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Optoma HD33 3D-capable 1080p DLP Projector Review

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#1 of 30 OFFLINE   Todd Erwin

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Posted September 07 2011 - 07:26 AM

Optoma attempts to break the price barrier on 1080p 3D-capable projectors with the HD33, which carries an MSRP of $1499. With a few (minor) quibbles, this is a nice entry-level home theater projector.

 

Optoma HD33 3D-capable 1080p DLP Projector

  Specifications Display Technology: Single 0.65” DC2 1080p DMD DLP by Texas Instruments Native Resolution: 1080p (1920x1080) 2D/3D Brightness: 1800 ANSI Lumens Contrast Ratio: 4000:1 (Full On/Full Off) Lamp Life: 4000/3000 hours (STD/Bright) Throw Ratio: 1.5 to 1.8:1 (Distance/Width)   Note: Specifications are provided by the manufacturer and were not tested in this review for accuracy.     When discussing 3D for the home, most people think Plasma or LED-backlit LCD displays. One segment where 3D has been lacking is in front projectors. The few that have been available have been well-over $2000, and many are considered pro-sumer, available only from high-end home theater retailers, designers, and installers. Optoma just recently announced three projectors that are 3D capable. The HD8300 and the HD3300 are designed for the custom installation market, while the HD33 is aimed more at the home market.   Optoma was gracious to send an HD33 for review, and overall, I was quite pleased with its performance. Included in the box were a power cord, an RF Emitter for 3D Glasses, a backlit remote control with batteries, a lens cap, and a CD containing the Owners Manual. Although not included and sold separately (which sell for around $100/pair), Optoma did provide two pairs of rechargeable 3D active-shutter glasses for this review. The glasses were set aside overnight for initial recharging using the included micro-USB cables, using my cable HD-DVR’s USB ports.   Setup was fairly easy, and the projector has four adjustable feet, making it easy to use just about anywhere, including a table top. The projector can also be attached to a standard ceiling mount. The projector has 2x HDMI ports that are 1.4a compliant, a VGA port, as well as inputs for component and composite video. Since my Yamaha RX-V563 receiver does not support HDMI 1.4a, I connected my PlayStation 3 directly to the projector. After the projector warmed up, it took a few seconds for the PS3 and the HD33 to get a proper handshake. Once that was completed, I ran the automatic setup under Display Setup on the PS3, per the projector’s owners manual. This allowed the PS3 to detect the 3D capability of the projector. I then ran a simple calibration using Digital Video Essentials and the projector’s Cinema setting, with the lamp set to Bright. The good news is that with the Cinema setting, I only needed to tweak the contrast setting to -1. Everything else seemed to be near-perfect. Now it was time to watch some movies!   Unfortunately, Optoma’s frame interpolation, PureMotion, was factory-defaulted at High, causing all film-based content to have that queasy video or “soap opera” look to it. Worse, it accentuates any hand-held camera movement, adding additional queasiness. Luckily, there is a hot button on the remote allowing you direct access to the Pure menu to make adjustments, including turning PureMotion off entirely. The projector also features PureDetail, an edge enhancement tool, and PureColor, which increases the vividness of the image. I turned PureDetail to the OFF position, and PureColor to 3 (which is the half-way point).     I then viewed the opening sequence from Blade Runner: Final Cut, and was delighted with the amount of detail and richness of colors and black levels. I got the same outcome when viewing Kung Fu Panda, Coraline (in 2D), the episode Vegas from Stargate: Atlantis, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, and a few second season episodes of Vampire Diaries. I then proceeded to play some games on the PS3, including Sports Champions, Lego Star Wars, and Stardust HD. Response time was excellent, as was the overall picture quality. Connecting my cable HD-DVR provided mixed results, but the issues I saw were attributed more to the issues of watching highly compressed MPEG2 high defintion video on a large (approx. 72”) screen.   The next day, and the 3D glasses were fully charged and ready to use. I popped in a Panasonic 3D Demo Blu-ray that a friend loaned to me, and was very impressed at how vivid and realistic the 3D was, particularly with the clip from Avatar and the Summer Olympics highlights. Next, I watched the DTS-HD Master Audio 3D trailer from the DTS Demo Disc I received at CES last winter, and again was astonished. But enough demo material. It was time to look at some real-world 3D Blu-ray discs. I have to say, my initial reaction to Hoodwinked Too! was disappointing, but that had more to do with how that movie was converted to 3D. I had better results with Tron: Legacy (especially the trailer for Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides). But it was Open Season that really showed off the 3D capabilities of this projector. That disc exhibited tremendous depth while maintaining excellent contrast and vivid colors.   The glasses were fairly comfortable, and they use RF rather than IR to receive their sync signals from the projector. The advantage is not having to worry about line of sight issues with an IR transmitter. The RF Emitter uses VESA 3D technology, but the projector also supports DLP-Link 3D.   My cable company, Cox, does not offer any 3D channels currently in my area, but they do offer a few pay-per-view and free OnDemand movies, using the Top and Bottom technique, which can be easily chosen from the remote by pressing the 3D Format button and selecting it from the menu. My wife and I watched the IMAX 3D short Sigfried and Roy: The Magic Box. Unfortunately, due to the constraints of ATSC, the film had ghosting issues and compression artifacts.   The projector is rated at up to 1800 ANSI Lumens, so you do need a room with minimal ambient light. The throw distance on the HD33 is good, but requires a rather large room to get a fairly large image without having to place the projector against the back wall. Lamp life is rated at between 3000 and 4000 hours. Noise levels from the projector will vary based on the lamp settings. Standard mode with high altitude turned off was the quietest, and Bright mode with high altitude turned on obviously produced more fan noise. The projector also emits quite a bit of heat, so you may have to adjust the room temperature accordingly.   In the end, the Optoma HD33 is, for the money, an excellent entry-level 3D projector that is also an excellent 2D projector. It would be nice, though, if Optoma would include at least two pair of glasses if they are going to include the RF emitter with the projector. But that may put the projector at a slightly higher price point.

