Jump to content



Sign up for a free account to remove the pop-up ads

Signing up for an account is fast and free. As a member you can join in the conversation, enter contests and remove the pop-up ads that guests get. Click here to create your free account.

Photo

Does gore in horror film show a lack of ability and talent?


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 of 10 OFFLINE   WaveCrest

WaveCrest

    Producer



  • 4,158 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 19 2008
  • Real Name:Richard

Posted November 17 2011 - 11:59 AM

Been meaning to start this thread for ages, as it's something which needed discussing. The question as the thread title stems from a Home Cinema @ The Digital Fix review of The Survivor (1980). Below is the link to the review:



The Survivor (1981) - Home Cinema @ The Digital Fix review



and an excerpt from the review which is the origin of this discussion:




The result, unfortunately is a bit of a mess. Ginnane and Hemmings decided early on to aim for a more cerebral horror film rather than for gore, believing that was where the fashion was going. But there's a reason why so many horror films go for gore: films which rely on atmosphere require more ability and talent to bring off.



The first example I can think of is the original Friday the 13th (1980). It takes some imagination to come up with the death scenes, and Tom Savini is one of the best in the horror genre. I don't believe they're taking the easy option, as when these horror franchise films have a formula and people know what to expect, coming up with something different in each entry I assume is difficult.



#2 of 10 ONLINE   TravisR

TravisR

    Studio Mogul



  • 23,078 posts
  • Join Date: Nov 15 2004
  • LocationThe basement of the FBI building

Posted November 17 2011 - 02:34 PM

Yeah, a movie doesn't live or die (no pun intended) on the level of graphic violence. I've seen effective movies that are extraordinarily violent and I've seen effective movies where all the violence is suggested and I've also seen very violent and non-graphic violent movies that are completely ineffective. In short, like almost everything in life, there's no black and white answer. :)

#3 of 10 OFFLINE   Eric_M

Eric_M

    Stunt Coordinator



  • 222 posts
  • Join Date: Dec 13 1999

Posted November 23 2011 - 12:09 PM

The first example I can think of is the original Friday the 13th (1980). It takes some imagination to come up with the death scenes, and Tom Savini is one of the best in the horror genre. I don't believe they're taking the easy option, as when these horror franchise films have a formula and people know what to expect, coming up with something different in each entry I assume is difficult.

In the case of Friday the 13th, it also takes ripping off the superior Bay of Blood. 9 out of 10 times you can only take these review sites so seriously and even less so when it tends to be a site that is not very knowledgeable or focused on any one genre. If the makers of Sole Survivor decided to make it a gore film it would defeat the entire purpose of what they were trying to make(supposedly it was inspired by Carnival of Souls). That's also a pretty generalized view by the reviewer to infer the reason so many horror films went right for the gore was a lack of talent or ability on the filmmakers part.

#4 of 10 OFFLINE   WaveCrest

WaveCrest

    Producer



  • 4,158 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 19 2008
  • Real Name:Richard

Posted November 26 2011 - 01:06 AM

Whether one horror film is superior or not to another film in the genre, is down to personal preference. Friday the 13th (1980) was or may have been an imitator of Halloween (1978) for example, but it was still a very good effort on a small budget.


Have seen Friday the 13th a few times now. but it still gives me the heebie-jeebies. Some of the death scenes weren't even shown on screen. One of those didn't use any gore, but it had an implied look to it.


Much prefer CGI not to be used in gory scenes in horror films. Prefer the use of plastics and puppets for example in the creation of death scenes.


Thanks for adding to the discussion.



#5 of 10 OFFLINE   ahollis

ahollis

    Producer



  • 6,026 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 01 2007
  • Real Name:Allen
  • LocationNew Orleans

Posted November 28 2011 - 02:56 AM

I prefer a horror film with less gore and more on scaring you with acting, directing and cinematography.  Two of the scariest films around are The Haunting (1963) and The Innocents (1961).  The Uninvited (1944)  leaves you with an eerie feeling also.  Of the 70's films, the original Halloween is pretty scary film and the blood is at a minimum and also the same with The Omen (1976).  While I dearly love the original Friday 13th and the next two sequels that followed, this was the beginning of the mainstream Horror/Gore film. The Herschell Gordon Lewis films of the 60's were, IMHO, not horror films, but gory, bloody films to shock the viewer and were great Drive-In programmers.   Nothing like a double feature of Two Thousand Maniacs and Blood Feast.  Just add Color Me Blood Red and you go a weekend winner at the ozoner.  And the concession stand did huge business even with the blood splattering the screen.

