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Blu-ray Reviews

HTF BLU-RAY REVIEW: Bambi: Diamond Edition (Combo Pack)



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#1 of 19 Matt Hough

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Posted February 18 2011 - 01:49 PM

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Bambi: Diamond Edition (Blu-ray Combo Pack)
Directed by  David D. Hand

Studio: Disney
Year: 1942
Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1   1080p   AVC codec  Running Time: 70 minutes
Rating: G
Audio: DTS-HD High Resolution 7.1 English; Dolby Digital 2.0 English, 5.1 French, Spanish
Subtitles: SDH, French, Spanish


Region:  A-B-C
MSRP:  $ 39.99



Release Date: March 1, 2011

Review Date: February 18, 2011



The Film

5/5


Of the Disney Big Five (the first five animated features Disney produced beginning with Snow White), Bambi is its masterpiece. It’s a film which combines with utmost surety and finesse the amalgamation of story, song, and characterization that made it, and continue to make it, one of the most beautiful, elegant, and memorable movies in the history of animation and of movies in general. There isn’t a moment of the film that one would wish different, and from the voice actors to the songs which work so in synch with the story, the movie is simply magical with nary a misstep. Bambi is perfection.


When young fawn Bambi (Donnie Dunagan) is born, all of the forest comes running to witness his first awkward steps. Almost immediately he makes a friend in outspoken bunny Thumper (Peter Behn), and within the next few days, the young prince is introduced to many miracles of nature and makes some more new friends in Faline (Cammie King) and a skunk whom Bambi innocently names Flower (Stan Alexander). As time passes, Bambi enjoys the pleasures of the meadowlands, experiences his first winter with its joys (snow and ice) and discomforts (lack of food), and he becomes increasingly aware that one distinct enemy is man who makes abrupt entrances into his world and must be avoided at all costs.


Based on Felix Salten’s children’s book, the script for Bambi incorporates the book’s story plus adds some new characters. Through it all, the Disney artists have not done “cute” for cute’s sake but rather instilled distinct personalities into these creatures that make them lovable albeit flawed creatures. Dialogue is kept to a minimum while the artists allow the majesty of nature and the glorious Frank Churchill/Edward Plumb score to sweep the viewer through the episodic story that covers basically two years in the lives of these woodland characters. The impressionistic animation is some of the finest ever created, and sequences like Bambi’s struggling with an ice pond or the thunderstorm sequence which brings forth memories of Disney’s Oscar-winning short “The Old Mill” combined with the superb tune “Little April Shower” finds the studio craftsmen at their zenith. Bambi’s clash with a rival for Faline’s affections is done in masterful bold colors and expressionistic shadows symbolizing the dark, fiery emotions at play (most of the film  has been drawn in softly pastoral pastels and watercolors) representing another superlative sequence in a movie crammed with them.


Bambi is not a musical even though it has a song score consisting of four numbers, the best of which comes after Bambi and Faline have mated, the beautiful “I Bring You a Song,” one of the most underrated melodies in the entire Disney canon. But music plays a more important role in helping the film achieve greatness than in some of the earlier features as no character sings in the film (Dumbo had begun this implementation with songs performed on the soundtrack to point up emotional peaks in the story, though there were also musical numbers in the film sung by characters; there is none of that in Bambi). The musical themes for the main characters and the ominous theme for man (who is never seen but whose presence is always felt whenever he’s near) give the film a depth of feeling that live action movies could be proud to possess. Indeed, one of the Oscar nominations for Bambi was for its original score for a dramatic picture.


And the geniuses who cast the charming and delightfully real children who voiced the animals in their youthful incarnations should have been given raises for their sterling efforts. They’re completely real in their line readings making the little bit of dialogue that is present some of the most memorable in all Disney films. Once the animals grow up, we recognize voices like Sterling Holloway, but the film’s early scenes with the animals at their youngest give the movie a lasting impact still as fresh and funny today as it was more than half a century ago.



Video Quality

5/5


The film’s 1.33:1 theatrical aspect ratio is faithfully reproduced in this 1080p transfer using the AVC codec. Boasting no artifacts of any kind (including banding or color fluctuations), the image is pristine. Lines are strong and colors are pastel when they’re supposed to be and bolder at opportune moments. And there is plenty of detail to be glimpsed in the drawings from tree bark to water droplets. The film has been divided into 25 chapters.