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Posted September 07 2011 - 02:35 PM

Thanks for the review.


On the 3D blu-ray content that you watched, did you ever notice any cross talk / ghosting?  How comfortable were the glasses after wearing them for an extended period of time?


#3 of 30 OFFLINE   Phoebus

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Posted September 08 2011 - 12:38 AM

I already use a 720p optoma with a 3d-xl conversion box - in my case converting my PS3 signal and any SBS broadcasting that my satellite box sees fit to transmit. This review notes that all the 3D is (projectorally) "in-house", but there are confusing noises coming from Optoma: "Requires the Optoma 3D-RF System - available separately" which ends up sounding like a 3D-XL for 1080p projectors, via its mystery and similar structure of title. The old projectors were 3D ready which led to some grumbling until the conversion box came out, these new projectors are FULL 3D 1080P and FULL HD 1080P. [Nobody should complain about the existance of a 3D-XL box whilst technology catches up with itself. In Jan 2010 they'd only just really finalised the specifications for Bluray 3D, whilst many of the 720p 3D ready projectors started retailing at much the same time.. The conversion box arrived to great fan popularity in Feb 2011.] So.. Optoma shouldn't be creating confusion for itself here, IMHO. What is a 3D-RF and why would it be seen/sold as an optional necessity?

#4 of 30 OFFLINE   dlbsyst

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Posted September 08 2011 - 04:39 AM

I already use a 720p optoma with a 3d-xl conversion box - in my case converting my PS3 signal and any SBS broadcasting that my satellite box sees fit to transmit. This review notes that all the 3D is (projectorally) "in-house", but there are confusing noises coming from Optoma: "Requires the Optoma 3D-RF System - available separately" which ends up sounding like a 3D-XL for 1080p projectors, via its mystery and similar structure of title. The old projectors were 3D ready which led to some grumbling until the conversion box came out, these new projectors are FULL 3D 1080P and FULL HD 1080P. [Nobody should complain about the existance of a 3D-XL box whilst technology catches up with itself. In Jan 2010 they'd only just really finalised the specifications for Bluray 3D, whilst many of the 720p 3D ready projectors started retailing at much the same time.. The conversion box arrived to great fan popularity in Feb 2011.] So.. Optoma shouldn't be creating confusion for itself here, IMHO. What is a 3D-RF and why would it be seen/sold as an optional necessity?

Just means that the Hd33 requires RF glasses -sold separately. It will also work with DLP Link glasses. This projector is getting high praises over at AVS Forum. They are saying that the 3D image that it throws is a substantial upgrade from the HD66/3D-XL combination. I have one ordered and it is all set for a Monday delivery.;)

#5 of 30 OFFLINE   Todd Erwin

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Posted September 08 2011 - 06:20 AM

I've attached a photo of the Optoma 3D-RF Emitter, which I was told ships with the projector, but the glasses are sold separately.


http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/


It is fairly small, not much bigger than a standard size SD card, but about 1/2-inch thick, and connects via a small cable. It will also work with the GT750 720p Gaming Projector, and that review is forthcoming.

