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Blu-ray Reviews

HTF BLU-RAY REVIEW: Back to the Future 25th Anniversary Trilogy Blu-ray - Recommended



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#1 of 45 OFFLINE   Kevin EK

Kevin EK

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Posted October 26 2010 - 06:05 PM

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BACK TO THE FUTURE

25TH Anniversary Trilogy


Studio: Universal

Original Release Years: 1985, 1989, 1990

Length:  1 hr 56 mins, 1 hr 49 mins, 1 hr 59 mins

Genre:  Comedy/Science Fiction/Time Travel


Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1


BD Resolution: 1080p

BD Video Codec: VC-1 (@ an average 30 mbps)

Color/B&W: Color


Audio:

English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 (@ an average 3.5 mbps)

French DTS 5.1

Spanish DTS 5.1


Subtitles: English SDH, French, Spanish


Film Ratings: PG (Mild Violence, Mild Language, Mild Sexual Suggestiveness)


Release Date: October 26, 2010


Starring:  Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd, Thomas F. Wilson, Lea Thompson and Mary Steenburgen (Part III only), with Crispin Glover (Part I only, footage recycled for Part II)

Written by:  Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale

 Directed by: Robert Zemeckis


Overall Film Rating:    3/5 (First Film:  3 ½/5, Second Film: 2 ½/5, Third Film, 3/5)


It’s strange to be talking about the 25th Anniversary of Back to the Future when I remember seeing the movie in the theater around the time that it first opened in Los Angeles.  I remember having a lot of fun at that screening, and particularly enjoying the tongue-in-cheek ending that practically screams for a sequel.  And I remember wondering how the heck the filmmakers would top what I had just seen.  Of course, things didn’t exactly work out in the manner I had thought at the time, but the resulting trilogy is never less than interesting, and the third film is a refreshingly sweet piece of work.  I’ll discuss a bit more about the movies in the next paragraph, but I’ll cut right to the chase first.  The Back to the Future trilogy makes its debut on Blu-ray with this release, nearly 4 months after the 25th Anniversary of that theatrical release.  The new release incorporates pretty much everything from the prior standard definition release from 2002, and adds in new 1080p transfers and some new featurette material.  If you already purchased the standard definition DVD releases (both in the 2002 trilogy set and in the later, individual, releases), the real question will be about the transfers.   And there have certainly been some questions raised here on this forum about the transfers.  Some people are saying the transfers look great, some people are saying that they have been “scrubbed clean” of grain and detail.   I can say that I clearly see grain in many shots, usually when there are no visual effects involved.  I can also see a lovely high definition picture on all three films.  There are definitely shots where the grain is much less present, but I certainly have not seen the kind of DNR waxwork faces that I’ve heard worries voiced about in the forum.   To my eye, this is the best these films have ever looked or sounded in a home theater.


Looking back at Back to the Future, it’s hard to keep in mind that the movie was essentially made as a comic romp, using a sci-fi catalyst from “mad scientist” Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd) to project Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) 30 years into the past, to encounter his parents (Crispin Glover and Lea Thompson) when they were roughly his age.  Since his initial meeting with them potentially causes his parents never to meet (and thus negates his own existence), Marty spends the movie not only trying to get back to 1985 but also trying to play matchmaker for his own parents.  The fun of the movie is that it never takes itself seriously – in fact, it delights in going over the top in as many ways as possible, usually involving either a quadruple take by Doc Brown or a delightfully strange line reading by Crispin Glover as the henpecked George McFly.   The ending of the first film has had different receptions depending on the mindset of the viewer.  When I first saw it in 1985, I thought this was a pure wish-fulfillment ending, with Marty having somehow changed his family for the better, only to be yanked out of time once again by Doc Brown.  Looking at the ending today, I can clearly see that this was intended more as an ironic joke on 80s materialism, and that the triumphant ending of the flying DeLorean time machine is more of a punchline than a signal of future stories.  As is now acknowledged by the filmmakers, no sequels were seriously contemplated until Back to the Future became not only a monster hit, but the highest grossing film of 1985.  (And I should note that this was in a summer of no less than 3 Steven Spielberg-produced movies – for the record, the others were The Goonies and Young Sherlock Holmes.)  With that big of a hit, it was a no-brainer that somebody would get Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale to figure out where and when the flying DeLorean went, and what the consequences might be.


