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Blu-ray Reviews

The Ten Commandments Blu-Ray (Two-Disc Special Edition) - HIGHLY RECOMMENDED



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#1 of 88 OFFLINE   Neil Middlemiss

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Posted March 26 2011 - 02:52 PM

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The Ten Commandments

2-Disc Set

 

Studio: Paramount Studios
Year: 1956
US Rating: Rated G – For All Audiences
Film Length: 231 Mins
Video: 1080P High Definition 16X9 - 1.85:1

Audio: English 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio, Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround, French and Spanish Mono, Portuguese 2.0 Surround
Subtitles: English, English SDH, French, Spanish, Portuguese


 

Release Date: March 29, 2011

Review Date: March 26 2011

 

“And God said Let there be light, and there was light. And from this light, God created life upon earth. And man was given dominion over all things upon this earth and the power to choose between good and evil. But each sought to do his own will because he knew not the light of God's law. Man took dominion over man, the conquered were made to serve the conqueror, the weak were made to serve the strong, and freedom was gone from this world. So did the Egyptians cause the children of Israel to serve with rigor, and their lives were made bitter with hard bondage. And their cry came up unto God. And God heard them and cast into Egypt, into the lowly hut of Amram and Yochabel, the seed of a man upon whose mind and heart would be written God's law and God's commandments, one man alone against an empire.”

 

Introduction

 

“Let my people go”. Charlton Heston’s casting is perhaps one of the greatest examples of finding the perfect person for the seemingly insurmountable task of bringing the larger-than-life biblical character of Moses to life. Heston’s chisel jaw, booming bass-rich voice, and stoic and grandly statuesque posturing comprised all the requisite theatrics and drama required to stand out  - and not become swallowed by -  the resplendent spectacle of a Cecile B. DeMille production.

 

The Ten Commandments was a monstrous success at the box office, grossing an enormous $65MM from a not small $15MM budget (that’s over $977MM adjusted for inflation). It would garner seven academy award nominations, winning for Visual Effects, and become a mainstay of Passover family entertainment on television after a long theatrical run and theatrical re-runs. It was considered good old-fashioned traditional filmmaking even in 1956, and was the antithesis of noir filmmaking (as Katherine Orrison so succinctly states in her commentary). It remains today a mesmerizing accomplishment of vision and Cecile B. DeMille’s most remarkable accomplishment.   

 

 

The Film: 4.5 out of 5

 

The Ten Commandments is the story of Moses’. The great biblical figure was saved from the cruel edict of Ramses – Egypt’s Pharaoh, which required all first-born Hebrew males to be killed. Rameses I feared the prophecy that a Hebrew child would be born and grow to free the Hebrew slaves and lead them to salvation. So Moses was placed in a reed basket and set afloat upon the Nile. Through the reeds he traveled in the basket until it is discovered by the daughter of the Pharaoh, and though she knows that this child was son to a Hebrew slave, she embraces him as as the son she had prayed for since her husband had passed. She names him Moses and raises him as half-brother to Rameses II. Years later, Moses serves the Pharaoh Sethi along with his jealous brother who vies for his father’s affection being ‘born of his body’ and competes with Moses for the love of the beautiful Nefertiri while he maneuvers to become the future ruler.

 

Soon, Moses discovers his origins, and rejects the comfort and privilege of the Egyptian Pharaoh’s home to be amongst his slave people. The Pharaoh discovers this and banishes Moses, proclaiming that his name never be spoken again (a great dishonor in these times). Moses sets out across the desert where he begins a family, but one day, God appears to Moses as a burning bush and commands him to journey back to Egypt and free the Hebrew slaves. His journey is fraught with peril, turmoil, and miraculous deeds, but Moses never tires. God visits upon the Egyptians the great plagues and Moses leads his people in a great exodus – the journey through the wilderness to Mount Sinai and the revelation of the commandments from God himself..

 

We discuss epics today as films with scale and scope that defy the common movie-going experience, and that is really no different than how audiences have considered epics in decades past. However, before the advent of more accomplished visual and special effects, the scale and splendor of movie epics were achieved through the very real physical presence of mind-bogglingly expansive (and expensive) sets, the deployment of vast swaths of extras, and the very real sense of scale born from the creative eyes and spirits of cinemas most masterful filmmakers. David Lean, Richard Attenborough, and others of this class of filmmakers relished in the splendidness of what was capture by the canvass of film; films like Gandhi, Lawrence of Arabia, All Quiet on the Western Front, and Ben Hur each achieved such scale, but epics are meaningless without a compelling and intimate tale at their core. The Ten Commandments may favor scale and boldness over the intimacy, but at the center of this story is Moses and his very personal journey of discovery and his destiny for something greater than all humankind.   