Originally Posted by Phoebus 

I already use a 720p optoma with a 3d-xl conversion box - in my case converting my PS3 signal and any SBS broadcasting that my satellite box sees fit to transmit.

This review notes that all the 3D is (projectorally) "in-house", but there are confusing noises coming from Optoma:

"Requires the Optoma 3D-RF System - available separately"

which ends up sounding like a 3D-XL for 1080p projectors, via its mystery and similar structure of title.

The old projectors were 3D ready which led to some grumbling until the conversion box came out, these new projectors are FULL 3D 1080P and FULL HD 1080P.

[Nobody should complain about the existance of a 3D-XL box whilst technology catches up with itself. In Jan 2010 they'd only just really finalised the specifications for Bluray 3D, whilst many of the 720p 3D ready projectors started retailing at much the same time.. The conversion box arrived to great fan popularity in Feb 2011.]

So.. Optoma shouldn't be creating confusion for itself here, IMHO.

What is a 3D-RF and why would it be seen/sold as an optional necessity?







#6 of 30 OFFLINE   Todd Erwin

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Posted September 08 2011 - 06:26 AM

Kevin, I only noticed ghosting and crosstalk on Hoodwinked Too! (which I noted in my review of that title) and when watching Siegfried and Roy on Cox OnDemand. The crosstalk was minimized somewhat when I turned on the Sync Invert on the projector.


As for the glasses, they are not quite as comfortable as Panasonic's original glasses (at least when worn over normal eye glasses), but I managed to wear them without too much discomfort through my review screening of Hoodwinked Too! and about an hour of 3D gaming immediately thereafter. That would be about 2 1/2 hours.

Originally Posted by Kevin Collins 

Thanks for the review.


On the 3D blu-ray content that you watched, did you ever notice any cross talk / ghosting?  How comfortable were the glasses after wearing them for an extended period of time?







#7 of 30 OFFLINE   Phoebus

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Posted September 08 2011 - 09:35 AM

Thanks for this response! Again it is rather confusing to hear that one's old DLP link flicker glasses will work, along this newer system RF (radio frequencies??). Optoma don't seem to be selling this notion to reassure earlier buyers. Not too sure how RF improves matters - does this mean higher flicker rates than the 120Mhz DLP? As far as ghosting is concerned, I've seen little or none with my 720p set-up - the flicker is too accurate and speed of light goes on and off so fast there is little time for a polarised ghosted moment. I have owned a 1080p projector, but only for a month or so. I got greatly annoyed that South Pacific bluray didnt seem crisp enough for a harvested 70mm image. There was a sharpening menu option but I ended up with the sharpening right up with little change. I'd suggest a test with South Pacific blu to see how the auto sharpening feature copes with this. The 720p compressed a 1080p image in a way that suits me fine, so I'm not really complaining here. Optoma has left me with two projectors I love dearly - an SD and a HD one, the SD capable of projecting a lovely large 4:3 image from standard dvds! The HD fits my screen but is designed for widescreen and gives me a different kind of performance - including excellent 3D - so I have no desire to go the 3D HDTV route, certainly whilst the electronics is still developing quickly, hopefully towards a standardised format.

#8 of 30 OFFLINE   GregK

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Posted September 08 2011 - 10:56 AM

I like the fact that Optoma supports both RF and DLP-Link glasses. DLP Link has been around for a couple of years. I currently own four pair that I use with my Optoma HD66, and it would save me a lot of $$ if I could start out with DLP Link. Later down the road, I could switch to RF if I so desired. The ghosting part is troubling though, given DLP technology should "essentially" be ghost free. Todd, if I uploaded a 1080p 3D test pattern, could you play it full screen from a computer via HDMI to the HD33?

#9 of 30 OFFLINE   ManW_TheUncool

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Posted September 09 2011 - 12:13 AM

Thanks for the review, Todd.


Sounds quite enticing.


Too bad I'm not actually in the market for a big new display (yet?) even though I plan to be moving in the not-too-distant future and might finally have a good size room I can use w/ well enough ambient light control.


I may at some point consider FP again if/when my Sammy 61" LED DLP dies -- these things just don't seem as durable/reliable as originally thought, and I just had to replace its dead red LED myself last week, which seems to be a somewhat common issue for them.  And this Optoma unit (or maybe its eventual successor, if it takes me a long while) sounds very nice and would probably come close enough to my likely price range.