Audio Quality

4/5


The disc offers two English soundtrack options: DTS-HD High Resolution 7.1 and the original theatrical track in Dolby Digital 2.0. The original track is louder in volume and much more forward sounding but can’t match the finesse found in the enhanced home theater mix. The bit meter reads this lossy DTS-HD HR track at a constant 2.0 Mbps, and it sounds beautifully rich as the orchestral score and some echo effects get placed in the fronts and rears for impressive impact. True, the thunderstorm sequence doesn’t contain the power that a modern soundtrack would have (the LFE channel isn’t going to be taxed much), and man’s gunshots which ring out occasionally don’t have great pop to them. But the dialogue comes through nicely in the center channel, there is no hiss or other age-related artifacts to spoil the presentation, and the final product is more than acceptable, even if it isn’t in lossless audio.



Special Features

5/5


Diane Disney Miller offers a 1-minute introduction to the movie and the Walt Disney Family Museum in 1080p.


“Inside Walt’s Story Meetings – Enhanced Edition” is the interactive, overlaid presentation that has the movie playing in a succession of windows while we hear a dramatic recreation of story conferences about every aspect of the movie as it plays. At select intervals, the viewer may branch off from this experience with additional vignettes offering extended information about an aspect of the movie, cartoon shorts which offered ideas to the animators, deleted scenes (also offered separately elsewhere on the disc), and opinions about the film from current Disney animation executives. The 69-minute film will run closer to 95 minutes watching it through this program and selecting all of the available side-features. There is also a handy index which the viewer can use to go back and rewatch any of those featurettes or keep track of ones he may have skipped.


There are two deleted scenes which are presented in storyboard and temp track fashion. The “Two Leaves” sequence runs 3 ¼ minutes. “Bambi and the Reed” runs 2 minutes.


The deleted song “Twitterpated” is an audio-only track which runs 2 minutes.


Blu-ray exclusive art galleries offer hundreds of drawings in five categories: character designs, backgrounds, production pictures, storyboards, and visual development.


DisneyView once again is offered for those who don’t wish the black pillarbox bars on either side of the image. These are specially drawn artwork panels by Disney artist Lisa Keen to complement scenes in the movie.


Second Screen is a downloadable app which allows a viewer to synch up watching the Blu-ray to his laptop or iPad.


“Disney’s Big Book of Knowledge” is a children’s interactive encyclopedia/game narrated by the Friend Owl using scenes from the movie to impart information about the seasons, animals, and other elementary facts.


The following are features ported from the previous DVD release of Bambi. They’re all in 480i:


  • The Making of Bambi: A Prince Is Born breaks down the production of the film in a six-part story which can be viewed in individual segments or in one 53 ¼-minute grouping. Some of this information was used in the interactive enhanced program, but much of it is not found elsewhere on the disc.
  • “Tricks of the Trade” is a 7 ¼-minute excerpt from Disney’s television series filmed in 1957 explaining the workings of the multiplane camera and specifically how it was used in Bambi.
  • “Inside the Disney Archives” finds Disney animator Andreas Deja visiting the Disney archives to look at artwork from the film, some of which didn’t make it into the finished work. It’s a very interesting 8 ¾-minute featurette.
  • “The Old Mill” is the 1937 Oscar-winning animated short which marked the first extensive use of the multiplane camera and also revolutionized the portrayals of animals, rain effects, and other motifs which were used more extensively in Bambi. It runs 9 minutes.
  • There are two deleted scenes here presented in storyboard form: “Winter Grass” which runs ½ minute and “Bambi’s First Snow” which runs 2 ½ minutes.
  • The original trailer runs 2 ¼ minutes.
There are 1080p promo trailers for Tangled, Winnie the Pooh, The Lion King, Bambi II, Spooky Buddies, and Tinker Bell and the Mysterious Winter Woods.


Included inside the case is a fold-out pamphlet which shows the organization of the feature and bonus materials on the Blu-ray and DVD discs.


The second disc in the set is the DVD copy of the movie.



In Conclusion

4.5/5 (not an average)


Bambi the film is a perfect motion picture. This Blu-ray release isn’t quite perfect: it doesn’t have the RKO logo at the beginning, and it doesn’t have a lossless DTS audio track. Purists may object to grain removal or color variations from earlier releases. With the wonderful selection of bonus material and the pristine picture and far better than average sound available, I’m happy to add this high definition rendering of one of Disney’s greatest films to my collection. Highly recommended!




