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Ender's Game gets a movie deal


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#41 of 107 DaveF

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Posted May 04 2013 - 05:20 AM

Well, that was a big tease!

I'm not super excited about the use of modern superhero gymnastics for how the children move in the battle room, but ok, that's the current style.

Looking forward to the full trailer.

#42 of 107 Brandon Conway

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Posted May 04 2013 - 08:40 AM

They are weightless in the battle room, so I don't see how they could avoid the motion of that if they wanted to do it proper.


"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#43 of 107 DaveF

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Posted May 04 2013 - 08:15 PM

For me the book suggests a different form of power and motion than the super heroics used in current movies and the little bit of a teaser suggests.

I could be wrong, making too much of nothing. Looking forward to finding out. :)

#44 of 107 mattCR

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Posted May 06 2013 - 08:18 AM

For me the book suggests a different form of power and motion than the super heroics used in current movies and the little bit of a teaser suggests.

I could be wrong, making too much of nothing. Looking forward to finding out. :)

 

They note in all of the books, though that the kids took personal defense and karate type classes; it comes into play in several books later (Children of the Mind as Ender/Peter disarms Lanz, Ender's Shadow series repeatedly for Petra, and those on the battle station who trap Achille.. etc.)


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#45 of 107 Morphling

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Posted May 06 2013 - 11:46 PM

absolutely a gree with you.


so what   ;)


#46 of 107 Brandon Conway

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Posted May 07 2013 - 01:13 PM

 

Tricky marketing because they have to sell it as almost a Harry Potter in Space in order to have the emotional payoffs of the ending work without spoiling it. I like what I see, but I won't be surprised if general audiences unfamiliar with the material see the concept as derivative because they don't know what it's truly about thematically.


"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#47 of 107 Adam_S

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Posted May 07 2013 - 04:51 PM

I wish they'd taken a Hunger Games approach of Less is More with the marketing.  As a fan I love seeing so much material from the books come to life, but I think this sort of sell makes the film cheaper or cheesier.

 

Also, does Graff carry the film?


 

#48 of 107 Brandon Conway

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Posted May 07 2013 - 05:20 PM



I wish they'd taken a Hunger Games approach of Less is More with the marketing.  As a fan I love seeing so much material from the books come to life, but I think this sort of sell makes the film cheaper or cheesier.

 

Also, does Graff carry the film?

 

I agree with you on the first part, but perhaps the second trailer will be more along those lines. Like most first trailers they are a lot more eye candy than outright story. They have 6 more months of marketing to deal with.

 

I don't think Graff will carry the film; more likely he will be a key in framing the story background and giving the audience the angle of how zealous the military is in preparing what they believe is an imminent threat. Ideally, a Donald Rumsfeld type.


"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#49 of 107 DaveF

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Posted May 07 2013 - 05:22 PM

They note in all of the books, though that the kids took personal defense and karate type classes; it comes into play in several books later (Children of the Mind as Ender/Peter disarms Lanz, Ender's Shadow series repeatedly for Petra, and those on the battle station who trap Achille.. etc.)

So long as they don't replace Ender's most important individual tactic, which is anything but acrobatic karate-kicking.

There are opportunities for high-speed, 3D maneuvers (the strings always come to mind).

#50 of 107 DaveF

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Posted May 07 2013 - 05:36 PM

Watched the trailer. I'm excited :)

 

But I'm very surprised by the final scene of the trailer.



#51 of 107 Brandon Conway

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Posted May 07 2013 - 08:28 PM

Watched the trailer. I'm excited :)

 

But I'm very surprised by the final scene of the trailer.

 

They're selling the film as "kids enlisted for war", so it makes sense to suggest to non-readers that there is a payoff to the training. They just won't understand what that truly means until they see the movie.


"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#52 of 107 Brandon Conway

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Posted May 08 2013 - 10:54 AM

OK, so having a day to reflect on the trailer and read Asa Butterfield's reddit AMA, here is my take on how they are adapting certain elements of the book.

 

(Long post ahead with major book/story spoilers for EG and the other related novels)

 

Spoiler


"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#53 of 107 mattCR

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Posted May 08 2013 - 12:43 PM

Brandon, I could deal with most of those except for the last one...

