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Sprint Galaxy Tab Discussion


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#1 of 110 ONLINE   Hanson

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Posted December 01 2010 - 06:28 AM


I ended up getting the Sprint Galaxy Tab after all.  At $399 and $29/mo for 2GB of data, it's a bit on the steep side, but I have some work connections that mitigated the price enough to make me pull the trigger.  So the big negative here is that it's overpriced for most people -- it's $1020 over the course of 2 years or $42.50 per month to own a supplement to your existing cell phone and laptop/desktop, and that's assuming you stay within the 2GB limit (which is quite feasible if you stay on wifi most of the time, or $60/mo for 5GB).  Here are my first impressions:   The long and short of it is that the Tab as an oversized Android phone, specifically one of the newer models with 4+" screens.  But the increase in size and, more importantly resolution (1024X600 vs 800X480), has increased some of the functionality of the Tab.  For instance, I can remote desktop with a 800 X 600 desktop and scale it to fit the screen in portrait mode, which gives me plenty of room for the keyboard, mouse pointer, and function keys.  So as a remote client, the Tab is fantastic -- having an unobstructed, full view of the remote desktop is a huge leap in productivity over what I was used to on the Evo, and that was actually the best handheld RDP experience at the time.   The increased size and resolution also works wonders for the keyboard, which is about the same size in portrait mode as it is on the Evo in landscape.  I can type very quickly on the Tab using the Vlingo keyboard.  The reason I use the Vlingo keyboard is that I don't really like Swype all that much, and both Swype and the Samsung keyboard are slow to react to finger taps.  The Vlingo keyboard is actually the stock Android 2.1 keyboard, and it's very fast and responsive and this is the best two thumb typing experience I've encountered.  Typing with both hands in landscape mode, while feasible, limits the amount of viewable screen and without a way to prop it up on an angle is a rather awkward experience.   I had wondered why in the world the GTab and the iPad had such large, prominent bezels rather than having screen from edge to edge.  After a few minutes, I realized that you need a place for your thumb to grip the device, and it became clear why you needed the bezel. The size of the GTab is too big to hold it from edge to edge comfortably, although you can do it if you want to.  It's easier to hold it like a fan.  I very much like the ability to hold the GTab in one hand and scroll with the other.  Not having to set down the device to use it makes it very portable -- for tying, one handed pecks for short stuff and a quick adjustment of the left hand to type with two thumbs for longer compositions. And speaking of portability, the GTab fits into my coat pocket.  I'll have to figure out what to do when the weather gets warmer.  But for me, the true portability of the GTab is what distinguishes it from the iPad. Outside of OS, your preference really boils down to a form factor issue.  The iPad is a laptop replacement but isn't any smaller and slightly more wieldy.  The GTab is like a PADD straight from the Enterprise-D deck.  That form factor is good enough for the 24th century, and it works very well in the 21st century as well.   Videos on the GTab are beautiful.  The native player can handle avi and mkv file extensions and the common codecs used for those files as well as AC3 audio.  The only issue with the native player is that it does not bookmark your place, which is why I ended up using Rocklpayer anyway -- when you're watching shows during a commute that can be interrupted at any time, it's a nice feature to jump back in where you left off.     The battery life is tremendous compared to my Evo.  After a series of file installations and large file transfers, the battery was down to 91% from a fully charged state.  I think the Evo would have gone to 60% going through the same processes.  Not having to deal with cell phone standby helps the battery a lot.  It's also helpful that I can simply turn off the GTab when not in use since I still use my Evo for all my communications.  After playing with  the Tab for a few more hours, it was down to 83%.  These numbers are tremendous if you stack them up against the Evo.  Once I got home, I proceeded to transfer 3GB of video files over wireless using Webshare.  The throughput was around 23mbps, a big increase over the 15mbps I get on my Evo.  This took a major hit on my battery, as it dropped to 60% by the time the girls were in bed and I plopped down on the couch.  I was on remote desktop continuously from 8:30pm to 1:30am and finally hit 3% and decided to recharge.  In contrast, 5 hours of remote desktop on my Evo required a battery change.  So for the Tab to do this at under 60% charge is quite remarkable.  I will have to see how the Tab holds out without any charging during the day since I don't have any spares for the 2amp charger and 30 pin cable (the Evo reused all the same stuff as the Touch Pro 2, so I had spare batteries and chargers from day one).   The downside to this battery life is that the charging is quite slow.  After it hit 3%, I turned it off and charged it.  By 7:30, or 6 hours later, it was only at 2/3 charge.  That's really just painfully slow.  Another user I know says it only takes him a few hours to fully charge, so I'll have to do some troubleshooting and asking around the internets.   The other downsides:   The backlight on the capacitive buttons on the bottom of the unit times out in a matter of seconds, so if it's anywhere near dark, they're invisible almost immediately.  There is no setting to change this.     You cannot have one value for screen timeout and another for screen lock like there is on the Evo, so you have to reenter a code every time the screen goes off.  I just upped my screen timeout to 10 minutes and will see how that affects battery life.  My Evo doesn't require security entry until after 15 minutes while the screen auto shuts off after 1 minute.  As long as it's not off for more than 15 minutes, I don't have to enter a security code.   After using the Tab for 4 hours straight, it started to strain my arms and wrist.  It's not heavy initially, but after a few hours you start to feel it.  In retrospect, that might be more my problem than a Tab issue.   I was disappointed to find that Droid Comic Viewer would not display in full screen.  That lasted a few minutes until I downloaded a different comic viewer that displayed in full screen and had all the bells and whistles I needed (and yes, also free).  I haven't loaded a tons of apps on the GTab yet.  So far, Droid Comic Viewer was the only app that didn't at least scale to full screen (Angry Birds is glorious on the GTab).   I cannot stress this enough -- the Sprint contract model is simply too expensive.  If I were forced to get one, I'd buy the AT&T model off-contract and use it as Wifi only (the extra $50 nets you 14GB internal storgage memory rather than 16GB SD storage like the Sprint & Verizon models).  But even then, there are products like the Viewsonic tab for $380 if you're doing Wifi only that are much more cost effective.  The only reason the Galxay Tab was worthwhile for me was substantial the deal I was able to get through my corporate rep.   While the GTab is worthwhile for me simply because of its remote desktop capability, the multimedia features make it an attractive timekiller.  I will have to play with it much more before I can really conclude whether or not it's a worthwhile purchase, but at this point, its most compelling feature is that it's really cool.  On a purely functional level, 95% of what you would do with the GTab could be done on the Evo or Galaxy S or Droid X, just smaller.  But then again, I own the Evo, so if you're still a Razr owner, perhaps a Galaxy Tab would prove to be much more than just bigger.