Matt Hough

Charlotte, NC



#2 of 19 Mike Frezon

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Posted February 20 2011 - 10:08 AM

Thanks, Matt!


As I said in RAH's thread on this release of Bambi, it sure would be nice to know why Disney decided not to go lossless with this title.  I don't subscribe to the theory that certain older soundtracks would, for some reason, sound worse when presented in lossless audio.  That just doesn't make sense to me.


...and the final product is more than acceptable, even if it isn’t in lossless audio.


I suppose like with so many other Disney releases, I will give a deep sigh and head to the store on March 1st and then get lost in the wonder of this special film.


There's Jessie the yodeling cowgirl. Bullseye, he's Woody's horse. Pete the old prospector. And, Woody, the man himself.Of course, it's time for Woody's RoundUp. He's the very best! He's the rootinest, tootinest cowboy in the wild, wild west!


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#3 of 19 Mark-P

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Posted February 20 2011 - 10:27 AM

I'm waiting for DVDBeaver to post the specs on the disc which will tell us whether the disc is single or dual-layered. If it's single I'm going to bet the reason they didn't go lossless was space, but if it's dual then I guess there's really no excuse, but it's really not that big a deal to me as the distinction between DTS-HD (2.0 Mbps) and DTS-HD-MA is really not going to be distinguishable unless you have supersonic hearing (I don't!)



#4 of 19 Joe Fisher

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Posted February 22 2011 - 01:08 PM



Originally Posted by Mark-P 

I'm waiting for DVDBeaver to post the specs on the disc which will tell us whether the disc is single or dual-layered. If it's single I'm going to bet the reason they didn't go lossless was space, but if it's dual then I guess there's really no excuse, but it's really not that big a deal to me as the distinction between DTS-HD (2.0 Mbps) and DTS-HD-MA is really not going to be distinguishable unless you have supersonic hearing (I don't!)



http://www.dvdbeaver...are9/bambi_.htm


Disc size: 43,451,907,151 bytes



#5 of 19 Mark-P

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Posted February 22 2011 - 01:15 PM



Disc size: 43,451,907,151 bytes

Yeah, that translates to about 40GB. You'd think with 10GB left of free space, there would be room for lossless, but I don't know.



#6 of 19 Matt Hough

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Posted February 22 2011 - 02:20 PM

Last week, I took part in a Virtual Press Roundtable with Donnie Dunagan who was the original voice of the young Bambi. Below is a transcript of the Q&A session I was a part of:


 

Q - How old were you when you got the role of Bambi? A - Donnie Dunagan: I want to share good specifics with everyone, on my wonderful life story. But on your question I must guess some. My agent got some feeler contact months before Disney reached my mother. I was just six years old in the fall of 1940 when production started on the film and my trips to the Disney studio to work on it extended into early 1941.


Q - What was the hardest part about playing Bambi? A - Donnie Dunagan: If I had spoken of this while working on the film, I might have been fired! The hardest part was being serious. I loved the studio. The people were very different. I had a great time. Animators and all of the different people at Disney offered to show me how certain things worked, and the ice cream in the dining room was great.


Q - Do you still feel connected to the character of Bambi? A - Donnie Dunagan: Yes, in many ways. Bambi had to fend largely for himself, rather young, and so did I. He had to learn some hard realities at a young age and stand-up to threats and real danger. So did I. He made it, despite much and tried to stand as an example. I hope I have too.


Q - What is your favorite encounter with a fan who knew you as the voice of Bambi, either then or now? A - Donnie Dunagan: It was nearly 6 years ago, in central west Texas. I was asked to help at a local fund-raising dinner with lots of people attending. I was the third speaker. The first two, gentle, gracious caring civic folks, had asked the large crowd to please pay attention to this local funding problem and please help. They were gentle and passive. That was not moving the group to do much. Then it was my turn. Right after hello I said..."Now, no nonsense with this. Get you check book out, guys and ladies. Now waive them in the air...Hold them up. Good. Now pens out. Start writing....I am watching." It got lots of laughs and guess what? Lots of checks. At one of the tables was a wonderful WWII widow and the only person in Texas that knew I was part of Disney's Bambi. She turned to a friend at that table and said, too loud, "Would you believe that that fighter up there was Bambi in 1940-something?" Right behind her was the manager of the local TV station. Well, the next morning, with no notice, up pulls a TV van and a reporter. Then the Disney Studio heard of it from someone else and called me immediately.


