-

Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Your personal biggest Oscar upset?


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
53 replies to this topic

#21 of 54 Mikael Soderholm

Mikael Soderholm

    Second Unit

  • 452 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 05 1999
  • Real Name:Mikael Söderholm
  • LocationStockholm, SWEDEN

Posted December 01 2010 - 09:25 AM

Although there are some fine examples above, which I, mostly, agree with, the first thing that came into my mind when I read the thread title was 1998, when Kim Basinger beat Julianne Moore (in Boogie Nights) and Gloria Stuart (in Titanic) for best supporting actress. I think that was when I lost interest in the Oscars...


Then I saw that the topic was best picture, but by them I was already worked up enough to post anyway ;)

It still is, after all, my biggest Oscar upset.


/Mikael

- "Do you indulge in any form of worship?"
-"Life. I love life, very much indeed."
David Bowie interviewed by Russell Harty, 1973

#22 of 54 Jonathan Peterson

Jonathan Peterson

    Second Unit

  • 292 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 21 2006

Posted December 01 2010 - 09:30 AM

E.T. winning for best visual effects instead of Blade Runner. Wrong, just plain wrong.



#23 of 54 Mark-P

Mark-P

    Screenwriter

  • 2,247 posts
  • Join Date: Sep 26 2005
  • Real Name:Mark Probst
  • LocationCamas, WA

Posted December 01 2010 - 09:37 AM

This thread is entitled "personal" biggest Oscar upset, so I don't expect anyone to agree with my opinions, but for me:

1981: Chariots of Fire - it should have been REDS

1995: Braveheart - it should have been APOLLO 13



#24 of 54 Walter Kittel

Walter Kittel

    Producer

  • 4,658 posts
  • Join Date: Dec 28 1998

Posted December 01 2010 - 09:39 AM

In terms of omissions, I was extremely disappointed when Ian Holm did not receive an acting nomination for The Sweet Hereafter.  The film did receive two Academy Award nominations for Direction and Writing (Atom Egoyan) but was really (IMHO) under-represented.  The same year, the incredible Eve's Bayou got zip from the Academy.  Not really surprised, but disappointed.


Edit: On the other hand two of my favorite Academy Award winning films have been mentioned in this thread in the pejorative sense - Chariots of Fire and The English Patient.  Win some, lose some. Posted Image


- Walter.


Fidelity to the source should always be the goal for Blu-ray releases.

#25 of 54 Mark-P

Mark-P

    Screenwriter

  • 2,247 posts
  • Join Date: Sep 26 2005
  • Real Name:Mark Probst
  • LocationCamas, WA

Posted December 01 2010 - 09:45 AM


Speaking of injustices in the visual effects department, for 1995, "Apollo 13" should have won over "Babe" I'm sorry, but making animals' mouths move is not nearly impressive as digitally recreating all the NASA stuff from scratch.

Originally Posted by Jonathan Peterson 

E.T. winning for best visual effects instead of Blade Runner. Wrong, just plain wrong.





#26 of 54 Steve Christou

Steve Christou

    Executive Producer

  • 14,281 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 25 2000
  • Real Name:Steve Christou
  • LocationLondon, England

Posted December 01 2010 - 10:15 AM

John Williams not winning for Superman the Movie.


Jerry Goldsmith not winning for Star Trek the Motion Picture.


Ennio Morricone not winning for The Mission.


Danny Elfman not even nominated for Edward Scissorhands.


Dave hören... auf, wille stoppen sie Dave... stoppen sie Dave... Mein gehirn geht... Ich bin gefühl es... Ich bin gefühl es... Ich bin ängstlich Dave... Guter Nachmittag. Ich bin ein HAL 9000 computer. Ich wurde funktionsfähig am HAL-Betrieb in Urbana, Illinois auf January 12 1992.


Lord of the Hubs


#27 of 54 mattCR

mattCR

    Lead Actor

  • 9,998 posts
  • Join Date: Oct 05 2005
  • Real Name:Matt
  • LocationOverland Park, KS

Posted December 01 2010 - 10:25 AM



Originally Posted by Walter Kittel 

In terms of omissions, I was extremely disappointed when Ian Holm did not receive an acting nomination for The Sweet Hereafter.  The film did receive two Academy Award nominations for Direction and Writing (Atom Egoyan) but was really (IMHO) under-represented.  The same year, the incredible Eve's Bayou got zip from the Academy.  Not really surprised, but disappointed.


