Jump to content



Sign up for a free account to remove the pop-up ads

Signing up for an account is fast and free. As a member you can join in the conversation, enter contests and remove the pop-up ads that guests get. Click here to create your free account.

Photo

Warner Brothers 3-D


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
91 replies to this topic

#1 of 92 OFFLINE   Richard--W

Richard--W

    Producer



  • 3,527 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 20 2004

Posted August 29 2011 - 05:55 AM

http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ Isn't it time Warner Brothers led the charge into 3-D Blu-ray? Warner Brothers produced several state-of-the-art stereoscopic films in 1953 and 1954. They also control distribution for stereoscopic films made by other studios. http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/

#2 of 92 OFFLINE   Matt Hough

Matt Hough

    Executive Producer



  • 11,459 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 24 2006
  • LocationCharlotte, NC

Posted August 29 2011 - 08:41 AM

I would buy every single one of these on 3D if Warners would make them available. They truly have the cream of the crop in terms of quality 3D titles from the first 3D period, and I wish vault titles sold more strongly so these would be done deals.


#3 of 92 OFFLINE   Charles Smith

Charles Smith

    Producer



  • 4,236 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 27 2007
  • LocationNor'east

Posted August 29 2011 - 08:46 AM

Same.  Every one of them.  SOLD.  Which a lot of us have been saying for at least the past year.



#4 of 92 OFFLINE   Mike Wadkins

Mike Wadkins

    Supporting Actor



  • 956 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 22 2004

Posted August 29 2011 - 09:26 AM

Green Lantern looks to be a test case for them

#5 of 92 OFFLINE   Ronald Epstein

Ronald Epstein

    Studio Mogul



  • 40,265 posts
  • Join Date: Jul 03 1997

Posted August 29 2011 - 09:33 AM



Green Lantern looks to be a test case for them



Certainly not a test case.


Warner has already released a handful of 3D titles that include:


Polar Express

Clash of the Titans

Yogi Bear

Cats and Dogs: Revenge of Kitty Galore


And Imax releases that include


Space Station 3D

Under The Sea

Deep Sea



Warner has already led the brigade on 3D releases -- probably one
of the very first studios to do so.


But I do see the point the original author is trying to make.  He wants

classic 3D releases to see the light of day.


I do think House of Wax is in the works for release.  I would have to

check again, but I think George Feltenstein announced it at Comic-Con.


(Please, before anyone spreads that rumor check the video from The

Digital Bits Comic-Con panel to confirm)


If that is the case, the success of that sale will ultimately decide the

fate of the other classic releases.   You know the environment we live

in these days.  Classic fare seems very hard to sell.


 

Ronald J Epstein
Home Theater Forum co-owner

 

 Click Here for the latest/hottest Blu-ray Preorders  Click Here for our complete Blu-ray review archive

 Click Here for our complete 3D Blu-ray review archive Click Here for our complete DVD review archive

 Click Here for Blu-Ray Preorder Release Schedule  Click Here for forum posting rules and regulations


#6 of 92 OFFLINE   Richard--W

Richard--W

    Producer



  • 3,527 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 20 2004

Posted August 29 2011 - 11:07 AM

Classic 3-D films will NOT be hard to sell. 3-D is an attraction in and of itself, an added incentive, like the name of a movie star, to buy the Blu-ray. Now that the home viewing technology is available, EVERYBODY wants to see them. People have WANTED to see these films in 3-D for A LONG TIME. Classic 3-D films will prove more popular in 3-D than the flat versions as 3-D players and displays become more widespread. The studios are holding back on these titles much too long. They could have made a lot of money from them during the field-sequential phase. The hardware and DVDs would have helped to sell each other. Watching classic 3-D films will also give home video enthusiasts a new perspective on current stereoscopic films in general. The older films are much better, technically and visually and even dramatically, than most people realize. Since no classic stereoscopic films are available on Blu-ray, I don't see how you can conclude they are a hard sell.

#7 of 92 OFFLINE   SilverWook

SilverWook

    Screenwriter



  • 1,532 posts
  • Join Date: Oct 11 2006

Posted August 29 2011 - 12:39 PM

Some limited theatrical reissues would raise the profile of these films among consumers and create demand. (And it's not like they have to make prints now.) House of Wax and some others would be perfect around Halloween!

#8 of 92 OFFLINE   JohnMor

JohnMor

    Producer



  • 3,422 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 06 2004
  • Real Name:John Moreland
  • LocationLos Angeles, CA

Posted August 29 2011 - 01:44 PM



Originally Posted by Richard--W 

Classic 3-D films will NOT be hard to sell.
3-D is an attraction in and of itself, an added incentive, like the name of a movie star, to buy the Blu-ray.
Now that the home viewing technology is available, EVERYBODY wants to see them.
The older films are much better, technically and visually and even dramatically, than most people realize.