Near the holiday season of 1989, Back to the Future Part II premiered in theaters, and I recall getting into a theater to see it on its opening weekend.  When the movie ended, I remember a feeling of vague disappointment, tempered only by the trailer for Part III tacked onto the end credits.   Looking over the movie today, that sense of disappointment is magnified.  Part II starts out with a quick answer to the end of Part I, with our heroes arriving in a cartoonish vision of 2015 that is so far removed from our current reality that the intended satire lands with a lot more punch.  After a few funny references to the 80s, the movie actually replays a series of set pieces from the first film, only this time within the new futuristic setting – including Marty’s introduction to the town square and the local soda shop, and a replay of the town square skateboard chase using hover technology.   Things then switch to a dark vision of the “present day” of the movies, as we learn that the trilogy’s villain, Biff (Thomas F. Wilson) has managed to change history to better his own fortunes at the expense of everyone else.   This is the one original segment in the film, but even today it still leaves a pretty nasty aftertaste.  To solve this problem before it happens, the film has Doc Brown and Marty return to 1955 for a replay of the climactic events of Part I that generates some laughs and a lot more confusion.  (There is a precedent for this in that the end of the first film finds Marty seeing himself in a scene from earlier in the film – for the second film, this situation is multiplied tenfold.) Once things have apparently been put right once again, another freak accident provides the catalyst for the third chapter in the trilogy.  I should note that one of the big problems I had here stems from a sudden change in the primary characters, particularly Marty.  Where in the first film, we see him as the discouraged son of a never-do-well family (“No McFly has ever amounted to anything in the history of Hill Valley”, etc…), but we can see he has a pretty decent head on his shoulders.  Once we get into the sequels, we are asked to accept that Marty’s hitherto-unrevealed Achilles Heel is that he loses all self-control if anyone ever calls him a chicken.  This is a setup for the major problem of the third film, but it also comes completely out of left field.  At the same time, we are asked to accept that the meek and mild Biff of the end of the first film is actually a villain waiting to pounce – which effectively obviates the point of what happened to him.  Further, the loss of both Crispin Glover and Claudia Wells takes a bit of the steam out of the enterprise.  Glover’s performance is one of the most blissfully odd ones I have ever seen, and at the same time, it’s quite moving.  Wells’ Jennifer is a quieter and more subtle interpretation of the character than would be seen in the sequels, and one wonders how her performance might have worked out.   Finally, and I realize this one is due to the sequels not having been thought about in advance, the entire initial premise of Back to the Future Part II flies in the face of what was set up in the punchline ending of the first film.


The final film in the trilogy, Back to the Future Part III, is a welcome respite from the trickery of the second film.  While it revisits a few of the touchstones of the original film, it also recasts many of them in terms of a classic Western, which the film effectively sends up for much of its running time.   The film quickly sends Marty off from 1955 to 1885, where the real plot unfolds for Marty and the Doc.  There’s still a lot of the familiar comic references:  Marty takes the name “Clint Eastwood” to travel incognito, but also manages to use some great tricks from the Sergio Leone spaghetti westerns to stay alive.  But there are also some clever reinventions of the characters and character types we have seen.  Biff the school bully is here represented by his ancestor, a “Mad Dog” gunman terrorizing the just-forming town of Hill Valley.  The strict school principal is here the marshal of the town.  And the set piece to power the famous DeLorean up to 88 miles per hour is a truly inspired idea, which makes for a thrilling climax to the inset western we’re watching.   The conclusion of the film (and the trilogy) feels a bit dated today, and it certainly owes a major debt to the conclusion of The Wizard of Oz.  But even though the situation is preposterous on its face, the ending still brings a smile to the face and a good feeling.


Taken today as a trilogy, the films clearly show their age and their roots in the 80s.  They’re still a lot of fun, particularly the first film, and there’s still a lot of invention onscreen in the third film, to run the risk of a terrible pun here.  If you saw the films in the theaters over 20 years ago, there’s an almost doubly nostalgic effect from watching them today.  The movies themselves are nostalgic for a fantasy version of the 1950s, and these days, we can see in them a kind of fantasy version of the 1980s.   Younger viewers may not find as much to identify with, and they may not be as impressed with the effects or the set pieces, but I think there’s a solid throughline of clever scriptwriting, and some very appealing characters, again particularly in the first and third films.  I would certainly recommend readers who haven’t seen these films to at least rent the first one, and if they have as good a time as I think they will, to continue on to the others.


With this release on Blu-ray, the Back to the Future trilogy willhave been released on DVD three times, including a 3-movie set in 2002, and then individual releases with a little bit more by way of extras.  The Blu-ray is the first time it’s been available in high definition on disc.  As I’ve done with prior titles like Psycho, I’ll enumerate the special features that stem from the prior releases.  Almost all of the extras are culled from that 2002 trilogy set, including commentaries for each film, a generous collection of featurettes, Q&As and photo/art galleries, and the original trailers for the movies.   When the movies were made available individually, another extra was added – the footage from the Universal Studios Tour ride based on the movies. 


The new Back to the Future 25th Anniversary Trilogy Blu-ray carries over nearly all the content from the prior DVD releases, this time using 1080p VC-1 transfers and DTS-HD MA 5.1 sound mixes.  A series of new featurettes have been produced in high definition as well, and some Blu-ray U-Control functionality has been added into the mix in place of the old trivia track that could be found on the original DVDs.  The new transfers have been a source of much discussion on this forum and elsewhere, so I’ll say again right away that I did not see the issues that plagued the releases of Out of Africa and Spartacus.  On the contrary, these transfers have been carefully done, with a lot of additional detail visible along with the grain.  I’ll get into more detail about the grain below, but I will say unequivocally that I did not find this release to be the DNR problem that many readers have feared.   So fans of the movie have a choice on their hands now – if they already own the earlier DVDs, do they want to upgrade to high definition?  In my opinion, if you have a large enough HDTV to be able to really see the 1080p transfer, then, like the recent Psycho release, this will likely be worth your time.  If not, I’d recommend at least renting the Blu so you can evaluate it for yourself and watch the additional special features.   Either way, this Blu-ray is Recommended.