Edit: On the other hand two of my favorite Academy Award winning films have been mentioned in this thread in the pejorative sense - Chariots of Fire and The English Patient.  Win some, lose some. Posted Image


- Walter.


Eve's Bayou is one of those films that surprised me how good it was.  Still think that's a phenomenal, under appreciated work.  I love the Sweet Hereafter also, but too damn depressing for it to have repeat watch value.


trakt.tv

Ask Me about HTPC! (Threads in HTPC / PMs always responded to)

This signature is povided by MediaBrowser 3 Trakt Plugin: Media Browser 3


#28 of 54 WillG

WillG

    Producer

  • 5,218 posts
  • Join Date: Jan 30 2003

Posted December 01 2010 - 10:44 AM


 and frankly story wise it makes no sense.  How does Matt Damon end up with Tom Hanks memories? 

 Can't tell if that is a serious question. But, I don't believe the audience is supposed to be thinking that Damon is channeling Hanks and literally recalling his story. It's just a transition from one person's POV to another's.


STOP HIM! He's supposed to die!

#29 of 54 Michael Elliott

Michael Elliott

    Lead Actor

  • 7,125 posts
  • Join Date: Jul 11 2003
  • Real Name:Michael Elliott
  • LocationKY

Posted December 01 2010 - 11:07 AM

I would defend many of the nominations being brought up in this thread.  Certain films just need time to get their credit.  RAGING BULL is a masterpiece but I'd say a lot of people throught OP was the better movie in 1980.  Many critics voted RB as the greatest film of the decade yet when you look at their Top 10 from 1980, RB isn't #1 and on some lists it isn't in the top 10.

THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH won Best Picture because it was a lifetime award to DeMille.


The same with Bogart beating Brando.

The same, probably, with John Wayne winning for TRUE GRIT.


The show has always had dark spots but for me personally it's gotten a lot worse in recent years.  With Bullock winning last year I'm happy to turn my back on the show as being nothing more than trash.  You can't even call her winning a "Lifetime" award because she hasn't done anything in her career to make her worth winning.  The actresses from PRECIOUS and AN EDUCATION did more in these one performances than Bullock will do in her career.


As a film buff I'm always going to be interested in who wins but some of the winners over the past few years just go beyond any common sense.  It's not like THE BLIND SIDE is going to get better ten years from now like something like RAGING BULL did.

The politics have also gotten to hot my my tastes here lately.  I love Sean Penn and he's my favorite actor but him winning over Rourke wasn't right IMO.  The same with CRASH winning Best Picture or Charlton Heston not getting any cheers when his picture was shown after his passing.



#30 of 54 Jacinto

Jacinto

    Second Unit

  • 411 posts
  • Join Date: Jul 08 2002
  • Real Name:Jacinto
  • LocationLittleton, Colorado

Posted December 01 2010 - 11:20 AM

What I find most interesting is the investment people have in certain films winning over others. I loved both Goodfellas and Dances With Wolves. I would have been fine with either winning. I loved both Saving Private Ryan and Shakespeare In Love, although I find Shakespeare In Love far more rewatchable. I would have been fine with either winning. I loved Forrest Gump, Pulp Fiction, and Shawshank. I would have been fine with whichever won. I loved Crash and Brokeback. I would have been fine with either winning. I loved Braveheart and Apollo 13. I would have been fine with either winning. 1995 is probably my toughest year, and that's because what I have problems with is great films not even getting the recognition of a nomination. As much as I love Braveheart and Apollo 13, in my eyes the two best films of that year were Se7en and Heat, neither of which was even nominated. That to me is the graver injustice than which film actually won the award over another excellent film.


Chachi Hernandez
Illustrator

 


#31 of 54 Russell G

Russell G

    Lead Actor

  • 9,764 posts
  • Join Date: Sep 20 2002
  • Real Name:Russell
  • LocationDeadmonton

Posted December 01 2010 - 12:52 PM

Originally Posted by WillG 


 Can't tell if that is a serious question. But, I don't believe the audience is supposed to be thinking that Damon is channeling Hanks and literally recalling his story. It's just a transition from one person's POV to another's.