"Get a director and a writer and leave them alone. That`s how the best pictures get made" - William "Wild Bill" Wellman


#6 of 10 OFFLINE   Orlac35

Orlac35

    Auditioning



  • 1 posts
  • Join Date: Dec 02 2011

Posted December 02 2011 - 10:39 PM

HGLewis is basically grand guignol with worse actors! David Cronenberg is the defintie proof that mucho gore does not mean lack of intelligence.

#7 of 10 OFFLINE   Richard--W

Richard--W

    Producer



  • 3,527 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 20 2004

Posted December 05 2011 - 10:24 AM

Does gore in horror films show a lack of ability and talent?

Yes. 97% of the time.

#8 of 10 OFFLINE   SWFF

SWFF

    Screenwriter



  • 1,874 posts
  • Join Date: Jan 14 2010
  • Real Name:Shawn Francis
  • LocationUSA

Posted December 05 2011 - 10:50 AM

As a writer I'll say it is hard to pen a tale where the "gore" is suggested. That does, to some extent, take a certain talent. I'm still working towards that myself. Which is why I don't pay attention to 99.9% of the horror movies made these days that revolve around ghosts. Ghost movies are NOT about gore, they are about dread, which is also why my list of favorite ghost movies are slim as hell.

#9 of 10 OFFLINE   ScottHM

ScottHM

    Second Unit



  • 328 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 18 2003
  • Real Name:Scott
  • LocationUSA

Posted December 05 2011 - 10:51 AM

I refuse to watch gore-filled films, so I'll never know. ---------------

#10 of 10 OFFLINE   WaveCrest

WaveCrest

    Producer



  • 4,158 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 19 2008
  • Real Name:Richard

Posted December 05 2011 - 11:06 AM


Quote:

Originally Posted by ahollis ../..

I prefer a horror film with less gore and more on scaring you with acting, directing and cinematography.  Two of the scariest films around are The Haunting (1963) and The Innocents (1961).  The Uninvited (1944)  leaves you with an eerie feeling also.  Of the 70's films, the original Halloween is pretty scary film and the blood is at a minimum and also the same with The Omen (1976).  While I dearly love the original Friday 13th and the next two sequels that followed, this was the beginning of the mainstream Horror/Gore film. The Herschell Gordon Lewis films of the 60's were, IMHO, not horror films, but gory, bloody films to shock the viewer and were great Drive-In programmers.   Nothing like a double feature of Two Thousand Maniacs and Blood Feast.  Just add Color Me Blood Red and you go a weekend winner at the ozoner.  And the concession stand did huge business even with the blood splattering the screen.


Have never heard of The Uninvited (1964). Ray Milland being in the cast is an incentive to see it. The only other recognisable name in the cast (to me) is Alan Napier (Alfred the butler in the 60's TV series Batman).


A horror film not using much gore and one using a lot of the tomato sauce can both be effective. Films which don't use as much gore, combined with acting, cinematography, lighting and writing can make for very effective scares and atmosphere. Some franchise horror films may not always have the best of scripts, but (and maybe I'm being biased) the makers of these films do tick all the right boxes when it comes to a creating a scary atmosphere and setting, even with daylight scenes

(example being the killing of Ned in Friday the 13th (1980).



Having that eerie feeling helps a lot to create an effective horror film with not much gore. And the sense of foreboding, where you know something bad is afoot, but you can't quite put your finger on it, is another ingredient for an effective horror movie.


Halloween (1978) is perfect example of a horror film using the fear of shadows and suspense (the thought of not knowing where Michael Myers is, with the supernatural edge, makes the film a near perfect 10 out of 10 for me). A horror film need not have a lot of gore, when you can have a score/soundtrack which adds to the eerie atmosphere and mood of the setting.


Friday the 13th Part 2 (1981) upped the amount of gore on the first film. Have seen the 1980 original a few times, but this and the next nine films in the original series of Friday the 13th films not so much. That's not because I dislike the films, but because some films need to be savoured like a fine wine (you might think this is strange for a horror film or a B-movie picture, compared to a film in the drama genre). Have this thought that if I watch a horror film (either a gore-less or a gory horror film) too many times I'll get fed up of them. Yet if I see Friday the 13th (1980) in the TCM listings, will watch some of the film.


Don't think I've seen any Herschell Gordon Lewis films but Two Thousand Maniacs (1964) (looking at it's IMDb synopsis it does sound rather good) and Blood Feast (1963) ring a bell. Were the William Castle films, including those in the Region 1 boxset, particularly gory? Definitely going to get the set at some point, but I like to read people's comments on horror films I've not seen.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users