                                                       

VIDEO QUALITY   4/5

Back to the Future 25th Anniversary Trilogy is presented in a trio of 1080p AVC 1.85:1 transfers that reveal a lot of fine detail in addition to a lot of fine grain, depending on the shot in question.  I have to acknowledge that the grain level is not consistent on a shot-by-shot basis.  Some shots, particularly ones that do not involve visual effects, have much more noticeable grain than others.  For example, a late hallway scene between Marty and his teenage parents after the big dance has quite noticeable grain to it.  A late series of shots of the DeLorean in the third film also has noticeable grain to it, while also showing more detail to the car’s front end than I believe I have ever seen before.  At the same time, I also noticed a little trouble when it came to rendering things like Marty’s coat during his big guitar performance in the first film, or the DeLorean’s wheel details in the second film – but I have to acknowledge that this issue may be a result of my HDTV doing 3:2 pulldown.  I’m going to take a moment here to address something brought up in a thread here at HTF – where a review from another site mentioned that they felt that in the first film, in the scene where Marty and Doc Brown suit up and reload the plutonium into the DeLorean, that it was felt that the scene had been “scrubbed clean” of grain, and that the actors look like “mannequins” and that the environment looks like a “digital creation”.  Having specifically watched that scene just now for myself, I’m going to respectfully differ with that opinion.  On some shots – a close-up of a glass canister ejecting the plutonium into the vehicle, I did not see grain on the glass.  But I did see a low level of grain in all the shots around that one.  And the actors absolutely did not look like mannequins! I’ll be happy to listen to the readers of this forum if they should disagree on this point, but I think that these transfers are quite good.  I should note that I am watching the film on a 40” Sony XBR2 HDTV. If anyone is watching the film on a larger monitor and is having issues, please post them on this thread.



AUDIO QUALITY   4/5

Back to the Future 25th Anniversary Trilogy is presented DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mixes in English, along with standard DTS 5.1 mixes in English and French.  The HD mixes are a lot of fun to hear, with a healthy amount of music and atmosphere in the surrounds.  In just one example – Marty’s first encounter with the DeLorean at the Twin Pines Mall at 1:16am – the surrounds are visited by a passing freight train in the distance, and for a moment I wondered if this was in my speakers or something I’d never heard before in my neighborhood.  So I rewound the moment and sure enough, the sound was in the speakers, not reality.  Memorex would be pleased.


SPECIAL FEATURES      4/5

The Blu-Ray presentation of the Back to the Future trilogy preserves almost all of the extra features that have been available on prior DVD editions, with some exceptions and alterations.  The trivia tracks from the DVDs have been replaced with a Blu-ray U-Control Trivia track that has been updated in the 8 years since the original DVD release.  There are also some screenplay excerpts from the original 2002 DVD edition that did not carry over to the new Blu-rays, but I don’t find these to be a major loss.  There was also a DVD-Rom "Total Axcess" full screenplay feature that has not carried over.  Most of the materials that have carried over from the original DVDs are presented in their original standard definition format.  However, the deleted scenes are presented in new 1080p AVC transfers – which doesn’t change the fact that many of these scenes are clearly from distressed tape copies.  I’ll enumerate what extras you can find on each disc, and which materials are actually new to this edition.



Disc 1:


Feature Commentary with Bob Gale and Neal Canton   (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – Writer/Producer Bob Gale and producer Neil Canton provide a scene-specific commentary, loaded with plenty of production information.  Bob Gale dominates the track, and he has a lot to say about how the movie was put together. 


Q & A Commentary with Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale   (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – This commentary is actually an audio recording of a question and answer session with Zemeckis and Gale, with the questions and discussions at hand having to do with this film.  Robert Zemeckis is a quite entertaining speaker, and he goes over a lot of the same ground that Gale does on the scene-specific commentary, but it’s fun to listen to the guys one way or the other.


Deleted Scenes – (10:44 Total, 1080p)  (REMASTERED IN 1080p FOR BLU-RAY) Eight deleted scenes from the film are presented in 1080p AVC transfers.  These are all additions that do not necessarily help move the story along, hence their removal from the film.  (I’m not sure what more we get from a scene of George McFly being locked in a phone booth.)  There is an option to watch any or all of these scenes with commentary by Bob Gale.  And there is a “Play All” function for convenience.   I should note that the picture quality here, regardless of the 1080p transfer, isn’t all that great.


Archival Featurette: The Making of Back to the Future – (14:29, 480p, Full Frame) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) This is an EPK puff piece done in 1985 to promote the first film.  It’s interesting today for archival purposes, in that it shows then-current interview footage with Steven Spielberg and the principals of the movie, along with film clips and on-set film.  There’s nothing deep here, but the featurette itself is a kind of time capsule now.


Archival Featurette: Making the Trilogy: Chapter One – (15:31, 480p, Full Frame)  (FROM THE 2002 DVD) This is a more candid featurette, made by Laurent Bouzereau, including current-to-2002 interviews with the available principals about what went on during the making of the first film.  The initial casting of Eric Stoltz is discussed, and several still photos are presented to show what the film looked like with Stoltz in the lead role, before Zemeckis decided to recast him about a month into the shoot.  The crazy schedule of filming with Michael J. Fox during all hours when he wasn’t on “Family Ties” is also addressed, by Fox himself and by Zemeckis and Gale. 


Tales From The Future: In the Beginning (27:24, 1080p) (NEW FOR THIS BLU-RAY) – Here we have a brand-new featurette, presented in high definition, produced again by Laurent Bouzereau.  It essentially covers the same ground as the “Making the Trilogy” featurette for this film did, only it includes current-to-2010 interviews with many of the same principals.  I should note that there is an unintential effect of seeing the current interviews after viewing materials from 8 and over 20 years prior.  Michael J. Fox suffers from Parkinson’s Disease, and in his new interviews, his condition has progressed quite considerably from the milder symptoms seen in the earlier materials.  This can be very difficult to watch, given that he is clearly struggling here.   This first section includes material on the casting of all of the actors that goes into much greater detail than we have seen before, including candid material from Christopher Lloyd and Claudia Wells about how they wound up in the film.  This section also includes the three very brief bits of film footage of Eric Stoltz in the role of Marty McFly.   It’s the same material you’ve already seen on the internet – there’s nothing else here to see.  But from these three clips, much more than from the photos included in the earlier DVDs, you can easily see why the decision was made to switch to Fox.  It’s not a matter of the performer being bad or problematic – it’s a matter of the performance feeling like it’s coming from a completely different film than Zemeckis intended to make.


