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$600 tops. What reciever should I Buy?


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#1 of 12 OFFLINE   noob5684

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Posted January 18 2011 - 06:58 AM


I currently own the HTib Sony dav-hdx500. But now I want to expand my horizons and want to buy a new a/v receiver. Budget friendly But that will also kick the butt out my current Receiver. I have $600 tops. I know it is not much but can I get something better then this HTib that I currently own.


Any suggestions? Thank you.



#2 of 12 OFFLINE   Jason Charlton

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Posted January 18 2011 - 09:38 AM

Sadly, the speakers that come with that Sony HTiB system have impedances of 3 ohms (online manual - page 101-102), so they really shouldn't be connected to a "regular" receiver.  Most receivers are rated for 8 or 6 ohm speakers.  This is one of the main drawbacks to many HTiB systems - the components work well together, but once you start upgrading, the whole system has to go.


At a $600 budget, you probably won't be able to get a separate receiver and 5.1 speaker system, but there are some much better HTiB systems from Onkyo that fall into that budget range.  These systems are better because they have at their heart a "real" A/V Receiver that CAN work with other speakers and provides a clear upgrade path.


In particular, the Onkyo 5300 system is a popular option, as is the Onkyo 6300.  The main difference between the two is that the 6300 will upconvert analog video sources (such as a Wii) to output via HDMI.  This is a nice convenience feature, as in most cases, we recommend connecting all your devices to the Receiver (audio and video) then running a single HDMI cable from receiver to TV (using the TV a a monitor only).  This makes the receiver the "hub" of your system, and switches audio and video with a single button press.


The current price on the 6300 at Amazon is a steal.


What other devices/sources do you plan on connecting to the system?  If we have a good idea of your needs, there may be other alternatives available to you as well.


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#3 of 12 OFFLINE   noob5684

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Posted January 18 2011 - 10:41 AM

I just bought new speakers. They're currently hooked up to the Sony Htib, But that Is why I am looking for a new receiver and give the HTib to my daughter for her room it would be great for Hannah Montana.


The components that would be hooked up to the new receiver would be a PC/ Xbox360/ Ps3/ Cable Box/ but things do get bought so I would need room for to play.


My setup consist of these speakers as of right now

Polk audio r300 for front, But I would like to use them for the rear surround and buy some new fronts.

Polk cs10 for center

Polk psw10 for sub which in time will be replaced.

Polk monitor30 series II which are the surround now. But would like to put them in the surround position on a 7.1 or 7.2 system.


Thank you for your time.. I am a newbie but I want to learn.



#4 of 12 OFFLINE   Jason Charlton

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Posted January 18 2011 - 01:29 PM

Ah, that does change things quite a bit.


$600 will get you a very nice receiver.  I happen to be a big believer in avoiding "overbuying" on the receiver end.  All things considered, the biggest impact on how your system sounds is in the speakers (that's where the big bucks should go).  The main criteria for the receiver is connectivity options and any specific features that you need that are exclusively in the realm of the receiver (iPod dock, Satellite Radio, etc.).  Over time, the receiver is also one of the more likely pieces of equipment to become "outdated" (new audio formats, or the ever evolving HDMI standard...) so I see little point in spending much more than $5-600.


Wattage numbers on a receiver are mostly worthless.  Not only are the numbers posted highly suspect and often not at all indicative of real-world usage, it takes double the wattage to produce roughly 3dB of increased volume.  So the difference between an 80 Wpc receiver and a 100 Wpc receiver is miniscule.


Keeping with the Onkyo brand (I've used them for over a decade and have had great experiences), the Onkyo TX-SR608 is at the sweet spot of features and price (once again, Amazon has a great deal on it - plus they are an authorized Onkyo dealer).  Not much reason to step up from there unless network connectivity is a requirement.  That's something I'm not terribly knowledgeable about.


Other frequently mentioned models/brands around here include the Pioneer VSX-1020K, the Denon AVR-1911, and the Yamaha RX-V567.  At a quick glance, all seem pretty comparable in features.


When it comes to receivers, Sony is not one of the most respected manufacturers.  Their higher-end ES series are OK, but Onkyo, Denon, Yamaha, and Pioneer are all solid brands.  Many consider Denons to be the least user friendly of the bunch, and it can be harder to find good deals on them, too.  Onkyos have a reputation for running a bit hot (that hasn't been my experience) so if the gear is going to be housed in a cabinet or in a tight space, it may be a factor.


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#5 of 12 OFFLINE   winniw

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Posted January 18 2011 - 04:15 PM

I think that the most that you could get for your money would be the Denon AVR 1900, Onkyo TX-NR708, Pioneer VSX-1120 and Yamaha RX-V797.


Based on a CNET review and many posts that I have read, the best sound would be had with the Denon.  It also has HD Radio and I don't think that the others do.  However, CNET mentioned that the Denon has a little less connectivity than comparable units, so watch out for that, if that is an issue.


http://reviews.cnet....;contentBody;1r 



#6 of 12 OFFLINE   Jason Charlton

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Posted January 19 2011 - 01:52 AM

Whether it makes sense for Colin to step up a model from the 608 to the 708, or from the 1020 to the 1120 will depend on whether he has need for the added features.  From his description of sources, it doesn't seem like he has any need for internet radio streaming, S-Video connections, analog multichannel inputs, or a phono input.  These are pretty much the bulk of the differences between the models.


Like I mentioned in my post, it's good to be futureproof, but many of these added features are more likely used to support "legacy" products like VHS/Laserdisc (S-video, phono inputs), niche products like SACD (analog m/c inputs), or internet streaming services.  Why pay for the features if you're not going to use them?


These days, having 5-6 HDMI inputs of the latest generation (1.4) should serve anyone well for a number of years.