Since no classic stereoscopic films are available on Blu-ray, I don't see how you can conclude they are a hard sell.



I think that is overstated. Not "EVERYBODY" wants to see them.  I have many friends and family members who rushed to see Johnny Depp in 3-D in Alice in Wonderland (and other recent 3-D movies) who have ZERO interest in seeing House of Wax or KIss Me Kate or Dial M For Murder.  The classics in general are too slow and hokey for them, even in 3-D. And most of those 3-D classics are pretty mediocre films anyway.  Even in 3-D, they'd be strictly for the classics lovers mostly.



#9 of 92 OFFLINE   Bob Gu

Bob Gu

    Supporting Actor



  • 616 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 17 2006

Posted August 29 2011 - 02:22 PM

George Feltenstein talked about Warner's 2012 3-D plans, in this radio interview, which I think is from April/May 2011. He mentions HOUSE OF WAX, DIAL M FOR MURDER, THE BOUNTY HUNTER, and THE CHARGE AT FEATHER RIVER. The 3-D talk is in the last 6 minutes of the interview: INSIDE THE WALLS OF THE WARNER ARCHIVE: http://www.wmpg.org/...dvdclassics.htm

#10 of 92 OFFLINE   Richard--W

Richard--W

    Producer



  • 3,527 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 20 2004

Posted August 29 2011 - 02:25 PM

JohnMor: Perhaps a slight exaggeration, but you don't mind if the many people who love classic films and buy classic films get their 3-D classics, do you. The membership of HTF appreciates classic films and buys them. I've been to repertory screenings and witnessed newcomers being won over by classic 3-D films. In fact the World 3-D Expos in Los Angeles and its many off-shoots contributed greatly to the industry's re-acceptance of stereoscopic cinema as well as to audiences renewed enthusiasm for it. I was in the theater and meeting the industry-players who came to find out what classic 3-D had to offer. Besides, the crowd you're referring to isn't interested in much of anything except the newest and the shiniest and the coolest so they can be dismissed from any further consideration. Objectively speaking, Burton's Alice In Wonderland is a shallow mediocrity and an unpleasant exercise in the infantile and in fetishism. House of Wax, Kiss Me Kate, and Dial M For Murder may be older, but they are infinitely better crafted in all respects, and much better films. They also integrate stereopsis for storytelling instead of as a mere special effect. In other words, the 3-D in 1954 is superior in quality to Burton's neurotic and glossy piece of junk.

#11 of 92 OFFLINE   Richard--W

Richard--W

    Producer



  • 3,527 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 20 2004

Posted August 29 2011 - 02:41 PM

George Feltenstein talked about Warner's 2012 3-D plans, in this radio interview, which I think is from April/May 2011. He mentions HOUSE OF WAX, DIAL M FOR MURDER, THE BOUNTY HUNTER, and THE CHARGE AT FEATHER RIVER. The 3-D talk is in the last 6 minutes of the interview: INSIDE THE WALLS OF THE WARNER ARCHIVE: http://www.wmpg.org/...dvdclassics.htm

Thanks for the link. This is encouraging news. I like George Feltenstein enthusiasm. He says what I said in my response to JohnMor above. Let's hope Warner Brothers follows through with more 3-D releases and encourages other studios to do the same. It's not a good idea for the studios to suppress their stereoscopic classics any longer. There is money to be made now.

#12 of 92 ONLINE   dana martin

dana martin

    Screenwriter



  • 1,931 posts
  • Join Date: Oct 28 2003
  • Real Name:Dana Martin
  • LocationNorfolk, VA

Posted August 29 2011 - 02:45 PM



Originally Posted by JohnMor 





I think that is overstated. Not "EVERYBODY" wants to see them.  I have many friends and family members who rushed to see Johnny Depp in 3-D in Alice in Wonderland (and other recent 3-D movies) who have ZERO interest in seeing House of Wax or KIss Me Kate or Dial M For Murder.  The classics in general are too slow and hokey for them, even in 3-D. And most of those 3-D classics are pretty mediocre films anyway.  Even in 3-D, they'd be strictly for the classics lovers mostly.



i think that some might disagree that those three titles are MEDIOCRE films



Playing at the Drive In

Quote:Welles, Kubrick, Hitchcock, Spielberg, Jackson, Wood ?? a true Auteur should be one who follows his artistic vision

#13 of 92 ONLINE   Bob Cashill

Bob Cashill

    Screenwriter



  • 2,205 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 15 2001

Posted August 29 2011 - 02:50 PM

I'd strongly disagree with that statement., having seen and enjoyed all three of them in 3D. Besides, there's not a huge pool of 3D movies out there; sooner or later the studios, including Warner, will have to plumb their vaults for content.