Ha ha, not a "serious" serious question, but an example of what I found to be incredibly sloppy screen writing with the sole purpose to manipulate the audience.  If I recall correctly, you see an old man walk up to a grave, then it zooms in on his eyes and you hear war sounds.  Then it cuts to Tom Hanks and the war.  that's pretty solid film speak for "This is the memory of the guy the camera is zooming in on, his point of view".  You see this device in films dating back to the silent days. Then Speilberg pulls the weasel so the audience has to watch an old man break down in front of his family.  The movie would of been better without that slop, but it's Spielberg, the good outweighs the bad ultimately.  The bit between the old man bookends was good enough for me. :)



#32 of 54 MatthewA

MatthewA

    Producer

  • 6,177 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 19 2000
  • Real Name:Matthew
  • LocationSalinas, CA

Posted December 01 2010 - 04:36 PM

Hindsight is 20/20. I usually dislike all these threads and articles because no one can predict what current films will stand the test of time when choosing the best film of the year, because time hasn't yet administered the test. But even I have my beef with the Oscars (which I've ignored lately for the same reasons I've ignored most current, mainstream American movies).


Best Picture:


1952: Singin' in the Rain was not nominated, likely because An American in Paris took home the prize last year. Of the nominated films, I would personally have given it to The Bad and the Beautiful (I shamefully admit to never having seen High Noon).


1968: I have no problem with Oliver!, one of the best musicals of the decade, taking home the prize, but I agree 2001: A Space Odyssey should have at least been nominated. Does anyone anywhere believe Rachel, Rachel deserved the nomination more?


1982: Gandhi over E.T. Even Richard Attenborough agrees.


1988: I was never impressed with Rain Man in and of itself or when compared to A Fish Called Wanda, Mississippi Burning, or Who Framed Roger Rabbit.


1997: Titanic: Don't love it, don't hate it, don't think it was the Best Picture of the year. I think people were relieved that it wasn't a total debacle; people seem to have forgotten the hype about the cost overruns, its falling way behind schedule, and the fact that James Cameron had to sell his interest in the film to finish it.


2002: I liked Chicago when I saw it, and it's the last winner I've actually seen, but I like it less and less as time goes on. I don't think it was Best Picture caliber, but Miramax is based on the French word for "shameless Oscar grab", and it had been 34 years since a musical won it.


2009: Ten nominees. Listen to Neal Gabler's NPR interview about "cultural inflation"; he expresses my feelings much better than I do.


If they screw over Toy Story 3 this year then it's over between Oscar and I. I know the Academy has a bias against anything perceived as a children's film, but I'll watch a good movie for kids over a bad movie for adults any day.


Best Actor:


1965: Christopher Plummer not nominated for The Sound of Music. The more I watch the film, the more I appreciate his contribution to it.


Best Actress:


1965: Julie Andrews, who won last year, loses the award for The Sound of Music.


Best Supporting Actor:


2005: George Clooney. Totally political award to honor this terrible actor for saying the right things, and his acceptance speech was the most hubristic in Oscar history. His career proves that connections mean everything in this business.


Best Adapted Screenplay:


1965: Ernest Lehman's epic task of adapting The Sound of Music for the screen went unnoticed by the Academy, but at least the award went to a worthy adversary (Robert Bolt for Doctor Zhivago).


Best Song:


1967: "Talk To The Animals", an above-average song from Doctor Doolittle, over the superior "Bare Necessities" from The Jungle Book, or "The Look of Love," the best thing about Casino Royale.


1977: Debbie Boone's awful, overplayed "You Light Up My Life" over any of the other nominees, especially the moving "Candle on the Water" from Pete's Dragon, and considering that "New York, New York" wasn't nominated, nor were any of the songs from Saturday Night Fever (if AM radio ballads were the in thing with Oscar voters, "How Deep is Your Love" should have been a shoo-in). I would have given the award to any other song from a movie that year. And I'm actually a fan of 1970s adult contemporary, for god's sake! You can tell I hate that song.


1979: The now-iconic "Rainbow Connection" from The Muppet Movie over the now-forgotten "It Goes Like it Goes" from Norma Rae.