 

The Ten Commandments is a sweeping epic of, well, epic proportions. The scale of production was grand and the achievements in visual effects illuminated these accomplishments. DeMille was a master of overt dramatic gesture, techniques he crafted and honed from his pre-cinema acting days and his directorial efforts in the silent era of film.  The Ten Commandments unabashedly harkens back to the grandeur and theater of melodrama, but DeMille does succeeds many times in producing a modern (for the time) sensibility for drama over melodrama.

 

This incredible high definition release opens with the wonderful overture written by the late, great Elmer Bernstein, followed by the rare introduction by director Cecil B. DeMille himself, in which he acknowledges the unusual nature of his presence before the picture begins. He explains that many years of Moses’ history are missing from the primary source text but were ‘filled in’ by historians (in accordance with the ancient texts of Philo, Josephus, Eusebius, The Midrash, and of course the Holy Bible).

 

“Our intention was not to create a story, but to be worthy of the divinely inspired story created 3000 years ago; the 5 books of Moses.

 

This 1956 film, lauded as the 10th Greatest Epic of all time as ranked by 1500 members of the ‘creative community’ in AFI’s 2008 rankings of the ten best films in ten distinct genres, is a partial remake of DeMille’s own 1923 silent film. Many cast and crew from that first piece joined DeMille again on this much grander – and successful – retelling. The screenplay is the work of a committee, Joseph Holt Ingraham, Arthur Eustace Southon, who adapted their own books (Pillars of Fire, On Eagle’s Wings and Prince of Egypt) and Dorothy Clarke Wilson, and is awash in historical detail, glorious pageantry, and the structure of tried-and-true narrative flow.

 

“Oh, Moses! Moses! You stubborn, splendid, adorable fool!”

 

Charlton Heston achieves the perfect tone, stature, and pitch as Moses. Moses is a fascinating figure and Heston’s magnitude upon the screen – handsome, heroic, and humble - fill the myth and man of Moses most suitably. Moses’s great doubts of the Almighty God persist in the tale of The Ten Commandment, but his compassion for the slaves give rise to his arrival into the role he was born to and that his journey down the Nile ignited – all of which Heston delivers exceedingly well.

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The cast assembled for The Ten Commandments is superb. Yul Brynner exudes the ‘villainy’ of Rameses II with aplomb; Edward G Robinson is very good as the devious and depraved Dathan (though critics at the time found his portrayal somewhat troublesome); Anne Baxter is lovely and deliberate as Nefertiri, and it is a great joy to watch Sir Cedric Hardwicke as Pharaoh Sethi I. Among the wash of other stars, standouts include Yvonne De Carlo as Sephora, Debra Paget as Lilia, and Vincent Price as Baka the Master Builder.

 

Released in 1956, many years before the passage of the American Civil Rights Act, it is difficult to imagine how the subject of Moses’ contemplative pursuit to find himself, questioning how any man could be a slave, could have been viewed by audiences with anything but compassion for those in American society still relegated and mistreated by those in power. That may seem a tangential thought from this grand telling of the biblical stories told in the great book, but at the core of The Ten Commandments is the question of ‘what makes man’ and why is man so cruel to man; as is stated early in the film “God made man, man made slaves”.  DeMille always considered the star of this film to be God and the extraordinary journey of one man to free the chosen people of God. Though slavery in America had ended a less than hundred years before this film premiered, the lingering effects were pronounced. DeMille’s film, then, is a remarkable feat of popularity, spectacle, and statement for the treatment of all men (and, as is inherent to this story, reverence for the word of God), delivered at a precarious time in American society.

 

DeMille would direct no more feature films following The Ten Commandments, though he had sought to remake his own The Buccaneer. He would die before getting the chance to sit in the director’s chair and set to film – and history – any more of his vision and passion. His final film would become his most successful and most seen of all of his movies – a rare feat.