 

Spoiler

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#54 of 107 Brandon Conway

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Posted May 08 2013 - 01:00 PM



Brandon, I could deal with most of those except for the last one...

 

Spoiler

 

True, but

 

Spoiler


"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#55 of 107 Lou Sytsma

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Posted May 08 2013 - 08:03 PM

As much as I enjoyed the book, my reading of it took place way before Card made his social views public.  Because of his views I cannot in good conscious support this movie.


Edited by Lou Sytsma, May 08 2013 - 08:06 PM.

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#56 of 107 Adam Lenhardt

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Posted May 09 2013 - 11:32 AM

Everybody has to make their own choices on matters like that. While I disagree strongly with Card's views on homosexuality and many of his political stances, I have no trouble separating the work from the writer. There are a few of Card's novels (the "Empire" series comes to mind) where his skewed worldview infects the material, and I avoid those, but I wouldn't miss this for anything. Ender's Game is a deeply compassionate story, and I don't think going to see the movie counts as an endorsement of the author's views.

Brandon, the main reason I don't think they're going that route is a matter of casting:
Spoiler


Honestly, I think "Speaker of the Dead" might be a better book than "Ender's Game", but it's more or less impossible to make a movie out of: long scenes of talking interspersed with flashes of insanely graphic violence. I could see a great HBO or Showtime miniseries made out of the book, but I don't see how you get a PG-13 blockbuster out of it.

#57 of 107 Lou Sytsma

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Posted May 09 2013 - 12:54 PM

Everybody has to make their own choices on matters like that. 

 

Most definitely.  

 

I have no problems separating work from the writer either but it is a matter of knowing that he is receiving money that he can use to further his views.  Of course, he is going to get the money whether I see the movie or not.  

 

Boycotting the movie is the only way I can be sure that my money: in any way, shape or form, will not end up going to him.

 

I've always felt Adam that Speaker of the Dead is the better book.


Edited by Lou Sytsma, May 09 2013 - 01:03 PM.

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#58 of 107 Adam Lenhardt

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Posted May 09 2013 - 03:27 PM

Fair enough, Lou. I've often wondered if the younger Card who wrote those early books would agree with the Orson Scott Card of today. Because while he wrote one of his best books in recent years (Pathfinder), he seems to be coming from a very different place as a writer now.



#59 of 107 Brandon Conway

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Posted May 09 2013 - 08:03 PM

Honestly, I think "Speaker of the Dead" might be a better book than "Ender's Game", but it's more or less impossible to make a movie out of: long scenes of talking interspersed with flashes of insanely graphic violence. I could see a great HBO or Showtime miniseries made out of the book, but I don't see how you get a PG-13 blockbuster out of it.

 

I like it more as well, but it's never going to get made.

 

What I wrote was just a supposition. They could still go down that road with Breslin in the sequels, but in a different approach.

 

As for Card.... my position is, if I knew every political view of every creative person involved in films and used that to refrain from seeing their work I would probably never see a movie again.


"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#60 of 107 Adam Lenhardt

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Posted July 12 2013 - 04:25 PM

Lionsgate just released a statement about Orson Scott Card's views on same-sex marriage:

As proud longtime supporters of the LGBT community, champions of films ranging from GODS AND MONSTERS to THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER and a Company that is proud to have recognized same-sex unions and domestic partnerships within its employee benefits policies for many years, we obviously do not agree with the personal views of Orson Scott Card and those of the National Organization for Marriage. However, they are completely irrelevant to a discussion of ENDER’S GAME. The simple fact is that neither the underlying book nor the film itself reflect these views in any way, shape or form. On the contrary, the film not only transports viewers to an entertaining and action-filled world, but it does so with positive and inspiring characters who ultimately deliver an ennobling and life-affirming message. Lionsgate will continue its longstanding commitment to the LGBT community by exploring new ways we can support LGBT causes and, as part of this ongoing process, will host a benefit premiere for ENDER’S GAME.

Personally, I don't see the point. It comes across as a big "fuck you" to author of the source material, but I don't think it's going to change the minds of anybody that's offended by Card's views.

Edited by Adam Lenhardt, July 12 2013 - 04:25 PM.





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