Q - Did you have to record many takes before finding the right tone? A - Donnie Dunagan: I do not think so. I remember that I was encouraged to just be myself, a real, natural kid. I suspect Thumper had the same instructions given to him, be honest, natural kids. If you listen to Thumper, he sounds just like some kid playing second base on a dirt field in New Jersey, very real...wonderful. Walt Disney was way ahead of his time in respecting the use of age appropriate voices for his characters.


Q - After all these years, do people still ask you to do recitations from Bambi? A - Donnie Dunagan: Yes. Boy, did that get me by surprise! Kids always ask. At first I had to modify my long developed adult voice and get all the Marine tones out of it, in order to say "bird," "flower" and so on. With some practice I have been able to do it!


Q - What was a recording session like, for you? Please share with us the details you can remember, what kind of facility, how did it seem to you as a young child? A - Donnie Dunagan: It was a relaxed atmosphere in the sound booth with one or two Disney crew people there, plus my Mother. It was easy does it. I thought it would be harder, since there wasn't any on-camera work. I recall there was very little pre-recording rehearsal time. The microphones were rather basic back then, one was in a small bird-cage on a stand. It was easier than one might suspect.


Q - Did you do any other dubbing / voice over work after Bambi? A - Donnie Dunagan: No. Like a lot of companies affected by WWII, Disney changed immediately after Bambi came out and was used by our War Dept. to help our country. My family had some problems and I never was approached to work in films again, and I did not search that out either.


Q - What kind of interaction with Walt Disney did you have during the voice recording and live action staging. Also, did you keep in touch with Mr. Disney during the next decades after making the movie? A - Donnie Dunagan: There was no follow-up with Mr. Disney. The start of WWII for America changed the country and life-styles more radically than younger generations can think possible.


Q - What would you say you’ve gained from your childhood career in film? A - Donnie Dunagan: How to quickly identify reality from fantasy, and how to enjoy both but realize the difference.


Q - How do you feel now in 2011 about being the original voice of Bambi? A - Donnie Dunagan: Wonderful. Not many would understand this, if they had a clue of even half of my teen and long adult life. The reality is, at age 77, it is pure joy that both children and 80 year-olds can enjoy the film together. I could be working in the White House and children could care less. But let someone say, "that dude over there was the face, or voice of Bambi," and I am an immediate adopted grandfather to them. That is just an unmatchable joy, and a real responsibility.


Q - Do you have a favorite scene from Bambi? A - Donnie Dunagan: The young deer kiss, while Bambi was feeling sorry for himself, sitting in a thicket. I had to pretend to have taken a double-dose of Castor oil, grim stuff for a kid, in order to make such an unhappy face with angry eyes. Boys at that age do not want to be kissed by a cute girl. I am glad that I grew-out of that phase!


Q - What are your current and future endeavors? A - Donnie Dunagan: I am about as retired as a professor, who has a night job as a police officer. I tutor truly caring students, high school and college undergrads in science and physics, mostly pro bono. The hardest working kids anywhere. Sometimes we deliver food from our food bank to elementary schools. I’m also active in Lions Club, which is a great service to area communities. And I also work for peanuts for my wife. Captain Honnnny-Dooo. Ha!


Q - Did you ever go hunting yourself? A - Donnie Dunagan: Yes, but with a camera only.


Q - Do you recall any aspects of Bambi that your mother recognized as being similar to you? A - Donnie Dunagan: Nothing I can recall now. But I will share with you something… the drive between our home in West Los Angeles and Disney Studios was a drag! Boring! We learned to play spelling bee in the car, each one challenging the other. I had been reading newspapers since age 5 and could spell reasonably. One time I challenged my Mom that I could spell Disney "better" than she could. I remember her response," How can you spell anything better than the correct spelling?" "Mom, bet I can....bet you a quarter." 'OK' she said, thinking me a bit silly. She then spelled it D.I.S.N.E.Y., and then she said, "OK, smarty, how can you spell that better for a quarter?" My spelling of Disney was 'F. U. N.' She smiled, laughed and gave me a quarter.