#2 of 110 ONLINE   Hanson

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Posted December 02 2010 - 02:15 AM

Update:


After a complete battery drain, the Tab charged fully in 4 hours.  Not sure why it was so slow the first time.


The stock media player has a bookmark feature, but it's not automatic.  However, I rediscovered (as I had read this elsewhere) that RockPlayer cannot play 720p video regardless of extension or codec.  So it's a good thing it bookmarks.


I am able to stream certain media from a network share on my PC using ES File Explorer.  This feature is available on all Galaxy S phones, but not on my Evo.  It's pretty cool and doesn't require any transcoding on the server side, but it chokes on mkv files (keeps restarting) and will not stream avi or mpg files.  A nice tech demo, but the bulk of my files are not in the mp4 streaming file format that works the best with it.


There is a really weird transition after spending hours on the tab and then picking up the Evo where the Evo just looks and feels tiny on my hand, like it's an HTC Aria.  It takes me a while to shake it off.  I will say that as much as I feel like the Evo can do 95% of what the Galaxy Tab does, I'd rather do 60% of the things I used do on my Evo on the GTab.  Remote Desktop and video are the two main features where the Tab smokes the Evo, and web browsing is right up there.  Audio related stuff I leave to my Evo as well as picture taking.


The YouTube app on the GTab over Wifi is brilliant.  Everything loaded immediately and I didn't experience a single hiccup.  A more seamless video experience than I get on my desktop.


The pixel density is on the GTab isn't that great (171 ppi to the iPad's 132 ppi).  It's okay for most video, but HD animation really shows the pixel structure.  Don't get me wrong, the larger screen trumps the higher pixel density of the Evo so I'd much rather watch that way (plus the Evo can't even handle 720p video), but they need to get ppi in the upper 200's for future devices.


Someone I know has the GTab and uses it as a Citrix server client.  He can't rave about it more.  His laptop sits in his car unused for the most part, and since he's in the field a lot, he relies on the GTab to remote in and work from client sites.


I seem to be getting comparable transfer speeds with ES File Explorer compared to WebSharing.  Since the latter requires desktop interaction, I might just stick with ES File Explorer to transfer files to and from the PC.  The ability to access network shares this easily is killer.