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#10 of 30 OFFLINE   Phoebus

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Posted September 09 2011 - 12:19 AM

Thanks for the review, Todd.


Sounds quite enticing.


Too bad I'm not actually in the market for a big new display (yet?) even though I plan to be moving in the not-too-distant future and might finally have a good size room I can use w/ well enough ambient light control.


I may at some point consider FP again if/when my Sammy 61" LED DLP dies -- these things just don't seem as durable/reliable as originally thought, and I just had to replace its dead red LED myself last week, which seems to be a somewhat common issue for them.  And this Optoma unit (or maybe its eventual successor, if it takes me a long while) sounds very nice and would probably come close enough to my likely price range.


_Man_


One should never forget the price of bulbs with a projector nor the need to replace them when they go pop. Thankfully with both my Optomas I've yet to change my first bulb, to date.

#11 of 30 OFFLINE   ManW_TheUncool

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Posted September 09 2011 - 12:35 AM


Originally Posted by Phoebus 

One should never forget the price of bulbs with a projector nor the need to replace them when they go pop.

Thankfully with both my Optomas I've yet to change my first bulb, to date.


True that although I would probably be using it mainly just for movies and concert-type programs (and maybe the occasional sporting event/party), not for much of anything else, so one bulb should likely last a long time (barring defect or such).  Certainly wouldn't be putting nearly as many hours on it as my current DLP RPTV, which has been used for pretty much everything in our livingroom.  If I go the FP route at some point, would probably use something else smaller (maybe a fairly inexpensive 40" plasma or LCD) for other stuff.  Actually, I'm already planning on using something smaller (than the DLP RPTV) for lesser content in the livingroom area -- and putting the DLP RPTV in a separate HT/entertainment room when we move.


OTOH, maybe at some point after the move, I should consider selling the LED DLP RPTV to move to FP, if I can get a decent return on the sale...  Hmmm...  Maybe something worth considering...


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#12 of 30 OFFLINE   Todd Erwin

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Posted September 09 2011 - 06:54 AM

As I said to Kevin, I only noticed the ghosting and crosstalk on those two titles (Hoodwinked Too! and Siegfried and Roy). The other 3D titles I used in my review did not exhibit any issues.

Originally Posted by GregK 

The ghosting part is troubling though, given DLP technology should "essentially" be ghost free. Todd, if I uploaded a 1080p 3D test pattern, could you play it full screen from a computer via HDMI to the HD33?







#13 of 30 OFFLINE   Todd Erwin

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Posted September 09 2011 - 06:56 AM

Which is why I will eventually be replacing my DLP TV with either a Plasma or LED/LCD display the next time the bulb fails.

Originally Posted by Phoebus 

One should never forget the price of bulbs with a projector nor the need to replace them when they go pop.

Thankfully with both my Optomas I've yet to change my first bulb, to date.







#14 of 30 OFFLINE   ManW_TheUncool

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Posted September 09 2011 - 08:01 PM


Originally Posted by Toddwrtr 
Which is why I will eventually be replacing my DLP TV with either a Plasma or LED/LCD display the next time the bulb fails.


I can't really imagine going smaller to a flat panel that doesn't necessarily yield substantial PQ improvement (unless it's out of some sort of necessity) though.  How much is your true cost of ownership on that DLP RPTV?  Are the bulb replacements really that expensive to offset (or overtake) the higher buy-in cost of flat panels?


IIRC, Samsung's DLP bulbs tend to run in the ~$150 range (at least for TV models that were out for more than a couple years).  If each bulb lasts ~3 years, you probably only need to buy 2 bulbs (maybe 3, if one dies prematurely) during the set's useful life before it's time to move to something else better (or the set dies of some other cause, especially these days w/ how unreliable these things have become).  I guess there's also the likelihood of needing to replace the color wheel (at least for Samsung sets).


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#15 of 30 OFFLINE   Todd Erwin

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Posted September 10 2011 - 08:52 AM

What I have is an older Toshiba rear projection DLP. I can find replacement bulbs for under $200, but found the quality of those bulbs vary greatly, even within a "manufacturer." The other problem with my set is that it is an energy hog, even when in standby mode. Toshiba thought it was a good idea to constantly have a fan running to keep the internal tuner cool, which translates to 35w when the set is not being used.