Q - Why did you never talk about being the voice of Bambi even when you were still a child? Haven't you been excited to show off with your Hollywood-adventures in front of your friends? A - Donnie Dunagan: During WWII, and into early teens, my thoughts were focused on just getting by. I totally supported myself from age 13 and ½ on. While I did many school plays, and later was awarded many times for being a leading instructor at the Marine officer's colleges, I had such a dislike for 'show-offs,' and those that boasted about themselves, that I became a very poor self-promoter. Now, in my 70s, I am having a ball with young and old people loving Mr. Disney's Bambi with them and it is an honor to be a part of it.


Q - Have you had an interest in going back into voice acting at all? A - Donnie Dunagan: Yes. I would do it in a flash. Moreover, I would love to get a shot at a real challenging on-camera character role. Send me that leading role and I will do 20 push-ups in the snow for you!


Q - Did anyone nickname you Bambi throughout your life? A - Donnie Dunagan: Ha! Only in the last few years, all in good fun and mostly at my expense. And I have come to love that teasing.


Q - Were you excited about being in a Disney film? Had you seen any of their films before entering the studio? A - Donnie Dunagan: I was so excited to learn we were going to the Disney studio that I constantly pestered my poor Mom. I had not yet seen a Disney film when I was chosen to do Bambi. We seldom went to the movies. Time was always pressed with practicing dancing, singing, language, and on and on. But I knew of the Disney studio and was thrilled to do it.


Q - What would Bambi's fans find in this new Diamond edition Blu-ray? A - Donnie Dunagan: Fans should put their senses on "Happy Alert." Bambi on Blu-ray will knock your socks off. The Blu-ray technology is a visual atmosphere all its own, thanks to Mr. Disney's insistence that even the background of the forest and the rain drops be painted in real oil paints. Stand-by for joy.


Q - Are you involved in any new projects right now? A - Donnie Dunagan: I have many uses of my time, all for good humanist purposes. I am usually up at 4:30am, and busy in helping others including veterans, tutoring children in math and sciences, and my own home life.


Q - What started your career in the film industry? A - Donnie Dunagan: In Memphis, TN, late 1938. My parents and thousands of other in Tennessee were poor as dirt. My Mother entered me into a talent show contest. The theater was loaded with people. There was no TV yet and talent contests and even spelling bees drew large gatherings. I had learned to do some fun tap dances and songs. At not quite age 4, I won the contest. A real talent-scout was in the Memphis theater. He visited with my parents and a couple of days later we were put on a train to Hollywood. Within a month I was acting in the film Mother Carey's Chickens for a wonderful director named Mr. Rowland Lee, who then took me into two other movies with co-star billing within half a year.


Q - One of your first roles was ‘Peter von Frankenstein’ in the film Son of Frankenstein – what do you remember about the experience on that set? A - Donnie Dunagan: Son of Frankenstein was a child's dream of fun. ‘Frankenstein’ off-camera, was a good humored guy, liked by all. Mr. Rowland Lee, the director, should get an award for courage, casting me with all those polished voices. I was still just a few months out of the deep south. It was great fun.


Q - How did you go about obtaining the role of Young Bambi? Did you have an agent as a child actor? A - Donnie Dunagan: Yes. I had an agent when I met Walt Disney. But in the end, I know my Mother got a call from the Studio and was excited, as was I. Interestingly, I fired my first agent. He then said that I was too young to fire him. He had been rude to my Mother thinking she was not a college graduate, and she was. So at age 5 and ½  I fired him.


Q - At what age did you enjoy Bambi best? A - Donnie Dunagan: Boy, what a wise question. In the mid-1970s when it was first re-released, I was a mature man then, age 40, and with a ton of uncommon life experiences. I related to Bambi much better, taking some of the real life cycles that story shares and feeling them with my own life. Mr. Disney was way ahead of his time in visual story telling. I know Ph.D., heavy-hitters that have told me of their experiences realizing more life and humanities from each viewing of Bambi.


Q - Were you afraid at any time whilst first watching Bambi as a child? A - Donnie Dunagan: Yes, while I had some sense of the story-line, nothing could prepare my Mother and I for the scope and power of Bambi the first few times we saw it. I had very wet eyes when Bambi’s mother was killed by hunters off-camera. Someone at the studio told us that the original drawings had her killed on-camera and that Mr. Disney had the very good taste to direct that to be changed.