#3 of 110 ONLINE   Hanson

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Posted December 03 2010 - 04:34 AM


I have my new favorite way to transferring files from the PC to the Tab now.  It's something I tried on the Evo that didn't work.  But it's flawless on the Tab.   1) Turn on WebSharing 2) Remote desktop into a PC 3) Create network folder for the Tab 4) Drag and drop files to and from the network folder   Like I said, I tried this with the Evo but RDP and WebSharing would not run simultaneously at the time.  Maybe I'll try again.  It's such an easy way to move files back and forth.  If you have a Galaxy S phone, it should work the same way.  I can even have WebSharing running on the Evo and Tab and then move files between the two devices using the PC as the intermediary.   Turns out the stock video player does auto save your place (unless it force closes).  I may have been mixing up my video players when I observed that it would not.  My only complaint is that it is missing a skip ahead button.  I have to drag the indicator manually to move forward X amount of seconds.  One sweet thing -- you can rotate the screen 360 degrees with the video player.  That's really handy because in normal landscape mode, the headphones stick out from the bottom left.  That makes it a bit uncomfortable and a bit awkward to hold since the headphone plug sticks into your hand (it's the same way on my Evo).  Once I flip it upside down, the headphone plug ends up on the upper right hand side of the device and out of the way.   The GTab isn't heavy per se, but it's not the one handed solution that a smaller device like the Evo is.  While I like browsing on the GTab, there's something to be said about skipping around web pages using one hand.  I took the Tab to bed last night, and it was actually a bit uncomfortable lying on my back and reading the internets before conking out.  The Evo is definitely better for this purpose.

#4 of 110 ONLINE   Hanson

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Posted December 16 2010 - 07:47 AM

The one thing I am very impressed with on the GTab is battery life.  Now, granted, the battery is 2 1/2 X the capacity of the Evo battery.  And granted, the Evo has some of the worst talk and standby times in its class.  But the real key here is the lack of cellular service.  I have remarked in other Android threads that voice calls and cell standby eat up most of my battery (currently, they combine for over 60% of the battery use).  The other morning, I unhooked my GTab from the charger in the morning and left it powered on with wifi active and the screen off.  When I got home from work, the battery had dropped to 97%.  That's 3% in 10 hours.  Even if I turned off all the radios on my Evo, I don't think I would have lost that little in the way of battery.  Even after one hour.  It also probably helps that I don't have any push email running on the GTab.  But you can manage battery life through proper engineering.  I hope HTC realizes that as it's designing the successor to the Evo.


And speaking of which, it's no longer a lock that I get the Evo 2 when it comes out, because so many of the functions I cherished on my Evo are simply better on the Tab.  At this point, the Evo is for phone, email, internet, music, and photos.  The GTab handles everything else.  I don't need the Evo 2 anymore -- in fact, the biggest priority on my next phone will be the camera and really nothing else.  Any Android phone nowadays can handle the basics -- the camera will be the sole deciding factor.  I have the GTab for everything else.



#5 of 110 ONLINE   Hanson

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Posted December 17 2010 - 07:37 AM


I've been getting lots of turned heads in public and questions about my GTab lately.  After having it for a few weeks now, I've come around a bit on the pricing.  I was disappointed in the $600-$650 price tag since I had every intention of using it as wifi only, and if that's your intention, a $489 16GB iPad is a freaking bargain.     But a 16GB 3G enabled iPad is $619.  That's in line with the GTab pricing.  The real bargain is the TMo GTab that has 16GB internal and with a $90 32GB SD card nets you 48GB for $690.  Beats the pants off of the $740 3G iPad with 32GB.  And Tmo has pre-paid, no-contract weekly and monthly plans if you anticipate needing the data access situationally.   But the real question is, can you compare the price of the iPad to the GTab considering the disparity in screen sizes considering The iPad screen is over twice as large as the GTab screen?  There are a great many advantages and disadvantages to having such a large screen.  The obvious plus to a larger screen is that that you can see more or see things larger.  But that has its own set of drawbacks -- you can't comfortably use the iPad without having to set it down, and it won't fit into any pocket.  It's not really something you can whip out and use while walking down the street and you can't thumb type or use thumb controls in games.  I understand the need to redesign handheld apps for use on the iPad, but the Galaxy Tab's tweener size still allows for thumb control.  Angry Birds plays just the same on the GTab as it does on the Evo.   And when it comes to widescreen material, the GTab's wider dimensions means that although it's less than half the size, the actual viewable area is just a 1/3 less in size.  Couple that with the higher pixel density and the ability to hold it up to your face, the GTab video experience is comparable if not better than the same on the iPad.  On my commute, I can hold the GTab up and look straight ahead while iPad users I've seen have to sit hunched over to watch it on their lap.   So in many ways, the price isn't really a function of the size since the size itself affects functionality.  The GTab wins for video, ebooks, and remote access.  The iPad wins for magazines/comic books and web surfing.  Productivity goes to the iPad, but the GTab owns portability.  And that's probably the main reason to choose one over the other.   I still think the Galaxy Tab price point should be around $400, but since Samsung decided to sell this through carriers instead of direct to retail, the price point got stuck at $600.  Selling through carriers was the only way Samsung could maintain the ruse that the GTab is a mobile device, a point that is essential for Google to allow for Market access and Google apps.   My bet is that when Honeycomb becomes the official tablet OS, you will see wifi-only 7" tabs for $400 retail.  If you have that kind of patience, I would probably hold out until the middle of next year before buying an Android tablet.  But I am loving the hell out of my GTab for now.  My Evo sits lonely in the charger now that the GTab has landed.