1986: The bland "Take My Breath Away" from Top Gun over the beautiful "Somewhere Out There" from An American Tail or even "Glory of Love" from Karate Kid II.


1999: "When She Loved Me" from Toy Story 2 loses. I don't even care who it lost to, just the fact that this song lost bothers me.


2002: Eminem's "Lose Yourself" from 8 Mile over anything with a melody.


Enough is enough, Disney. No more evasions or excuses. We DEMAND the release Song of the South on Blu-ray along with the uncut version of Bedknobs and Broomsticks on Blu-ray. I will not support anything your company produces until then.


#33 of 54 Colin Jacobson

Colin Jacobson

    Producer

  • 5,228 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 19 2000

Posted December 02 2010 - 02:53 AM



Originally Posted by Michael Reuben 

I can't say I've ever been troubled by a film winning, because voting often produces quirky results. But the following must be said:


Saving Private Ryan, while technically impressive, may be the most overrated film in Spielberg's canon.


Disagree - I think "Schindler's List" takes that prize.


When the dull, long-winded "Gandhi" beat "ET", I threw my shoe at the TV...


Colin Jacobson
http://www.dvdmg.com

#34 of 54 Steve Christou

Steve Christou

    Executive Producer

  • 14,281 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 25 2000
  • Real Name:Steve Christou
  • LocationLondon, England

Posted December 02 2010 - 02:58 AM



Originally Posted by Colin Jacobson 



When the dull, long-winded "Gandhi" beat "ET", I threw my shoe at the TV...



...and when A Beautiful Mind beat The Fellowship of the Ring I threw myself at the TV...



On the Gandhi DVD seems even Richard Attenborough was upset that his film beat E.T.  :)


Dave hören... auf, wille stoppen sie Dave... stoppen sie Dave... Mein gehirn geht... Ich bin gefühl es... Ich bin gefühl es... Ich bin ängstlich Dave... Guter Nachmittag. Ich bin ein HAL 9000 computer. Ich wurde funktionsfähig am HAL-Betrieb in Urbana, Illinois auf January 12 1992.


Lord of the Hubs


#35 of 54 Russell G

Russell G

    Lead Actor

  • 9,764 posts
  • Join Date: Sep 20 2002
  • Real Name:Russell
  • LocationDeadmonton

Posted December 02 2010 - 03:06 AM

Lesson to be learned... sit in the back of the room when watching the Oscars with Colin or Steve....  :P




Quote:

Originally Posted by Colin Jacobson img/forum/go_quote.gif



When the dull, long-winded "Gandhi" beat "ET", I threw my shoe at the TV...


Originally Posted by Steve Christou 





...and when A Beautiful Mind beat The Fellowship of the Ring I threw myself at the TV...



On the Gandhi DVD seems even Richard Attenborough was upset that his film beat E.T.  :)



#36 of 54 Russell G

Russell G

    Lead Actor

  • 9,764 posts
  • Join Date: Sep 20 2002
  • Real Name:Russell
  • LocationDeadmonton

Posted December 02 2010 - 03:17 AM


Quote:

Originally Posted by Colin Jacobson 




Disagree - I think "Schindler's List" takes that prize.


When the dull, long-winded "Gandhi" beat "ET", I threw my shoe at the TV...


I agree.  "Schindler's List" seems to have been made just to get an Oscar.  It was practically advertised as such. It's not a bad movie, just an obvious one.   I thought "The Pianist" did a better job of that type of story.  "The Pianist" lost to "Chicago", another one of those actor showcase type pictures.  "Catherine Zeta Jones can sing and dance?!!?!?  In a MOVIE?!?!  Actors are the greatest!  Best picture!"


I'm being unfair though, I'm yet to see "Chicago", it looked terrible to me. It might be a decent movie, but I doubt as good as "The Pianist", "Gangs Of New York", or "The Two Towers". :P


That's the other thing that irks me about the Oscars.  There was a lot of press about "Fellowship of the Ring" and "Two Towers" being passed over for "Return Of The King".  As if in the case of "Return Of The King" being crap, then the academy wouldn't be embarrassed of giving best picture nods to the first two.  What the hell is that about?  A movie is a movie, the politics involved are crushing. "Fellowship" was just as good, if not better then "Return Of the King", and a huge achievement.  The Best Documentary section is a joke when it come to the awards and the politics involved.