Tales From The Future: Time to Go (29:54, 1080p) (NEW FOR THIS BLU-RAY) – This new featurette includes several production stories from the making of the film.  There’s a great story right off the bat about the head of Universal telling Zemeckis and Gale to use the title “Spaceman from Pluto”, and how Spielberg defused the situation before it got any sillier.  There’s also some interview material with poster artist Drew Struzan (culled from a separate documentary about him) to discuss how he came up with the iconic poster for the movie, and how the actors actually came to pose for him for the posters for the sequels.


Tales From The Future: Keeping Time (5:42, 1080p) (NEW FOR THIS BLU-RAY) – This quick featurette covers the music made for all three films.  There’s some archival footage of Alan Silvestri conducting the score for the first film, and there are also discussions about the work of Huey Lewis for the first film and ZZ Top for the third film.  The best moments here are a recounting of an impromptu jam on the set of the third film between ZZ Top and the local musicians and extras.


Michael J. Fox Q&A (480p, Full Frame) – (FROM THE 2002 DVD) This is an extracted version of some picture-in-picture interview snippets with Michael J. Fox from 2002, in which he discusses many aspects of working on the trilogy.  Like the other archival and current featurette material with him, there is not only a lot of crossover in his accounts of what went on to make the movies, but there is also an almost time-capsule quality here as we can see him at an earlier stage of the disease with which he is fighting.  At this point, the symptoms are present, but nowhere near as overwhelming as we can see in the 2010 material.



Behind The Scenes  - This section encompasses three separate areas:


Original Makeup Tests (2:17, 480p, Full Frame) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – This is a collection of the filmed age makeup tests done with principal actors, including Lea Thompson and Christopher Lloyd.


Outtakes (2:49, 480p, Full Frame) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) –  The film’s gag reel is presented here, including various shots of flubs and missed cues, and one prank in which Michael J. Fox’s whisky flask actually contains the real thing…


Nuclear Test Site Ending Storyboard Sequence (4:11, 1080p) (NEW FOR THIS BLU-RAY) – Here we have a series of storyboards for the originally scripted ending for the film, presented to the tune of several cues from the movie’s score.  This presumably replaces the script material about the original version of the time machine which could be found on the 2002 DVDs.



Photo Galleries  (NEW ARRANGEMENT OF EXISTING MATERIAL) –  Five galleries of material are presented here, separated into sections of Production Art, Additional Storyboards, Behind-the-Scenes Photographs, Marketing Materials and Character Portraits.  From what I can tell, all of this material comes from the galleries included on the original 2002 DVDs, but it’s been rearranged a bit here.  The idea of “Additional Storyboards” stems from the U-Control feature on the Blu-ray which allows the viewer to toggle PIP storyboards for various sequences while they watch the sequences in question.  From what I can see, the “additional storyboards” include a lot of the same storyboards that can be found while watching the PIP feature – it’s just that here they can be viewed on their own.


Music Video: “The Power of Love” by Huey Lewis and the News (6:27, 480p, Full Frame) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – A standard definition copy of Huey Lewis’ signature song from the film is included here in all its 80s glory.


Teaser Trailer (1:24, 480p, Full Frame) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – The film’s original teaser trailer carried over from the original standard definition DVD.  It’s still fun to watch – essentially a long tease leading up to a close-up of Michael J. Fox being asked the question “How far are you going?” and giving the answer “About 30 years!”


Join Team Fox – (6:03) (NEW FOR THIS BLU-RAY) – This is a fundraising spot for Michael J. Fox’s Parkinson’s Disease Research Foundation.  It replaces a much briefer one that was included on the 2002 DVD.


U-Control – (NEW FOR THIS BLU-RAY) The Blu-ray includes three “U-Control” features that can be accessed by going into that part of the main menu.  One is a “Trivia Track” which updates the “Did You Know That?” trivia subtitle feature that was included on the original DVD.  The second is a “Storyboard Comparison” feature that allows you to see the storyboards for various sequences alongside the appropriate shots in the movie.  The third is a “Setups & Payoffs” feature which specifically addresses particular images, moments and ideas that are spotlit earlier in the movie and then paid off later on down the line.  One example of this is the image of Doc Brown hanging from the hands of a clock, and another is the renaming of the Twin Pine Mall to the Lone Pine Mall, based on Marty’s adventures in the past.  All of these features are presented in PIP format, where you can see the text or storyboards in one corner of the screen while the movie goes on around it.  I’ll be honest here – when I used this functionality on my PS3, I got into some sticky problems, where I could not exit the feature or get control over what PIP material I was seeing until I stopped the disc and restarted it.  When I tried the Blu-ray in my laptop, I did not have this problem – but it’s troubling nonetheless – and it’s the second time I’ve seen it.  I had the same issue with the Blu-ray earlier this year for Repo Men.


BD-Live - The more general BD-Live screen is accessible via the menu, which makes various online materials available, including tickers, trailers and special events. 


My Scenes - The usual bookmarking feature is included here.


D-Box– D-Box functionality is available for those home theater enthusiasts who have the proper equipment.





