year olds.  Other than boredom anything else I need to worry about as a parent?






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#8 of 8 OFFLINE   Ronald Epstein

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Posted March 13 2012 - 01:26 AM

TRAILER




CLIP





STEVEN SPIELBERG

THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN


Q: Hi Steven. You, along with Peter Jackson, have been Tintin fans since you were kids. What is it about the character Tintin that has kept you fascinated over the decades and do you identify anything in yourself with him?

A: Tintin is an intrepid, tenacious reporter who often becomes more a part of the story than just a reporter reporting the news. What I identify with Tintin is that he does not take no for an answer and that’s the story of my life.


Q: After working with Peter on The Adventures of Tintin, what surprised you about him?

A: I was quite surprised at how patient and thoughtful Peter is. He doesn’t let anything rattle him to where he becomes locked in indecision. He’s a problem solver. He likes to look at a challenge from several different angles and then, very methodically, he makes the best choice to solve the problem.


Q: Peter says you bring "childish excitement" to a film set.

A: In a sense, Peter is right. I get very, very anxious on the set. I have a thousand ideas and I don’t censor myself. I wind up cutting some of them out in the editing room. If I was more like Peter, I would save myself a lot of footage, needless footage that I shoot and then don’t use later in the process. Peter does have a very good sense of seeing the big picture and finding the most expedient way into that image or that emotional moment. So, we were, in a way, I guess two code-breakers working on the enigma code trying to figure this movie out together and once I realized that we were just two sort of scientists in a lab trying to figure out how to make something work, there’s no ego, there’s no competition. It’s just, we’re both on the same page. Two huge Tintin fanboys just trying to bring this movie to you in a way that you will like.


Q: The motion-capture technology in The Adventures of Tintin is cutting-edge, but I'm sure the most important ingredients in making a movie for you remain the same. It's about the story, the plot and characters.

A: For me, I think five-minutes into watching this movie people will soon see that the medium is not the message, that the characters and the story and the plot is. If the movie is working, you'll forget if it’s 3D or whether it’s widescreen. If the movie doesn’t work, then immediately you start to pick apart whatever it is that has contributed to that. If any movie is working, hopefully how it was made will be the least of your concern. You’ll only want to have a good time.


Q: Do you work with actors in motion-capture differently than what you would on a traditional movie set? And, do you think the motion-capture suits and dots actors wear helps them become the character just as a costume or make-up on a regular movie set would?

A: I’ve always found that whether actors wear stylized makeup or wigs in a live-action movie or big costume drama, or are called upon to act in a western or be chased by dinosaurs, it does give them a sense of great ambience and environment and they kind of feel like they’re in a great court. But, what is most important is it all comes down to the actors looking each other in the eye. That’s where the truth is told and that’s where all the drama or the comedy happens. When you see Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis in Some Like It Hot, they’re dressed outlandishly and everything else, you know the truth of those performances is when they’re looking at each other, acting together. Actors just need each other to act together. All of that other stuff is forgotten. Our actors who wear motion-capture suits, they were wearing headgear with a little camera and dots on their faces. After laughing at each other for about 10 minutes and getting that out of their system, they then become performing characters. I think that is the secret of great acting: you have to bring your imagination to the party. You have to have a great imagination and you have to bring it every day when you’re working. Your imagination and your skills as an actor are what see you through, not what you’re wearing or where you are.


Q: How important is new technology to you when you make a movie in this digital era?

A: It may be a digital era in terms of certain kinds of movies, but it’s still an analog era in terms of telling a good story. That’s the most important thing. There’s nothing of greater importance to me or Peter than the story.


Q: You directed The Adventures of Tintin and Peter Jackson produced it. If there is a sequel, will you switch roles?

A: Hopefully, with success, Peter is scheduled to direct the second Tintin adventure which, by the way, does include the character Professor Calculus. I’m really looking forward to working with Peter as a producer and as a collaborator in the same way Peter has worked with me to support me in directing Tintin. He supported me in just about every creative decision from the beginning of this process to the end.


Q: You have been known to make films for yourself and you have been a huge Tintin fan since you were a kid. Is this the reason you wanted to make The Adventures of Tintin?