#6 of 110 OFFLINE   ManW_TheUncool

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Posted December 17 2010 - 08:07 AM

Maybe I'll eventually consider a 7" Android tablet (w/ 4G capability) as well, especially if an Android smartphone works out great for my wife.  But yeah, $600 seems too steep for something like this -- IMHO, the added 3G/4G functionality shouldn't cost significantly more since it requires a paid dedicated data plan to use (vs something that can be shared w/ your smartphone, etc).


I thought about the new WiFi-only Archos tablets coming out this month for $250-350, but looking closer at specs suggest they might not be quite up-to-par although they're probably the best of the also-rans (vs the various crappy Chinese "knockoffs").  I might still end up getting one depending on how the smartphone thing goes, and might just pass it along to my son as a present of some sort w/in a year or so (since he lost the old iPod Touch)...


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#7 of 110 OFFLINE   Sam Posten

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Posted December 17 2010 - 03:38 PM

Thanks for your review Hanson.  Keeping tabs on this one (hehe) this one starts off with some positives then goes downhill:

http://www.tested.co...-review/47-225/


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#8 of 110 OFFLINE   DaveF

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Posted December 19 2010 - 11:32 AM

Hanson, I've been reading your ongoing review. It's Interesting. It's ironically amusing that I would argue for a smaller, denser phone screen and you'd argue for a larger less dense screen — and now you suggest a smaller denser tablet screen (and Id probably prefer the converse) :D How does the expanded memory work from a use experience? On the iPad, apps and data are invisibly handled; the user has no sense of location. On the GTab, is it the same with an SD card? Or is there any explicit division of the memory between integrated and additional? Does the user have to think about where stuff is stored?

#9 of 110 ONLINE   Hanson

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Posted December 20 2010 - 01:35 AM

Well Dave, the big difference between the GTab and Evo with regard to pixel density is that I don't see the Evo pixel structure unless I hold it up to my nose and look for it.  The GTab has visible pixel structure as it is -- the iPad is worse.  I did point out that future tablets really need ppi's in the upper 200's.

Android allocates a certain amount of memory to apps, since the storage memory can be accessed as a mounted USB drive.  For the CDMA models, there is 2GB on board for applications and OS.  On the GSM models, the 16GB is split out as 2GB and 14GB partitions.  If you add a memory card, it becomes a third partition.  Both internal and SD storage can be mounted as a removable disk drive.  The app space cannot.


Apparently, the WP7 phones that have SD slots do a one time format to create a unified memory space.  But that formatting permanently renders the SD card unreadable in Windows or any other OS, and I believe if the SD card craps out, you have to factory reset the phone since it's like losing a drive on a RAID0 setup.





#10 of 110 OFFLINE   DaveF

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Posted December 20 2010 - 02:29 AM

So I don't understand the Android app & memory system. I've got 4.5 GB of apps on my iPhone. That's not possible on an Android device? When you add an app or data (music, movie, etc), you have to specify which of three partitions it goes to? From you descriptions, I see how the 7" form factor is good for the urban commuter. But I'm still amused that you want a giant phone and a petite tablet, and I want the opposite. :)

#11 of 110 ONLINE   Hanson

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Posted December 20 2010 - 04:09 AM

For the programs that have the API, all Android devices as of froyo can move apps to SD.  This leaves a small amount of info on the app partition and moves the bulk of the program files to SD.  I'm not sure what your 4.5GB of app data entails -- is this just executable files or does this include associated data like games saves and maps and such?