Disc 2:


Feature Commentary with Bob Gale and Neal Canton   (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – Writer/Producer Bob Gale and producer Neil Canton provide a scene-specific commentary, loaded with plenty of production information.  As with the first film, Bob Gale dominates the track, beginning with a particularly startling account of how he and Robert Zemeckis got strong-armed into staying with their contracted salaries for the third chapter.


Q & A Commentary with Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale   (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – The Q & A with Zemeckis and Gale continues into the second film, but there’s nowhere near as much material.  The commentary actually stops long before the film does.


Deleted Scenes – (5:41 Total, 1080p)  (REMASTERED IN 1080p FOR BLU-RAY) Seven deleted scenes and extensions from the film are presented in 1080p AVC transfers.  As with the first film, there’s really nothing all that necessary here.  There is one surprising shot of Old Biff literally vanishing before our eyes after returning to the future, but it goes by very quickly.  (This was presumably Marty’s fate in the first film if he had not succeeded…)  There is an option to watch any or all of these scenes with commentary by Bob Gale.  And there is a “Play All” function for convenience.  


Archival Featurette: The Making of Back to the Future Part 2 – (6:40, 480p, Full Frame) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) This is an EPK puff piece done in 1989 to promote the second film.  It’s similar to the first EPK featurette from the first film, and it’s primarily interesting in the same way – it’s more of a time capsule than anything else.


Archival Featurette:  Making the Trilogy: Chapter Two – (15:31, 480p, Full Frame)  (FROM THE 2002 DVD)  As with the Bouzereau material from 2002 on the first film, this interview/film clip collection has a lot more candid insights than the EPK spot that precedes it.  Bob Gale directly addresses the loss of both Crispin Glover and Claudia Wells from the sequels – the former from a classic example of asking for too much, and the latter from a family illness.  Gale also discusses the other possible versions of the second film, including a third act that would have been set in the 1960s rather than a replay of the original third act. 


Tales From The Future: Time Flies (28:37, 1080p) (NEW FOR THIS BLU-RAY) – This new featurette more or less repeats the same stories as we have seen in the earlier 2002 featurette, including the discussion of the loss of Crispin Glover.  The difference here is that there is discussion with Claudia Wells about what happened to her, in which she clarifies why she could not return, and in which Bob Gale discusses how they had to make the change to recast the part with Elizabeth Shue.


Tales From The Future: The Physics of Back to the Future (8:25, 1080p) (NEW FOR THIS BLU-RAY) – This new featurette is possibly the best part of the new Blu-ray set.  It’s really an interview with physicist and professor Michio Kaku, in which the professor discusses his affection for these movies and gives a little scientific background to them.  He specifies that he likes the idea of energy being harnessed to make time travel possible, but he qualifies it to say that the amount of plutonium put in the DeLorean is far too small to actually accomplish the task.  He also gets into a multiple-universe theory that would account for how Marty McFly could cause his parents not to meet, and yet still return to his own time – in Kaku’s theory, Marty’s interference would generate a complete alternate universe in which he never existed.  (Stop reading now if you’re getting a headache…)  I personally loved this featurette, and I also have to recommend Kaku’s book Physics of the Impossible for those of you who wish to understand scientifically how to do things like travel in time or use warp drive.



Behind The Scenes  - This section encompasses seven separate areas:


Outtakes (0:50, 480p, Full Frame) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) –  The film’s gag reel is presented here, including what looks like a painful bicycle accident for Christopher Lloyd, a shot of Lea Thompson inadvertently burping on camera, and a bit of Michael J. Fox flying above his hoverboard.  My favorite bit here was the menacing postal service guy getting his trenchcoat stuck in a car door…


Production Design (2:11, 480p) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – This featurette focuses on the challenge to the film’s design team to reinvent Hill Valley in a variety of time periods.


Storyboarding (1:31, 480p) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – This featurette focuses on the many storyboards generated to help Zemeckis design the key sequences of the movies.


Designing the DeLorean (3:33, 480p) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – This featurette covers the conversion of a DeLorean to the time machine seen in the movies.


Designing Time Travel (2:42, 480p) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – This featurette focuses on the various concepts and designs Zemeckis and Gale reviewed of how they would show the moment of the time machine breaching the time barrier.


Hoverboard Test (0:58, 480p) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – This is footage of the tests done to see how a wire-hung actor would look when filmed on top of a mounted hoverboard.


Evolution of Visual Effects Shots (5:43, 480p) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – Bob Gale narrates this collection of various visual effects shots from the second film, starting with the sky freeway and the flying DeLorean’s exit into Hill Valley 2015.



Photo Galleries  (NEW ARRANGEMENT OF EXISTING MATERIAL) –  As with the first film, here are five galleries of material are presented here, separated into sections of Production Art, Additional Storyboards, Behind-the-Scenes Photographs, Marketing Materials and Character Portraits.  As I said earlier, this appears to me to be the same material I found in similar archives on the 2002 DVD, and the storyboards include isolated copies of the storyboards that can already be found in the U-Control functionality.


Theatrical Trailer (2:21, 480p, Non-Anamorphic) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – The film’s original theatrical trailer is presented in standard definition.


U-Control – (NEW FOR THIS BLU-RAY) As with the first movie, this Blu-ray includes three “U-Control” features that can be accessed by going into that part of the main menu.  One is a “Trivia Track” which updates the “Did You Know That?” trivia subtitle feature that was included on the original DVD.  The second is a “Storyboard Comparison” feature that allows you to see the storyboards for various sequences alongside the appropriate shots in the movie.  The third is a “Setups & Payoffs” feature which specifically addresses particular images, moments and ideas that are spotlit earlier in the movie and then paid off later on down the line.  All of these features are presented in PIP format, where you can see the text or storyboards in one corner of the screen while the movie goes on around it.  Like I said before, I had a lot of stickiness with this function, and it didn’t make me really want to repeatedly use it.