 

 

 

The Video:  5 out of 5

 

The gloriously rich red and gold dominated title cards are immediately stunning. Mere moments into the film, the care and attention poured into the restoration of the original print calls out its accomplishment, and throughout the entire experience of this epic film – over 2 discs with an aspect ratio of 1.78:1 – it never fails to delight and amaze with the extent of repair and faithfulness on display.

 

Photographed in VistaVision (Director of Photography Loyal Griggs, A.S.C), using Mitchell VistaVision cameras, the production is adorned with bright colors, from skies of warm blue, vistas of golden sands, outfits of deep gold, red and pale blue, and flowers of many colors. They are reproduced here in High Definition with eye-popping precision. It is simply stunning.

 

The outlines created by rear-screen projection and blue screen effects are noticeable at times – but that is a product of this film’s time. I was in constant awe at how magnificent this film looked now 55 years since its original theatrical run. It is an outstanding accomplishment in preservation of the film grain and the clean-up of the print to look anew. The presentation with splendor of the richness of color, framing, light, dark, and tone of this film is cause for celebration.

 

Our good friend and favorite archivist Robert Harris said of this restoration, conducted under the watchful eye of Paramount’s Vice President of Preservation and Restoration Ron Smith,

 

“Sharpness and overall resolution, as captured from the VVLA elements at 4k (6k, if you consider the negative moving sideways, but still 4k perf to perf) is dead-on perfect.  Grain levels appear normal and approximately half that of a normal non-VVLA 5248 production of the era.  I'm seeing no apparent use of DNR or sharpening.”

 

That’s what I see precisely (though Mr. Harris’ attuned eye and technical understanding allows for a far more astute description (in other words, he’s smarter)).

 

Bravo, Paramount. This is perfect!

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The Sound: 4 out of 5

 

The uncompressed English 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio remains crisp throughout, with no issue from the dialogue concentrated in the center channel, the clarity of Elmer Bernstein’s orchestral achievement, rumble of the gallops of chariots, and the whispers and moans of Moses’ name spoken throughout are wonderfully presented. Surround sound – directional effects and envelopment – are minimal, but you will barely notice as the film unfolds.

 

The power, swish, and tumult of the Red Sea as it parts – in addition to still being a spellbinding special effect – sound terrific.

 

Mono audio options are also provided

 

 

The Extras: 3 out of 5

 

This 2-disc edition is relatively light on extras. Those seeking more extensive and intriguing special features would do well to invest in the limited edition giftset, which includes DeMille’s original 1923 feature as well as a 75-minute documentary on the making of the 1956 feature. This edition alas does not contain these or several other special features (most of which were available on the 50th Anniversary DVD release), but what is provided in this 2-disc set is mainly the absolutely fascinating commentary, and of course the simply stunning restored masterpiece itself.

 

Disc One:

1956 Feature Part One (through 2:15:48)

 

Commentary by Katherine Orrison, author of Written in Stone: Making Cecil B. DeMille’s Epic The Ten Commandments: This is perhaps one of my favorite audio commentaries ever recorded. The exquisite details Ms. Orrison provides, both in the production of the film, contained within the frames, and the historical (and recent unearthing’s in Egypt) relevance and influence upon DeMille’s film is of constant fascination. This is an absolute must listen. Those

 

Disc Two

1956 Feature Part 2

 

Commentary by Katherine Orrison: Continuation of Ms. Orrison’s commentary.

 

Newsreel: The Ten Commandments – Premier in New York (2:24): This may be short, but it is fascinating to see footage of the stars arriving for the premier (including Tony Curtis, Janet Leigh, and John Wayne), with crowds gathered to catch glimpses of the stars, with a backdrop of the glitz and bustle of New York City.

 

Trailers (12:40)

§  1956 “Making of: Trailer

§  1966 Trailer

§  1989 Trailer

 

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Final Thoughts

 

The Ten Commandments has rightfully earned its place in the annals of great cinematic accomplishment.  A revered American epic, beloved by millions and the staple of many households at Passover - once it begins it is difficult not to see this long film through to conclusion. Plagues, slave revolts, the word of God, and the destiny of a single man and an entire people are all pieces of Cecile B. DeMille’s magnum opus and all enrapturing elements in the story of Moses’ life.