Colin mentioned a budget of $600 max.  It doesn't necessarily mean he HAS to spend every penny of it, right?  If Colin can save a few bucks here, it can be put into the fund for a new subwoofer (which I think would make the biggest impact in improving the sound of his system).


Good luck, Colin.  Lots to think about!


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#7 of 12 OFFLINE   noob5684

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Posted January 19 2011 - 04:27 AM

Thank you Everyone for your responses. I quoted this post because you Jason had said "Sony is not the most respected manufacturer" that is my opinion too. It is also funny you said the Onkyo tx-sr608 and the Denon avr-1911 because those are the two receivers that I am stuck in between of. I don't need Satellite radio which the PC comes into play. I don't need an Ipod dock which the PC also comes into play too.  Thank you I do have alot to think about, but it is hard to think about. When I am enjoying my new project, just ordered me a his and hers Sennheiser rs180 wireless headphones set. which should be here today.. :-) I wish I had neighbors like you guys.. Movie Night!!

Originally Posted by Jason Charlton 

Ah, that does change things quite a bit.


$600 will get you a very nice receiver.  I happen to be a big believer in avoiding "overbuying" on the receiver end.  All things considered, the biggest impact on how your system sounds is in the speakers (that's where the big bucks should go).  The main criteria for the receiver is connectivity options and any specific features that you need that are exclusively in the realm of the receiver (iPod dock, Satellite Radio, etc.).  Over time, the receiver is also one of the more likely pieces of equipment to become "outdated" (new audio formats, or the ever evolving HDMI standard...) so I see little point in spending much more than $5-600.


Wattage numbers on a receiver are mostly worthless.  Not only are the numbers posted highly suspect and often not at all indicative of real-world usage, it takes double the wattage to produce roughly 3dB of increased volume.  So the difference between an 80 Wpc receiver and a 100 Wpc receiver is miniscule.


Keeping with the Onkyo brand (I've used them for over a decade and have had great experiences), the Onkyo TX-SR608 is at the sweet spot of features and price (once again, Amazon has a great deal on it - plus they are an authorized Onkyo dealer).  Not much reason to step up from there unless network connectivity is a requirement.  That's something I'm not terribly knowledgeable about.


Other frequently mentioned models/brands around here include the Pioneer VSX-1020K, the Denon AVR-1911, and the Yamaha RX-V567.  At a quick glance, all seem pretty comparable in features.


When it comes to receivers, Sony is not one of the most respected manufacturers.  Their higher-end ES series are OK, but Onkyo, Denon, Yamaha, and Pioneer are all solid brands.  Many consider Denons to be the least user friendly of the bunch, and it can be harder to find good deals on them, too.  Onkyos have a reputation for running a bit hot (that hasn't been my experience) so if the gear is going to be housed in a cabinet or in a tight space, it may be a factor.





#8 of 12 OFFLINE   DaveF

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Posted January 24 2011 - 05:10 AM

When I was shopping a for a new receiver in 2009 -- I had a $600 budget too -- I concluded:

* All major manufacturers made good hardware (Onkyo, Denon, Pioneer, etc.)

* It's impractical to do any sort of real demo listening for a $600 receiver

* Shop based on price and features (and then reviews and "warm fuzzies" -- the things that make you happy with a purchase).


I went with the Onkyo 707 because it would be my third Onkyo and I was comfortable with the brand, and it had better features than the equivalent Denon (it had more HDMI inputs and Audyssey MultEQ).


I'm sure that no matter what you buy, it will be a real step up in performance and features :)



#9 of 12 OFFLINE   Philip Hamm

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Posted January 25 2011 - 03:49 AM

If you don't need the "latest and greatest" you can practically steal older models.  Great deals to be had at www.accessories4less.com .  They sell Marantz and Onkyo gear, including heavily discounted older models and refurbished pieces.


http://www.accessori...Receiver/1.html


How about $1600 worth of receiver for $600.


http://www.accessori...Receiver/1.html


Lots of other choices there.


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#10 of 12 OFFLINE   mikeabt

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Posted January 26 2011 - 03:16 PM

I would like to propose the Pioneer Elite VSX-30.  It is the entry level (lowest priced) Elite model.  It is very similar to the VSX-1120-K (standard Pioneer label), but has 24 months warranty vs a typical receiver at 12 months. Don't let the 80W / channel (real watts ;>) x 7.1 - throw you by comparing to other makes and models. You need to hear it to respect it.  The sound is above average (in clarity and punch) for the price range.  The features are fairly basic without a lot of gimmickry......just down-to-earth good sound when utilizing any/all source components. Elite models are very good at delivering great sound and video.  Definitely worth checking out.



#11 of 12 OFFLINE   gene c

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Posted January 26 2011 - 04:15 PM

Actually, the VSX-30 is closer to the 920. The VSX-31=1020 and the VSX-32=1120. For $600 I'd get an 1120 and an extended warranty but those factory refurbs at ac4l are hard to beat.


"Everyday room": Panasonic 58" Plasma, Dish HD DVR, Pioneer Elite vsx-23, BDP-23 BR, dv58avi universal dvd player, Paradigm Studio 20 V1, CC-450, Dayton HSU-10 subwoofer.

"Movie/Music room": Toshiba 65" DLP, Dish HD receiver, Marantz 7005, CC-4003, BD-7006, Polk LSI25's-LSi7's-LSiC, 2 original Dayton 10" "Mighty-Mites" subwoofers. (subject to change without notice).
 
Also have  MB Quart Vera VS05 +.....too much to list. Help me.
 
 

 


#12 of 12 OFFLINE   DaveF

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Posted January 27 2011 - 12:12 AM

If I was shopping today, that $699 Onkyo 1007 that Phillip linked to would be very tempting.