BD-Live - The more general BD-Live screen is accessible via the menu, which makes various online materials available, including tickers, trailers and special events. 


My Scenes - The usual bookmarking feature is included here.


D-Box– D-Box functionality is available for those home theater enthusiasts who have the proper equipment.





Disc 3:


Feature Commentary with Bob Gale and Neal Canton   (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – Writer/Producer Bob Gale and producer Neil Canton provide a scene-specific commentary, loaded with plenty of production information.  Bob Gale dominates the track, as he did for the first two films.


Q & A Commentary with Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale   (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – Here we have the rest of the Q & A with Zemeckis and Gale, and the final series of questions, as they apply to the final film.  There aren’t that many questions, and the commentary ends even earlier than the brief one heard over the second film.


Deleted Scene – (1:14, 1080p)  (REMASTERED IN 1080p FOR BLU-RAY) A single deleted scene from the film is presented here – the killing of the Marshal by Biff’s 1885 ancestor.  It’s a strange scene, in that it’s the one irrevocable murder presented in the entire trilogy, and yet it ends with a kind of punchline.  There is an option to watch this scene with commentary by Bob Gale.


Archival Featurette: The Making of Back to the Future Part 3 – (7:32, 480p, Full Frame) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) This is an EPK puff piece done in 1990 to promote the film.


Archival Featurette: Making the Trilogy: Chapter Three – (16:20, 480p, Full Frame)  (FROM THE 2002 DVD) Laurent Bouzereau’s 2002 documentary concludes with this candid accounting of how the third film was made on location in Northern California and Monument Valley.


Archival Featurette: The Secrets of the Back to the Future Trilogy (20:41, 480p, Full Frame) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – A promotional TV special for the third film starring Kirk Cameron is included here for posterity.


Tales From The Future: Third Time’s The Charm (17:07, 1080p) (NEW FOR THIS BLU-RAY) – The third film is again chronicled in high definition, with wistful accounts by Zemeckis and Fox about the peacefulness of filming a western on location.  There’s a great interview with Mary Steenburgen about her participation in the film, and her surprise to hear that the filmmakers were quite unsure if she would actually do the movie.  Marc McClure offers a moving nod to deceased cast member Wendy Jo Sperber as part of the discussion here.


Tales From The Future: The Test of Time (17:00, 1080p) (NEW FOR THIS BLU-RAY) – Laurent Bouzereau wraps up his new high definition featurette collection with this accounting of various related projects that have happened since they finished the third film.  The Universal Studios Tour ride is discussed, as is the animated children’s series that ran in the 1990s.  Robert Zemeckis clarifies here that he never intended to make any more than 3 films, and that he has no intention of making any other films about this story.  (To be fair, he was generous in even doing three films when the original story was only for a single film, and he had to really work to stretch the material as far as he did.)



Behind The Scenes  - This section encompasses three separate areas:


Outtakes  (1:36, 480p, Full Frame) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) –  A very quick gag reel is included here, with one shot of the guys incorporating Roger Rabbit into an 1885 homestead scene, and another shot where the saloon regulars completely muff their dialogue.


Designing the Town of Hill Valley (1:08, 480p) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – This featurette covers the construction of the 1885 town version of familiar Hill Valley seen in the third film.


Designing the Campaign (1:18, 480p) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – This featurette focuses on the poster designs for the films, including much of the same material discussed at greater length in the Tales From the Future: Time to Go featurette on the first disc.



Photo Galleries  (NEW ARRANGEMENT OF EXISTING MATERIAL) –  As with the first two films, here are five galleries of material are presented here, separated into sections of Production Art, Additional Storyboards, Behind-the-Scenes Photographs, Marketing Materials and Character Portraits.  As I said earlier, this appears to me to be the same material I found in similar archives on the 2002 DVD, and the storyboards include isolated copies of the storyboards that can already be found in the U-Control functionality.


Music Video: “Double Back” by ZZ Top (4:08, 480p, Full Frame) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – A standard definition copy of ZZ Top’s song from the third film is included here.


Theatrical Trailer (2:19, 480p, Full Frame) (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – The film’s original theatrical trailer is carried over from the earlier DVD.


Faqs About the Trilogy (FROM THE 2002 DVD) – This is a text section that addresses various questions that have been raised about the movies ranging from what the real timeline of the third film was to where a reader could get those self-lacing 2015 shoes and a hoverboard.  This is carried over lock, stock and barrel from the 2002 DVD set.


Back to the Future: The Ride – (31:06 Total, of which 5 minutes is the actual ride, 480p, Full Frame) (FROM THE INDIVIDUAL DVD RELEASES FOLLOWING THE 2002 SET) – Here we have the complete assembly of footage used for the Universal Studios Tour simulator ride based on the film.  About 26 minutes of it is the material that audience members would see on monitors during the final half hour of their wait on line.  The last 5 minutes of this is the actual simulator ride footage, which can be augmented if you have D-Box equipment.  Looking at the footage without the help of D-Box or even the basics of a simulator makes it pretty obvious what’s going on – the audience is being whipped around and through various environments while they appear to chase Biff, who has stolen a time machine and is travelling to the ends of known time on a joyride.