 

Paramount Pictures has delivered this epic on Blu-Ray for the first time in near perfection. The product of the restoration and transfer in High Definition is extraordinary; a bar set for all future revisits of great cinema onto high definition media from this moment on.

 

Highly Recommended!

 

 

 

 

Overall 4.5 out of 5

Neil Middlemiss

Kernersville, NC


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#2 of 88 OFFLINE   RobertR

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Posted March 26 2011 - 04:20 PM

Looking forward to the arrival of my copy.



#3 of 88 OFFLINE   Adam Gregorich

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Posted March 26 2011 - 05:08 PM

Fantastic review Neil.  Thanks so much.  I haven't pre-ordering yet as I am struggling between which version to buy.  Between this and Ben Hur its a good year for epic films.


I should point out that if you missed the most recent email newsletter we have three copies of the 2 disc Blu-ray that we are giving away.  Click here for details.



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Posted March 26 2011 - 05:51 PM

Thanks for the stunning review!!!! I pre-ordered the big box tonight!!!!



#5 of 88 OFFLINE   Joseph J.D

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Posted March 26 2011 - 08:58 PM

An excellent review....I'm definitely going to buy the big box this week.  This film has always been part of my growing up while enjoying many television viewings over easter weekends over the years....this time out I will enjoy it in glorious HD.....I can't wait.Posted Image


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#6 of 88 OFFLINE   oscar_merkx

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Posted March 27 2011 - 12:53 AM

thanks for the reminder.


I'll get this asap


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#7 of 88 OFFLINE   David Wilkins

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Posted March 27 2011 - 04:45 AM

Great review, Neil! My copy is on the way. I be happy.



#8 of 88 OFFLINE   Craig S

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Posted March 27 2011 - 06:09 AM

Another fine review, Neil, and kudos to Paramount for continuing their great work on catalog titles (if only they'd increase the rate of releases a bit!). Amazon shipped my "big box o' stuff" edition yesterday - definitely looking forward to it.


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#9 of 88 OFFLINE   john a hunter

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Posted March 27 2011 - 12:35 PM

I think the overture before DeMille's intro was by Victor Young who was to do the score before he passed away. The overture proper after the intro is by Bernstein.This was a tribute to Victor Young by DeMile.Can someone confirm?



#10 of 88 OFFLINE   Neil Middlemiss

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Posted March 27 2011 - 01:11 PM

I know in the commentary that it was stated that Bernstein was to supplement Young's score, but he did so well with his first turned in piece that young recommended that Bernstein take over full scoring duties. I'll check to see if I can find if Young did the overture before passing over duties to Bernstein.
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#11 of 88 OFFLINE   ahollis

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Posted March 27 2011 - 02:15 PM




Originally Posted by john a hunter 

I think the overture before DeMille's intro was by Victor Young who was to do the score before he passed away. The overture proper after the intro is by Bernstein.This was a tribute to Victor Young by DeMile.Can someone confirm?


The newer biography on DeMille, The Empire Of Dreams: The Epic Life Of Cecil B. DeMille, states that Victor Young did very little work on the music for 10C and what work he did DeMille did not like it.  He had Bernstein doing some of the orchestrations for Young's work that was handed in, and then had him write a few scene bridges when he knew that Young would not work out, which he liked and then gave the job to Bernstein.  From what the book said, little if none of Young's work was retained due to the music not being "majestic" enough for the film.


Also 10C was relased October 1956 and Victor Young died November 1956 of a stroke, so the tribute would have been before he died.


On a side note, the book is very interesting and the chapters on 10C is extremely well written and informative.  Though some of his films they breeze over, like The Greatest Show On Earth, like C. B. was not interested in the films.


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#12 of 88 OFFLINE   john a hunter

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Posted March 27 2011 - 09:46 PM

I haven't watched the film since it first came out on DVD but from my memories, the" pre intro "music had totally different themes from that used in the rest of the film making me think it was not by Bernstein. Hopefully, my copy will arrive soon althought I haven't had the usual Amazon notification yet that it is even on its way.Perhaps tomorrow!

Thanks Fellas.



#13 of 88 OFFLINE   Joe Caps

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Posted March 28 2011 - 01:47 AM


I really have to jump in here and correct a few things.


One - I remixed the film for stereo for Laserdisc.


Two -  went through some of the history of the film with Elmer Bernstein himself and a friend of mine who had copied notes about the muswic in the De Mille collection at Brigham Young.


three -  Victor Young wrote NO MUSIC for this film at any time.