Q - Bambi never dies, it is ageless, what do you think is the secret of this magical feeling? Is it the rhythm of the movie? Is it the voices? Is it the color and the photography? A - Donnie Dunagan: Your question is darn bright and like some of the best questions in life, self-answering. Bambi is truly unmatched in visual animation. It is like the lead song...."Love is a story that will never end"... Bambi has so much story, so many real-life emotions, and beautiful animation. It is a love song to all of us, and it will never end.


Q - Can you tell me about the direction you get for the recording of Bambi desperately calling for his dead mother? A - Donnie Dunagan: I remember this well. When I was told to say, with some stress, "Mother....Mother," I must have not had the tone of fear that the story needed. A coach, I think it was a nice lady at the studio, asked me how I would cry out loud if my own real Mother was lost and in great danger. That made it easy.....thus, the fear-tone of ""Mother...Mother..."


Q - Donnie, can you share with us any final thoughts on Bambi? A - Donnie Dunagan: This animated film has been with us for almost 70 years now. It has additional dimensions that one may not see or feel in the first viewing. Bambi touches us, in many good humanist ways. Disney and Bambi are truly spelled F.U.N. I was a super lucky-duck kid to have been any part of it. And to this day, I feel indebted to Mr. Disney.

-



#7 of 19 Adam Gregorich

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Posted February 22 2011 - 02:35 PM

Here are some clips:

Film Clip- Thumpers Greenery Lesson:



Film Clip- Kind of Wobbly:



Film Clip- Bambi Meets Flower:





#8 of 19 Matt Hough

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Posted February 25 2011 - 10:07 AM

You can get a $10 off coupon for the combo release of Bambi by going here.



#9 of 19 Jason_V

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Posted February 28 2011 - 05:29 AM

I've never been a fan of Bambi and quite honestly don't understand what everyone sees in it.  It's this "moment in time" film without a real driving narrative behind it.  We're simply watching these characters go about a "normal" period in their lives.  The same kind of goes for Snow White with me.  I haven't given Bambi the time of day since the last DVD release, so I *am* looking forward to trying it out again with the BD release.



#10 of 19 Brian Borst

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Posted March 01 2011 - 07:46 AM



Originally Posted by Jason_V 

I've never been a fan of Bambi and quite honestly don't understand what everyone sees in it.  It's this "moment in time" film without a real driving narrative behind it.  We're simply watching these characters go about a "normal" period in their lives.  The same kind of goes for Snow White with me.  I haven't given Bambi the time of day since the last DVD release, so I *am* looking forward to trying it out again with the BD release.


That's actually why I think it's a great movie. It's really experimental in its storytelling (something that seems to be missing from Hollywood's animated features these days), especially for that time, and the gorgeous animation makes it a thing of beauty to look at. Some might say it's a simple movie, but those are often the most difficult to make correctly.



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#11 of 19 Radioman970

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Posted May 17 2012 - 09:42 AM

I was about to give the DVD to my mother but I noticed this: "Disneypedia: Bambi's Forest Friends" this item is listed on the DVD but not the blu ray extras listing. So..does this mean mom does not get the DVD? In other words, the bluray doesn't have that extra?
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#12 of 19 Ethan Riley

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Posted May 17 2012 - 01:23 PM

No, that extra is not on the blu-ray. It was a carry-over from the older dvd release. But it's only a 4 minute clip of baby animals with fun facts or whatever. Don't be such a stingy hoarder--give that dvd to your mom!!! (Really, isn't "Bambi" just the perfect Mother's Day gift??)
 

 


#13 of 19 Johnny Angell

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Posted May 17 2012 - 03:27 PM

I've never been a fan of Bambi and quite honestly don't understand what everyone sees in it.  It's this "moment in time" film without a real driving narrative behind it.  We're simply watching these characters go about a "normal" period in their lives.  The same kind of goes for Snow White with me.  I haven't given Bambi the time of day since the last DVD release, so I *am* looking forward to trying it out again with the BD release.

Really? There's no narrative? We see his childhood, his mother is murdered, he escapes from a forest fire. His father intervenes. I've always thought this film had plot that moved it forward. Is this a normal period in their lives? I guess you could argue that, but the nature of their lives makes it extraordinary. I understand not everyone likes the film, but not because there's no story there.
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#14 of 19 Jason_V

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Posted May 18 2012 - 02:05 AM

Going back to the first time I saw Bambi in theater, it's never been a Disney movie I hanker to see.  My mother will tell you I cried through the entire thing when she took me to see it.