U-Control – (NEW FOR THIS BLU-RAY) As with the first two films, this Blu-ray includes three “U-Control” features that can be accessed by going into that part of the main menu.  One is a “Trivia Track” which updates the “Did You Know That?” trivia subtitle feature that was included on the original DVD.  The second is a “Storyboard Comparison” feature that allows you to see the storyboards for various sequences alongside the appropriate shots in the movie.  The third is a “Setups & Payoffs” feature which specifically addresses particular images, moments and ideas that are spotlit earlier in the movie and then paid off later on down the line.  All of these features are presented in PIP format, where you can see the text or storyboards in one corner of the screen while the movie goes on around it.  I’ll repeat here that I found this feature to have a lot of stickiness.


BD-Live - The more general BD-Live screen is accessible via the menu, which makes various online materials available, including tickers, trailers and special events. 


My Scenes - The usual bookmarking feature is included here.


D-Box– D-Box functionality is available for those home theater enthusiasts who have the proper equipment.  This will be particularly helpful for viewing “The Ride”.


Digital Copy - Separate discs containing digital copies of each film are included beneath the Blu-ray discs in the packaging.



The film and special features are subtitled in English, French and Spanish.  The usual pop-up menu is present, along with a complete chapter menu.  I need to note that these films take an extra long time to load, even on a PS3.   I’m not sure why, but I counted load times that went upwards of 3 minutes at times.  I actually stopped discs on a couple of occasions and tried it again to confirm the problem.  Once the first disc loads, I have regularly been seeing Blu-ray trailers for Get Him to the Greek and Robin Hood, as well as the more general Universal Blu-ray trailer.


I must also take note of the packaging style for these Blu-rays.  As Robert Harris has noted, this is an extremely frustrating manner of packing DVDs.   For quite some time, I thought the only way to get the Blu-rays out of their holders was to press down on the right or left plastic at the midpoint of the disc.  I have since learned that the proper way is to pull the disc down on the two plastic levers on the bottom and then pull it out.  This didn’t go well the first time I tried it, wherein I broke the plastic levers!   For the person who asked about this in another thread – yes, this is the same bad idea as the way the Blu-rays for The Office: Season 6 were packaged.  I’ve wracked my brain searching for a polite adjective for this, and Robert Harris’ experience has given me one:  Infuriating.


IN THE END...

Back to the Future:  25th Anniversary Trilogy is a fine Blu-ray edition of Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale’s trio of movies about Marty McFly, Doc Brown and their famous DeLorean.   Almost all of the extras from the earlier standard definition DVDs have been carried over, along with some new materials.  Much of the new material does repeat what we have seen before, but there are some nice touches, including the glimpse of Eric Stoltz, some new discussions with Claudia Wells and Mary Steenburgen, and a fun discussion with Michio Kaku.  The centerpiece of this Blu-ray set, though is the new 1080p picture transfer and the DTS-HD MA sound.  And the high definition picture and sound are quite good – despite what I’ve heard and read around the web about picture quality concerns.   Fans of these films will likely want to pick up the new transfer, albeit with the caveat that they have a screen large enough to really see the added detail of 1080p.  I am happy to recommend this set for purchase, again with a caveat that the packaging can be quite maddening, and with another caveat that if the reader already owns the earlier DVD releases, he or she may want to rent this first to see if the new transfer and the new extras justify the double dip.


Kevin Koster

October 26, 2010. 



#2 of 45 OFFLINE   Adam Gregorich

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Posted October 26 2010 - 07:33 PM

Thanks for all the detail on the special features.  FWIW I agree with you on the picture ratings.  I didn't see the issues with Marty's coat that you mentioned on my 120"+ screen, and don't recall seeing any issues with the car wheels in the second film, but I would want to double check.  I would recommend this as an upgrade for people who currently have the DVD set.


#3 of 45 ONLINE   Nelson Au

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Posted October 27 2010 - 05:32 AM

This is a really complete review! Great effort Kevin! It will take some time to read everything! So I'll be checking out sections as I have time. I appreciate reading your perceptions of the 3 films when you saw them and then your impressions of them watching these blu rays. I had not thought too much about the characters. I have not seen these films in a while so it will be good to watch them with an open mind and hopefully a new way to see some of the things you saw. How Marty changes from the first film in the sequels, etc.



#4 of 45 OFFLINE   Xenia Stathakopoulou

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Posted October 27 2010 - 09:44 AM

This has to be the most complete review ive read so far for the trilogy. I was pleased to read your comments about the video quality.Posted Image


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#5 of 45 OFFLINE   Zack Gibbs

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Posted October 27 2010 - 11:02 AM

I'd like to discuss some of your comments about the second film;

Originally Posted by Kevin EK 


I should note that one of the big problems I had here stems from a sudden change in the primary characters, particularly Marty.  Where in the first film, we see him as the discouraged son of a never-do-well family (“No McFly has ever amounted to anything in the history of Hill Valley”, etc…), but we can see he has a pretty decent head on his shoulders.  Once we get into the sequels, we are asked to accept that Marty’s hitherto-unrevealed Achilles Heel is that he loses all self-control if anyone ever calls him a chicken.  This is a setup for the major problem of the third film, but it also comes completely out of left field.


I don't think it's apt to say Marty's Achilles heel is to be called 'chicken.' This is just the devise the film uses to showcase his insecurity when his conviction is in question. And that's very much a part of his character from the first film. It's depicted in a more broad way I suppose, but I certainly wouldn't say it's "completely out of left field."


At the same time, we are asked to accept that the meek and mild Biff of the end of the first film is actually a villain waiting to pounce – which effectively obviates the point of what happened to him


I'm not sure what you're saying here. The meek and mild Biff is the result of the last 30 years, which were obviously unkind, starting with George standing up to him at the dance in the first film. He's still probably an asshole, but he has no power to abuse.