He found Demille veryu difficult ot work for, and did not feel he could do it again.


Demille hired bernstein to write some of the dance music for prerecords for the film.


When Young backed out, DeMille hired Bernstein.


the pre film Overture uses no actual Ten Commandments thems but only one them, a them for Mr. de Mille himself written by Bernstein.

A year after DeMilles death, there was a special on TV - Cecil B. DeMille - the Wrolds Greatest Showman, which usesw this theme extensively.



#14 of 88 OFFLINE   ahollis

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Posted March 28 2011 - 02:22 AM




Originally Posted by Joe Caps 


I really have to jump in here and correct a few things.


One - I remixed the film for stereo for Laserdisc.


Two -  went through some of the history of the film with Elmer Bernstein himself and a friend of mine who had copied notes about the muswic in the De Mille collection at Brigham Young.


three -  Victor Young wrote NO MUSIC for this film at any time.


He found Demille veryu difficult ot work for, and did not feel he could do it again.


Demille hired bernstein to write some of the dance music for prerecords for the film.


When Young backed out, DeMille hired Bernstein.


the pre film Overture uses no actual Ten Commandments thems but only one them, a them for Mr. de Mille himself written by Bernstein.

A year after DeMilles death, there was a special on TV - Cecil B. DeMille - the Wrolds Greatest Showman, which usesw this theme extensively.


Joe you are absolutely correct on all facts as usual.  I went back last night and re-read those chapters on the 10C music and Young was at first engrossed with his Broadway Musical, "Seventh Heaven" that he kept putting DeMille off.  The play flopped and pushed him into a depression that he never recovered and did not write a note of music.  He just went back to Palm Springs and let his health deteriorate.

I remember the TV special very well to this day and after seeing it only once at a young age.  My memories are mostly of the Betty Hutton and would love for that to find it's way on DVD again.  It would make a great addition to any DeMille collection.


Oh, and you did a great job on the mixing for the Laserdisc.

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#15 of 88 OFFLINE   Bob_S.

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Posted March 28 2011 - 04:38 AM

Neil, thanks for the review. My box set is already pre-ordered. I agree with you about the audio commentary, this IS my favorite. What I like best, besides all the fascinating facts she mentions, is the perfect balance of production, behind-the-scene stories, and Biblical info. Katherine did a fantastic job. I always wanted to email her my thanks but couldn't find an email address for her.



#16 of 88 OFFLINE   john a hunter

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Posted March 28 2011 - 09:20 AM

Good to get the story straight about the Overture. It all makes sense now. Again, thanks Fellas for all your imput.



#17 of 88 OFFLINE   Johnny Angell

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Posted March 28 2011 - 09:46 AM

A search on Amazon only shows the 2 disc edition and the LE Gift set ($55).  I don't see a 3 disc set.  That would suck if the only way to get the making-of is to spend $55.  Maybe I'm missing it.


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#18 of 88 OFFLINE   Scott Calvert

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Posted March 28 2011 - 09:54 AM




Originally Posted by Johnny Angell 

A search on Amazon only shows the 2 disc edition and the LE Gift set ($55).  I don't see a 3 disc set.  That would suck if the only way to get the making-of is to spend $55.  Maybe I'm missing it.



 Why would you think there is a 3 disc set? Did someone mention one in this thread? AFAIK there is only the 2 disc and the box.



#19 of 88 OFFLINE   RobertR

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Posted March 28 2011 - 01:10 PM

Just popped this in, and I think Neil's review is spot on.  It's the kind of title that makes one realize how good movie lovers have it these days.



#20 of 88 OFFLINE   Johnny Angell

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Posted March 28 2011 - 02:19 PM



Originally Posted by Scott Calvert 






 Why would you think there is a 3 disc set? Did someone mention one in this thread? AFAIK there is only the 2 disc and the box.


See the quote from the review below.  When the reviewer mentions a 3 disc set, I just naturally assumed that there was one.




Originally Posted by Neil Middlemiss 

 

This 2-disc edition is relatively light on extras. Those seeking more extensive and intriguing special features would do well to invest in the limited edition 3-disc set, which includes DeMille’s original 1923 feature as well as a 75-minute documentary on the making of the 1956 feature.


Johnny
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