And yes, app space is an issue in Android, although the judicious application of Apps to SD alleviates the issue for froyo users.  And 2GB is a luxury -- my Evo only has 500MB of app space.  I haven't had to struggle get by, but there are some users who will install anything that moves, and they run into an issue where they max out their app space.


Now that I have the 7" GTab, I really don't need such a huge phone anymore.  All things in Android being equal (web browsing, music playing, etc), my next phone will be the one with the best camera regardless of size.  I loved the Evo form factor because it was the largest screen in its class.  But the GTab has essentially turned my Evo into a messaging device, and the 7" GTab screen has made the screen size on my phone a moot point.



#12 of 110 OFFLINE   DaveF

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Posted December 20 2010 - 07:19 AM

I don't know the particulars of my apps. ITunes reports that I've got 4.5 GB of apps. Now, I know that TomTom is a 1.5 GB app and the bulk of that would be map data. Likewise. I've got a number of games that would have a chunk of data in graphics and sound data. Maybe that's stored outside the "app" space in Android so the 2GB cap isn't so noticeable. And maybe most people - like my dad for example - would never come close to even a 2GB app usage.

#13 of 110 ONLINE   Hanson

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Posted December 20 2010 - 08:00 AM

Associated data files like maps and graphics files are saved on the SD cards for most games.  The Gameloft games will have 20MB of program files, but the bulk of the data (200-250MB) resides on the SD card.  I suspect that all of that data is considered "apps" in iOS.


I have noticed one salient effect of the GTab takeover -- since I'm on the GTab at home, I rarely check my messages now.  Texts and emails that used to be replied to in seconds aren't viewed for hours.  I'm also not taking as many pictures and uploading them to Facebook as I used to.  My mother-in-law scolded me for falling behind on the daily picture updates after failing to post for 10 days.



#14 of 110 ONLINE   Hanson

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Posted December 21 2010 - 03:09 AM

As I reiterate with almost every post, one of the GTab's huge advantages is its pocketability.  Maybe not for the skinny jeans and T-Shirt crowd, but cargo pants, a windbreaker with an inside pocket, and any sundry coat or purse is capable of ferrying the GTab.  Which brings up an interesting divide between the iPhone+iPad combo versus the Android phone+GTab combo -- with the former, you won't be carrying the iPad with you everywhere, which means you need a certain level of duplication between the two devices.  But if you make the GTab an "always on you" device like a phone, you can split duties between the two.  And when you do that, something interesting happens -- the convergence that led to your phone being an all-in-one device starts diverging again, and the many of the functions that engineers worked so mightily on shoving into a <4" phone no longer need to be on a phone.  With the ability to send and receive email in addition to text messages, you could really get a GTab and a flip phone and be done with it.  Now, the GTab is probably not considered portable by enough people to be always on you.  But a 7" device with a foldable OLED screen that can close up like a clamshell could lead to the rebirth of the separate Tablet PDA and de-evolution of the smart phone into very small feature phones.



#15 of 110 OFFLINE   ManW_TheUncool

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Posted December 21 2010 - 07:39 AM

I forget now, but can the GTab actually be used as a phone (via headset w/ option of speakerphone, but w/out needing VOIP)?


If yes and you really plan to have it always w/ you, maybe it really can replace a smartphone for some folks.  Certainly, if I ever get such a tablet w/ full phone capability (not just via VOIP), I'd give that approach a try. Posted Image


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#16 of 110 ONLINE   Hanson

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Posted December 21 2010 - 07:57 AM

The European versions have 3G voice call capability (via headset only), but the US carriers vetoed that out of hand.  So no 3G voice in this country.



#17 of 110 ONLINE   Hanson

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Posted December 23 2010 - 03:06 AM