#14 of 92 OFFLINE   Richard--W

Richard--W

    Producer



  • 3,527 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 20 2004

Posted August 29 2011 - 03:19 PM

Warner Brothers also controls RKO's stereoscopic films, which George Feltenstein talks about in the interview cited above. Perhaps WB will accelerate the program and release these as well: http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ There is always room for a cartoon in the supplements: http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/ I've seen all these films projected in authentic double-interlock, by the way. The left-eye and right-eyes exist and have been restored.

#15 of 92 OFFLINE   JohnMor

JohnMor

    Producer



  • 3,422 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 06 2004
  • Real Name:John Moreland
  • LocationLos Angeles, CA

Posted August 29 2011 - 04:54 PM



Originally Posted by Richard--W 


JohnMore:
Perhaps a slight exaggeration, but you don't mind if the many people who love classic films and buy classic films get their 3-D classics, do you. The membership of HTF appreciates classic films and buys them. I've been to repertory screenings and witnessed newcomers being won over by classic 3-D films. In fact the World 3-D Expos in Los Angeles and its many off-shoots contributed greatly to the industry's re-acceptance of stereoscopic cinema as well as to audiences renewed enthusiasm for it. I was in the theater and meeting the industry-players who came to find out what classic 3-D had to offer. Besides, the crowd you're referring to isn't interested in much of anything except the newest and the shiniest and the coolest so they can be dismissed from any further consideration.

Objectively speaking, Burton's Alice In Wonderland is a shallow mediocrity and an unpleasant exercise in the infantile and in fetishism.House of WaxKiss Me Kate, and Dial M For Murder may be older, but they are infinitely better crafted in all respects, and much better films. They also integrate stereopsis for storytelling instead of as a mere special effect. In other words, the 3-D is better than Burton's glossy piece of junk.


I completely agree Richard--W.  But my point is those of us that feel that way and hang out at HTF are not "everybody" and not even the core group that the studios cater to.


I loathed Alice in Wonderland, but it was a huge hit and the CORE audience that made it so isn't interested that much in classics.  They're the same bozos who refuse to watch anything in black & white.




Originally Posted by dana martin 





i think that some might disagree that those three titles are MEDIOCRE films



Some, but not too many probably.  I didn't say they were bad, just mediocre.  I don't know too many fans of horror, musicals or Hitchcock who place those films at the pinnacles of their respective genres.  They're usually ranked in the middle, neither the best nor worst of their genres, hence mediocre.




#16 of 92 OFFLINE   Richard--W

Richard--W

    Producer



  • 3,527 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 20 2004

Posted August 29 2011 - 05:03 PM

People who are acquainted with Dial M For Murder, House of Wax, and Kiss Me Kate consider them excellent films. Outstanding films. I know cinematographers who consider them to be superior stereoscopic films and who study them for that reason. To say that they are mediocre or "ranked in the middle" is just nonsense.

#17 of 92 OFFLINE   Richard--W

Richard--W

    Producer



  • 3,527 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 20 2004

Posted August 29 2011 - 05:10 PM

In the interview with George Feltenstein linked above, Mr. Feltenstein says that WB controls the Popeye cartoons originally released by Paramount, and that they may release this remarkable 3-D cartoon next year: http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/

#18 of 92 OFFLINE   JohnMor

JohnMor

    Producer



  • 3,422 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 06 2004
  • Real Name:John Moreland
  • LocationLos Angeles, CA

Posted August 29 2011 - 05:12 PM



Originally Posted by Richard--W 

People who are acquainted with Dial M For Murder, House of Wax, and Kiss Me Kate consider them excellent films. Outstanding films. I know cinematographers who consider them to be superior stereoscopic films and who study them for that reason.

To say that they are mediocre or "ranked in the middle" is just nonsense.


That's fine Richard--W.  Most Hitchcock fans and critics I know do not rank Dial M For Murder at the top of his canon, along with Vertigo and Psycho. It usually ranks in the middle of his list of films.  Just as most musical fans and critics I know don't consider Kiss Me Kate in the same league with West Side StorySinging in the Rain or The Sound of Music.  And most horror fans and critics I know don't count House of Wax with The Silence of the Lambs and Halloween. This isn't a personal attack on the films or people who enjoy them (as I do.)    



#19 of 92 OFFLINE   Douglas Monce

Douglas Monce

    Producer



  • 5,514 posts
  • Join Date: Nov 16 2006

Posted August 29 2011 - 05:16 PM

If Warner released those films, that would actually get me to consider investing in 3D equipment. Add the classic Universal 3D films and I'd be sold. Doug
"I'm in great shape, for the shape I'm in."
Bob Hope in The Ghostbreakers

#20 of 92 OFFLINE   Billy Batson

Billy Batson

    Screenwriter



  • 1,464 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 19 2008
  • Real Name:Alan
  • LocationLondon

Posted August 29 2011 - 10:12 PM

Maybe to sweeten the deal, a double bill, House Of Wax & The Phantom Of The Rue Morgue. That would be a fun evenings viewing. I think Hondo is Paramount now.