#37 of 54 mattCR

mattCR

    Lead Actor

  • 9,998 posts
  • Join Date: Oct 05 2005
  • Real Name:Matt
  • LocationOverland Park, KS

Posted December 02 2010 - 11:11 AM



Originally Posted by MatthewA 

1977: Debbie Boone's awful, overplayed "You Light Up My Life" over any of the other nominees, especially the moving "Candle on the Water" from Pete's Dragon, and considering that "New York, New York" wasn't nominated, nor were any of the songs from Saturday Night Fever (if AM radio ballads were the in thing with Oscar voters, "How Deep is Your Love" should have been a shoo-in). I would have given the award to any other song from a movie that year. And I'm actually a fan of 1970s adult contemporary, for god's sake! You can tell I hate that song.


1979: The now-iconic "Rainbow Connection" from The Muppet Movie over the now-forgotten "It Goes Like it Goes" from Norma Rae.


1986: The bland "Take My Breath Away" from Top Gun over the beautiful "Somewhere Out There" from An American Tail or even "Glory of Love" from Karate Kid II.


1999: "When She Loved Me" from Toy Story 2 loses. I don't even care who it lost to, just the fact that this song lost bothers me.


2002: Eminem's "Lose Yourself" from 8 Mile over anything with a melody.



These sometimes make me a bit sick, I can't even think about two of them.


Candle in the Water is one of the most underrated Disney belts.. ever.   Helen Reddy just absolutely destroys the audience with that one






When She Loved me is a classic; Tarzan one that year for "You'll Be In My Heart" which wasn't bad.. but "When She Loved Me" is gutwrenching.


I've always felt the song category is too often bought by a combination of "buzz" and politic, with too little about real quality.


trakt.tv

Ask Me about HTPC! (Threads in HTPC / PMs always responded to)

This signature is povided by MediaBrowser 3 Trakt Plugin: Media Browser 3


#38 of 54 MatthewA

MatthewA

    Producer

  • 6,177 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 19 2000
  • Real Name:Matthew
  • LocationSalinas, CA

Posted December 02 2010 - 01:10 PM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Bender 

Eddie Murphy should of won for Dreamgirls over Alan Arkin for supporting actor.

Maybe if Norbit hadn't come out before voting finished… Posted Image


Quote:

Originally Posted by mattCR 

Candle in the Water is one of the most underrated Disney belts.. ever.   Helen Reddy just absolutely destroys the audience with that one






I've always felt the song category is too often bought by a combination of "buzz" and politic, with too little about real quality.


"Lighted by a prayer" is probably the most difficult passage to sing in any Disney song I can think of, because it's 2 1/2 bars with no room to breathe. Ironically, the Oscars were sometimes slow little slow to pick up on new musical trends (the Beatles never got a nomination for any of their films' songs), but other times they did follow trends ("Last Dance", one of Donna Summer's biggest hits, from Thank God it's Friday, won in 1978).


The Best Song Oscar can be as bad as the Grammys sometimes.


Enough is enough, Disney. No more evasions or excuses. We DEMAND the release Song of the South on Blu-ray along with the uncut version of Bedknobs and Broomsticks on Blu-ray. I will not support anything your company produces until then.


#39 of 54 Chris_T

Chris_T

    Stunt Coordinator

  • 208 posts
  • Join Date: Sep 29 2000

Posted December 03 2010 - 07:01 AM


 ...and when A Beautiful Mind beat The Fellowship of the Ring I threw myself at the TV... 


Posted Image



#40 of 54 Yee-Ming

Yee-Ming

    Producer

  • 4,329 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 04 2002
  • Real Name:Yee Ming Lim

Posted December 05 2010 - 08:18 PM



Originally Posted by Mark-P 


Speaking of injustices in the visual effects department, for 1995, "Apollo 13" should have won over "Babe" I'm sorry, but making animals' mouths move is not nearly impressive as digitally recreating all the NASA stuff from scratch.



IIRC, NASA astronauts on being shown the work in progress apparently thought that the producers had managed to find additional archive footage that they hadn't previously seen.  So if the men who were really there were fooled into thinking effects work was the real thing, who are we to question otherwise?