I've also just moved into a house with a much smaller living room, so my 56" seems too "in your face" with it sitting on the TV stand, although I'm thinking of a 55" plasma or LED/LCD. The HD66 provides a nice-sized screen, approx 68", but the screen is mounted to the wall.

Originally Posted by ManW_TheUncool 



I can't really imagine going smaller to a flat panel that doesn't necessarily yield substantial PQ improvement (unless it's out of some sort of necessity) though.  How much is your true cost of ownership on that DLP RPTV?  Are the bulb replacements really that expensive to offset (or overtake) the higher buy-in cost of flat panels?


IIRC, Samsung's DLP bulbs tend to run in the ~$150 range (at least for TV models that were out for more than a couple years).  If each bulb lasts ~3 years, you probably only need to buy 2 bulbs (maybe 3, if one dies prematurely) during the set's useful life before it's time to move to something else better (or the set dies of some other cause, especially these days w/ how unreliable these things have become).  I guess there's also the likelihood of needing to replace the color wheel (at least for Samsung sets).


_Man_








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Posted October 04 2011 - 04:34 PM

Hi Todd,


I know you didn't call this out in the review, but was their any light leakage in the room from the PJ?  One of the issues with PJ's particularly entry level PJ's is light leakage.

While I understand that fan noise will vary based on the brightness of the bulb, do you have any db ratings for noise at 1' from the PJ to measure the difference levels?  Alternatively, can you state the annoyance factor of fan noise on the setting you used when listening to movies with very low noise segments?


The pictures that are in the review seem to indicate that the fan is on the vents are on the left side of the projector.  Does the air vent in an out on the same side or does it go from one side to the other.  If so, which side does it exit from?





#17 of 30 OFFLINE   ManW_TheUncool

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Posted October 05 2011 - 05:49 AM

Originally Posted by Toddwrtr 

What I have is an older Toshiba rear projection DLP. I can find replacement bulbs for under $200, but found the quality of those bulbs vary greatly, even within a "manufacturer." The other problem with my set is that it is an energy hog, even when in standby mode. Toshiba thought it was a good idea to constantly have a fan running to keep the internal tuner cool, which translates to 35w when the set is not being used.


I've also just moved into a house with a much smaller living room, so my 56" seems too "in your face" with it sitting on the TV stand, although I'm thinking of a 55" plasma or LED/LCD. The HD66 provides a nice-sized screen, approx 68", but the screen is mounted to the wall.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ManW_TheUncool 

I can't really imagine going smaller to a flat panel that doesn't necessarily yield substantial PQ improvement (unless it's out of some sort of necessity) though.  How much is your true cost of ownership on that DLP RPTV?  Are the bulb replacements really that expensive to offset (or overtake) the higher buy-in cost of flat panels?


IIRC, Samsung's DLP bulbs tend to run in the ~$150 range (at least for TV models that were out for more than a couple years).  If each bulb lasts ~3 years, you probably only need to buy 2 bulbs (maybe 3, if one dies prematurely) during the set's useful life before it's time to move to something else better (or the set dies of some other cause, especially these days w/ how unreliable these things have become).  I guess there's also the likelihood of needing to replace the color wheel (at least for Samsung sets).


_Man_



Ouch!  35W in standby?  Actually, that was partly why I decided to give away my then-several-yo Panny CRT-RPTV to upgrade to my current Sammy LED DLP rather than put in some effort (and maybe pay an ISF tech) to bring it back up to quality -- it had developed a slight bit of 4x3 burn-in from too many late-nights when I dozed off watching Conan O'Brien, and I hate using stretch modes.  In my case, the old OTA STB I was using was eating ~20W(?) in standby (and just 1 more watt in actual use), and it was starting to get flakey anyway w/ not a whole lot of good alternatives amongst STBs.  Although 20W doesn't seem like much, given Con Ed's rates in NYC, it can add up over time going 24/7, and it really doesn't make sense to be so wasteful w/ an OTA STB anyway -- that plus the old RPTV itself was eating a good deal more power than the LED DLP anyway.