A: This movie, I made it for everyone. I mean, some movies I make for myself. I do that sometimes when the subject matter is very sensitive and very personal and I really can’t imagine that I’m an audience member. I would lose myself too much if I thought of myself as the audience. There are other types of genre films that I need to be able to direct from the audience, to be right next to you watching the picture being made and Tintin is just such a movie.


Q: 3D is not new, but we have seen an explosion in popularity with 3D in recent years with great 3D films and not so great 3D films. What do you think about 3D?

A: Not every movie, in my opinion, should be in 3D. There are a lot of stories I wouldn’t shoot in 3D. But, you know, there are movies that are perfect in 3D. I think the last great 3D movie I saw that really enhanced the experience for me - you’ll have to excuse me for mentioning a film I co-produced - it was the last Transformers which I think is the most amazing 3D experience I’ve seen since Avatar. But, 3D needs a trained eye. It can’t be done by everybody. People do 3D just for the sake of commercializing their movie another five or six percent and they don’t know really how to do it. They should care how to do it better by bringing other directors and collaborators into their lives to help teach and instruct how you really make a 3D movie because it’s not just like putting a new lens on a camera and forgetting it. It takes a lot of very careful consideration. It will change your approach to where you put the cameras. So, 3D isn’t for everybody.


Q: You have been outspoken about the how audiences are charged higher ticket prices to watch a 3D movie.

A:  I’m certainly hoping that 3D gets to the point where people do not notice it because once they stop noticing it, it just becomes another tool and an aid to help tell a story. Then maybe they can make the ticket prices comparable to a 2D movie and not charge such exorbitant prices just to gain entry into a 3D one, with the exception of IMAX, where we are getting a premium experience in a premium environment. I'm hoping someday there will be so many 3D movies that the point of purchase prices can come down which I think would be fair to the consumer.


Q: The Tintin books feature wonderful adventures, but there's also  a lot of narrative and subplots. Was that hard to include in the film?

A: In the Hergé books, there’s a lot of narrative, there’s a lot of, not only just adventure, but also there’s a lot of subplot. What made it delightful, I think, for Peter and I, is that in the middle of all this forward motion, we take time for the characters to have a relationship with each other. We take time for Captain Haddock to moan about, you know, what brought him to drink and close to ruination and we go back in the first movie to Captain Haddock’s ancestors so we get to know a lot about why Captain Haddock is the man he is today. We’re very concerned about keeping the narrative moving because Hergé was concerned about that too, but also, in honoring Hergé it was very important for this film to take little rest stops to get to know the different people involved.


Q: Do you have moments when you are on a film set and you discover something you thought would work doesn't?

A: I’ve got a lot of examples I can give you about moments where I thought something would work on film and it didn’t work, but I never came to that decision with the film half shot, where I was stuck on a runaway train and couldn’t jump off. On those occasions where I have admitted defeat, that this is not going to work, I haven’t embarked on that project and made that movie.


Peter Jackson interview


PETER JACKSON

THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN


Q: Hi Peter. There was a lot of excitement when it was announced you were teaming up with Steven Spielberg to make The Adventures of Tintin. Steven directed. You produced the film. What was it like for you working so closely with such a master and what is something you didn't know about him that you discovered while working on Tintin?

A: Well, the thing that really surprised me I guess is, thinking about Steven’s huge body of work and the incredible films that he’s made that have affected all of us, I thought that Steven would have a process. I was imagining that there would be a way in which Steven would make the movie and I was looking forward to seeing it. But, what I discovered, which was delightful in a way, is that Steven walks onto the set and it’s like the first time that he’s ever walked on a film set. I mean, he’s literally childish. I mean that in a positive way. There’s a childish excitement that Steven brings to it and an enthusiasm that I wasn’t expecting and it’s very inspiring.


Q: You are a big fan of the Tintin books. So is Steven. What was it like making a Tintin movie?

A: The problem is: How do you adapt these books that both Steven and I have loved for a long, long time and do them justice? That’s a problem because there’s obviously a million ways that you could not do that and so the problem is how to you do it and that’s what we’ve sort of worked on. It’s been fantastic.


Q: Filmmakers have had mixed success using motion-capture technology in recent years. What is it about motion-capture that excites you as a filmmaker?