Here's my problem, as best as I can remember it: the story before the fire doesn't build to anything.  Look at Little Mermaid, for instance.  From the beginning, we know Ariel wants to be human and is fascinated with human culture.  Therefore, everything that happens is in service of that one goal.

Take non-Disney: Jaws.  We know from the beginning there is a shark terrorizing humans.  Everything, from Brody's paranoia to getting on the boat with Quint, is in service of that.


What happens during Bambi?  Bambi plays with his friends and gets older.  It feels like, to me, there came a point in the story where the everyone realized there was no BIG event and the fire was thrown in.



#15 of 19 Radioman970

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Posted May 18 2012 - 03:58 AM

No, that extra is not on the blu-ray. It was a carry-over from the older dvd release. But it's only a 4 minute clip of baby animals with fun facts or whatever. Don't be such a stingy hoarder--give that dvd to your mom!!! (Really, isn't "Bambi" just the perfect Mother's Day gift??)

She'd love it. But she already knows I'm a cheap bastard! lol Truth be told: I have a stack of things I'm taking her, including the DVDs that came with Snow white, Beauty & the Beast, and Fiddler on the Roof. She'll act like it's the great things ever because I'm giving them to her. Little old ladies are so easy to pull one over on! lol [SPOILER=Warning: Spoiler!](God, don't let mom see this)[/SPOILER]
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#16 of 19 Mike Frezon

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Posted May 18 2012 - 04:14 AM

I may be a bit of an old man (53).  But I think it's a nice thing for you to do, James!  Posted Image


You are giving her something she'll enjoy that she didn't already have.


My dad is a voracious reader and I scour garage sales and library book sales just to keep him busy.  He knows where the books are from and couldn't care that they are "used/cheap."  He just enjoys 'em and appreciates the effort. 


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#17 of 19 Johnny Angell

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Posted May 20 2012 - 05:01 AM

Going back to the first time I saw Bambi in theater, it's never been a Disney movie I hanker to see.  My mother will tell you I cried through the entire thing when she took me to see it.  Here's my problem, as best as I can remember it: the story before the fire doesn't build to anything.  Look at Little Mermaid, for instance.  From the beginning, we know Ariel wants to be human and is fascinated with human culture.  Therefore, everything that happens is in service of that one goal. 

When my wife and I first saw The Fox and the Hound" there was a scene so emotionally wrenching to us, we decided to never watch the movie again. It's not a comment about the quality of the movie, but simply a choice. As for the movie having no point early one, I can think of another that is similar. To Kill a Mockingbird is, for the first 30 minutes (might not be that long) concerned almost only with the life of two kids. Sure, if you've scene it before you know that's not all of it, but a first time watcher wouldn't. However, I don't find this aimless, but very engaging on an emotional level. The kids are so real, its so easy to identify with them. So it is with Bambi, I recognize myself the the juvenile forest creatures. Not every moment of a movie must move the plot along. Some of it must be to introduce the audience to (and cause the audience to care about) the characters.
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#18 of 19 Jason_V

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Posted May 20 2012 - 12:06 PM

I don't begrudge anyone their enjoyment of Bambi.  It resides on my shelf right now.  However, it is not the Disney classic for me it is to most people.


#19 of 19 Radioman970

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Posted May 21 2012 - 07:58 AM

I may be a bit of an old man (53).  But I think it's a nice thing for you to do, James!  :tu: You are giving her something she'll enjoy that she didn't already have. My dad is a voracious reader and I scour garage sales and library book sales just to keep him busy.  He knows where the books are from and couldn't care that they are "used/cheap."  He just enjoys 'em and appreciates the effort. 

Mom is 65. She was very happy when I gave her those. She'll probably watch them with my 10 year nieces and/or my 5 year old great nephew (he just moved near to my folks, and I got to see him for the first time this weekend). Anyway, Mom is enjoying getting my DVDs I've upgraded to Blurays for myself. I made her pay a few dollars for a stack once. I'm not happy with that! :blush: Mom is a hell of a haggler. We went to a big flea market this weekend and she talked them down from $45 to $20 on season 1 - 6 (6 on blu ray) of Weeds for me. She even paid $7 of it for me since I was short. She's also a book collector, has shelves that are double stacked. Dad got her a Kindle for xmas and she's loving the hell out of that thing.
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