RE: the variability of bulb quality, hadn't realized that.  But yeah, I can see that being a real issue.  Fortunately for me, the LEDs *should* in theory last the life of the set for us so that shouldn't become an issue, but so far, I've already had to replace the red LED (after 2.5 years) due to what seems like a relatively common issue w/ those handful of LED DLP models that Samsung made.  And fortunately, that's the only issue for me so far, and my DIY attempt at the replacement went fairly smoothly w/ the set working like new since I did that about a month ago.  I'm kinda dreading though that I might run into issues if/when I finally decide to take the plunge on some 3D glasses to make use of the set's 3D capabilities -- I can see it now: opt for 4 pairs of DLP-link 3D glasses only to find out the set's mainboard has malfunctioned in such a way as to render it 3D-incapable so I'd need to either resell the glasses or buy another DLP-based display to use them... Posted Image  Never say never and all that, but I'm thinking "never" gonna buy another Samsung branded product again...


Anyway, I'll probably keep an eye on how these entry-level FPs develop going forward...


Thanks again.


Cheers!


_Man_



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#18 of 30 OFFLINE   Todd Erwin

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Posted October 05 2011 - 09:16 AM

Light leakage from both the HD33 and GT750 were minimal, and the noise level wasn't too bad on either, as well.


Both projectors pulled in air from the left and passed through on the right. The heat was more of an annoyance than the noise.


The projectors have now been packed up and shipped back to the manufacturer since the reviews have posted, so I can't do any other testing. Which means my old Toshiba energy hog has been placed back into service...... Posted Image

Originally Posted by Kevin Collins 

Hi Todd,


I know you didn't call this out in the review, but was their any light leakage in the room from the PJ?  One of the issues with PJ's particularly entry level PJ's is light leakage.

While I understand that fan noise will vary based on the brightness of the bulb, do you have any db ratings for noise at 1' from the PJ to measure the difference levels?  Alternatively, can you state the annoyance factor of fan noise on the setting you used when listening to movies with very low noise segments?


The pictures that are in the review seem to indicate that the fan is on the vents are on the left side of the projector.  Does the air vent in an out on the same side or does it go from one side to the other.  If so, which side does it exit from?









#19 of 30 OFFLINE   gani

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Posted October 06 2011 - 03:07 AM

thanks very much for the review(s), but i am really missing your subjective comparison of the gt750 and the hd33. i currently could have the hd33 for just a little bit more than the gt750, but many years ago i had a bad experience with a projector with very bad detail in the darker areas, and... generally no black level to speak of. in Art Feierman's review pictures (after calibration) of the hd33 seem to have a lot less detail than that of the gt750 (train in the woods example), but i just found the uncalibrated pictures of the hd33 as well, and there i see that much more detail than in the calibrated pictures is possible, probably at the cost of black levels. also, for the review they never calibrated the gt750. so... how fare the two compared to each other after your reviews? thanks very much in advance for a quick reply, if possible, since i dont know if that low price for the hd33 stays for long in my currency. edit: corrected hd750 instead of gt750

#20 of 30 OFFLINE   ManW_TheUncool

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Posted October 06 2011 - 06:07 AM

Hi, Gani.


First of all, welcome to the forum!


Don't know what review you're refering to, but since you mentioned pictures of the presumably projected image, I would probably want to know exactly how reliable such pictures really are.  Photographing a projected image to present an accurate representation of what's actually visible in person is no small task at all, and I have my doubts that most any web based reviewer has the know-how to do that well enough to yield highly reliable comparisons.


Note that we're not talking about direct digital still frame captures from a BD/DVD, but presumably, shooting what's projected on a screen w/ the use of a quality still camera (that will essentially "see" the image as very dim) and then processing and presenting it on the web to be viewed on your computer.  That's adding at least 2 whole new layers of complication (ie. the photographic capture and processing plus the web presentation) to yielding an accurate final representation of how the projectors actually perform.  Whoever's handling the photography and processing for web presentation will need to be someone w/ a pro level of photographic and post-processing skills rather similar to say an ISF tech who calibrates displays.  And *then*, on top of that, *you* have to make sure your own computer and display have been calibrated to present the web images accurately as well -- this latter part would be necessary for faithful presentation/comparisons of any kind of accurate web images, including digital still frame captures from a BD/DVD.


So yeah, w/out knowing how accurate those review pics are *and* how accurate your own web display device (and well controlled your viewing environment) is, we won't know how reliable the comparisons are that you're seeing.


That's why ideally you need to see the display in action in your own intended viewing environment (or one that's essentially identical to yours) in order to know how it will really perform for you in actual practice -- and the same actually goes for audio gear as well.


Hope that helps some...


_Man_



Just another amateur learning to paint w/ "the light of the world".

"Whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is of good repute, if there is any excellence and if anything worthy of praise, dwell on these things..." (St. Paul)





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