A:  Motion-capture is not a genre. I mean it’s not a spaghetti western, for instance. Motion-capture is a tool and technique and what we tried to do is to really use both motion-capture and traditional animation. Steven and I are much more adept to live-action filmmaking. I mean, we can’t use computers. Either of us. I can hardly send e-mails. But, we wanted to be able to walk into this sort of virtual world that we created with the characters of Tintin and the locations and sets. We wanted to be able to pick up a virtual camera and shoot a live-action movie inside this strange, hybrid, photo-real world. It wasn’t the photo-real world that was important, it was the way in which we shoot a movie inside that world that we think the result is really interesting.


Q: One of the great characters of the Tintin stories is Professor Calculus. We don't see him in this movie. Will we see him in future sequels you do?

A: Calculus doesn’t yet make his appearance in the cinematic version of Tintin. But, obviously if we are lucky enough to do more Tintin movies, there’s a lot of stories that Calculus features in so we absolutely look forward to seeing him hopefully in the future.


Q: Can you talk about the importance of a character's eyes, whether it is Tintin, Gollum in Lord of the Rings or one of your other films. It seems that the key to making a character real starts with the eyes.

JACKSON: Well, when you’re casting a movie and when you’re shooting a film, the eyes are the most important feature of any performer. Any great actor knows how to use their eyes. As a filmmaker, I love shooting huge close-ups because its those eyes that mean so much to me. Way back when we were doing Lord of the Rings and we created Gollum and other characters in the computer, we built the eyes in a very scientific way. You study real eyes, you study how the light reflects in them, you study the back of the eye, you study the way irises reflect emotion. You go into great scientific detail, so with Gollum, and King Kong was another character who didn’t do a huge amount with his face but his eyes told you everything of what he was thinking, it was critical.  Obviously with Avatar the eyes were critical in there. So, our company (Weta) has really put a huge amount of research and development into the eyes. With Tintin,  just like with any other film, we had to create a cast and they had to be as expressive in the eyes as a live-action film.


Q:  Tintin is relentless. Would it be true to say to be a successful filmmaker you also have to be relentless?

A: It’s all about his determination. You never, ever, give up once you start something, once you’re on the trail of something you don’t stop and that’s what you have to go through when you’re making a movie too. Once the train is rolling you have to stick with it.


Q: When you make complex movies like Tintin or Lord of the Rings do you know how everything will unfold or are you constantly coming up against surprises and challenges in attempting to get your vision on the big screen?

A: I find that in the process of making a film you’re constantly discovering things that you never even imagined would work at the beginning. When I start a film I can sort of shut my eyes, sit somewhere quiet and imagine the movie finished. I can imagine the camera angles. I can even imagine the type of music without knowing the tune. But, in the process of making the film, you’re constantly discovering new things all of the time. I mean, actors come into the film and do things you never even imagined. Production designers come in, the director of photography lights it in a way that you never imagined. So, it’s always evolving, always exciting. In fact, with Tintin the process was even more stimulating because it begins with a very crude pre-visualization which is like a very simple piece of animation and then you slowly begin layering it and layering it. So, even though Tintin has taken Steven and I five or six years to get from the very beginning of the process to get where we are now, it’s been five or six absolutely dynamic years because literally every week we were seeing new things and new versions of shots that came to life and made us go, 'Oh, my God'. It’s exciting, it’s really exciting.


Q: How do you feel about the re-emergence of 3D?

A: I think the 3D situation is kind of interesting at the moment because, after Avatar, it survived for a while as this premium experience with higher ticket prices, but I think the audiences have now come to realize that there are bad movies that can be in 3D as well and, on top of that, you’re being charged an extra five dollars to see a movie that was as bad as when you saw it in 2D. I think that is being driven to some degree by the increased ticket prices, which is a shame and it’s kind of starting to backfire a little bit. I certainly believe that, with the right movie, 3D can enhance the experience. Absolutely, it can make a good film a great film. It can make a great film a really amazing film to see and that’s what I hang onto. But, certainly there’s the projection which is why this issue needs to be addressed. If 3D is to have a long-term future in cinema in the sense that it’s at all like when the CinemaScope was introduced in the 1950s and the surround sound and everything, these technological things are not new, it’s just another step forward, then something certainly has to be done about it in the pictures we are experiencing at the moment.



 

Ronald J Epstein
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