It's should be noted that most of the Galaxy Tab reviews are based on the Verizon model since it was the first one out of the gate.  Oddly, each carrier's model sport different specs than the other:   http://www.galaxytab...on-att-tmobile/   Now, there is a typo there -- the Sprint GT has 512MB of RAM, not 12MB.  But the Samsung site verifies that the Verizon model has no DRAM and 592MB of RAM:   http://www.samsung.c...ZKASPR-features   So out of the gate, the Verizon model has 40MB of less RAM, and none of the faster DRAM.  There are lots of reports that the non-Verizon models are faster and less laggy than the Verizon model, and if the reviews are based on the Verizon hardware set, then they are selling the other carrier models short.  In other words, some of the problems noted in the GTab reviews are specific to the Verizon model and aren't replicated across the board.   That said, there are certain arguments against the GTab I've read in reviews and elsewhere that are rather specious:   "The apps/OS aren't optimized for tablet"   Seriously? Maybe if the GTab were 10" there would be an issue, but most apps stretch out to fill the screen and Spare Parts (a free app) stretches any program to fill the screen. In the meantime, it's still small enough to play games using your thumbs whereas different mechanics are needed on the iPad. I play Angry Birds in the Evo and GTab, and there is no difference in experience. Considering the form factor, what needs to be optimized, exactly?   "The browser isn't smooth"   From the people who put tremendous import in how many apps there are for the iPad, the idea that someone could download another browser to replace the stock one is somehow a critical problem.  If you use, say, Dolphin HD and turn Flash on demand rather than preloading, it isn't any slower than Safari on iPad. We've had these "Flash or no Flash" debates before, but for most people, the ability to view Flash video is a huge advantage.  And there are indications that the imminent release of Flash 10.2 for mobile will offload the playback to the GPU, a difference that will change the way Flash works on mobile and work out current issues with stuttery playback and audio/video sync problems.  If that promise is realized, Flash will become an even greater killer app.   "It's only a little bigger than the Evo/it's too small to be useful"   Really? The GTab is 162% larger than the Evo. It's substantially bigger than the Evo. That's over 2 1/2 times bigger. It's about as wide in portrait mode as the Evo is in landscape. To say it doesn't give you a different experience because "it isn't much bigger" is incorrect.  I'm not sure how the 2.7" difference between the Evo and GTab is "minor", yet the same 2.7" difference between the GTab and iPad is "huge".  After a few weeks of ownership, it's not really a matter of having certain tasks I prefer to do on my GTab over my Evo as much as it is there are certain tasks I will only do on my GTab anymore.  I don't bother watching video on my Evo anymore.  I only use Remote Desktop on the Evo if the GTab is charging.  Many games, including Angry Birds, are GTab exclusive.  And no, I haven't needed to sand down my finger to a quarter of its size to use them -- that's the most specious conclusion on the matter as has ever been uttered.   I think that many of the reviews focus on what the GTab doesn't do that the iPad does and not vice-versa.  While they're both tablet devices, the difference in form factor make them fundamentally different kinds of devices.  The iPad is designed for resting on a lap or desk and has to be carried in a bag or portfoilio. The GTab is designed for holding in one hand and fits into pockets.  And I don't think many of the reviewers really understand this fundamental difference, probably because they're comparing the two side by side at a desk.  It's when you step away from the desk that the advantage of the GTab becomes abundantly clear.   BTW, kudos to Samsung for focusing this point in their marketing.  The GTab commercials all show the user walking around and holding it in one hand.  It's exactly what differentiates the two platforms.

#18 of 110 OFFLINE   DaveF

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Posted December 23 2010 - 01:38 PM

Im curious how the tablet sizes evolve in the coming years. When I first saw the iPad my first thought was, it's a bit small. Having spent a bit more time with one, I see that 10" is a decent compromise. I've not seen the GTab so have no experience with a 7"'tablet. As with computer monitors and tvs and phones, I expect well see a variety of tablet sizes to meet the diversity of budgets and needs. The immediate weakness is that there are too few tablets to gauge what people really want. There's no 10" Android tablet nor any 7" 'iPads. But once Android is officially usable for tablets, I presume there will be all sizes and configurations of tablets. android will likely provide the beat random study of what size people prefer. I wonder if well see clean separations between 7"'for urbanites and 10" for suburbanites :)

#19 of 110 ONLINE   Hanson

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Posted December 23 2010 - 02:08 PM

I have a feeling that had the iPad been 7", it would have been perfect while a later 10" Android tab would have been considered too big and unwieldy.



#20 of 110 OFFLINE   Ken Chan

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Posted December 26 2010 - 08:05 AM

The 4:3 ratio is better for usage in both portrait and landscape. With 4:3, 10" is the minimum to get a "full-size" on-screen keyboard. People can do touch-typing on that keyboard. Thinner and lighter will always be better, especially to Steve; but given how the weight is almost evenly distributed between the glass, the screen, the batteries, and everything else, improvement will be incremental. Battery life is also a big feature, and that must be preserved or improved.


Steve has also said -- apparently not clearly enough -- that the 10" size is also the minimum for "tablet UI". You combine the hardware and software factors, and the iPad is 10" because it has to be. That is the sweet spot, perhaps until we get Star-Trek-reliable voice command.