The Rich and Powerful Biff is also a result of the last 30 years, where he's spent a lifetime unable to lose, and is extremely wealthy and powerful. This is essentially not the same Biff at all.

Finally, and I realize this one is due to the sequels not having been thought about in advance, the entire initial premise of Back to the Future Part II flies in the face of what was set up in the punchline ending of the first film.


I don't know what you mean here either, are you talking about a specific plot point? Maybe the line about the kids?


---


My only complaint about BTTF part II has always been that its time traveling premise defies the entire setup of the first film. There, Marty travels through time, the past gets changed, history is altered, and he has to set things right or he'll disappear forever having meddled with the timeline. It plays fast and loose with the premise in order for the story to work, but that's okay.


In the sequel, Marty travels through time, the past is changed, history is altered, but now Marty is immune from these changes because... _______. There's really no explanation here.


---


Also in Part III there are two Deloreans, the one Doc went back in, and the one Marty went back in. But they just ignore this.


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#6 of 45 OFFLINE   robbbb1138

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Posted October 27 2010 - 11:30 AM

Marty's problem with being called "chicken" that comes out of left field in the second one never bothered me, just because I've come to expect this sort of thing in sequels.


#7 of 45 OFFLINE   Kevin EK

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Posted October 27 2010 - 04:35 PM

Thanks for the responses, guys.

Zack, you've taken some time and thought here, and I appreciate that.


Regarding "Marty the Chicken", I agree with you that his insecurity is right in line with his "what's the use" attitude from the first film.  (from the feeling of his family is a failure, his band is a failure and he's a failure - all the while with the audience knowing he's capable of more than this, as he shows during the film)  My problem is that we suddenly start seeing scenes of "What's the matter, ya CHICKEN?" followed by a looming close-up of Marty, and then another scene with either Doc Brown or Lorraine grumbling that Marty can't handle people calling him a chicken.  It just felt tacked on to me - as a device to set up what nearly turns into a fatal problem for him in the 3rd film.  You're right that it's a much broader way of giving Marty a problem - for me it really felt like the filmmakers were looking for a problem to give Marty that they could tie up fairly easily with the 3rd film.


Regarding Biff the Meek and Biff the Terrible, you're absolutely right that the Biff we see in the alt 1985 in the second film is a version of the worst parts of Biff taken to the nth degree.  This is clearly the school bully on a 30 year winning streak, abusing anyone and everyone he can.  My issue was with that sudden looming close-up of older Biff right before the credits roll at the beginning of the film, where he says with some menace, "WHAT THE HELL IS GOIN' ON?".    The Biff we had seen at the end of the first film probably is a jerk, just as you said - but I think there's something farther under the surface in the ironic ending of the first film.  Before Marty goes back in time, his father is a complete pushover who is "just no good at...confrontation...", his mother is a lush, and Biff is his father's nasty co-worker who continues to take advantage of him just like he did in high school.  After the situation at the dance between George, Lorraine and Biff, something drastically changes here.  George learns he can confront the Biffs of the world and win - he becomes a much stronger person, and therefore a much better husband and father.  Lorraine in turn has a much happier life and doesn't turn to booze to drown her sorrows.  And Biff is humiliated - to the point that he can't find a patsy like the old George, and so that when we see him at the end of the film, he's quite timid.  He tries to pull a fast one on George, who sees right through him, and he gets humiliated again.  And we can tell that this happens all the time - he will always be trying to get away with something, but you're right - he has no power, and nobody believes him.  I didn't get a feeling of massive resentment lurking under that - more that he and George have switched places in terms of their fortunes and their attitudes.  For the second film, we are suddenly asked to believe that there is this undercurrent of anger which will eventually lead him to take his revenge by taking the Almanac back to his younger self.

Your note also points out an additional contradiction that the film needs in order to make the situation work - Old Biff from 2015 not only changes history, but manages to get the DeLorean back to what should be an altered 2015 and stagger out of the car before disappearing in one of the deleted scenes.  He has to be able to do this for the guys to get the car back, but it makes no sense in terms of the story logic of the first film.  And your point about Marty's immunity from time changes (as well as Jennifer's - where Doc Brown says that the correct 1985 will simply form around her if they fix everything - HUH?) is well taken.


My point about the 2015 section of the second film flying in the face of the ending of the first film was that there are story contradictions which stem from the guys having never intended to write more than a single movie.  The end of the first film where Doc Brown tells Marty to bring Jennifer as there's a problem with their kids is a punchline - this time the problem's not with you or your parents, it's with your KIDS, etc.  (By the way, it's instructive to watch both the end of the first film and the beginning of the 2nd one just to see the different performances - particularly between the two Jennifers)  When they actually made the 2nd film, they realized quickly that they didn't want to make a big deal out of having Jennifer along for the ride, as they wanted to focus on Marty and the Doc - so they had her put to sleep almost immediately.  They realized they had to set something up about Marty and Jennifer's kids, so they created the situation we see - but it's obvious that the real problem at hand is Marty and the way he ruined his life due to not being able to handle anyone calling him a chicken.   We can try to accept that Doc Brown is hoping to avoid this coming out, and that he's just using Marty's resemblance to his son to help get him out of a jam, but this justification falls apart really quickly as the 2015 section runs along.  I hear where you're coming from that this may not be a contradiction - for me, it was just another sign of shorthand writing.


And you're absolutely right about the presence of the two DeLoreans in the 1885 timeline - although by this point, we have seen multiple people and DeLoreans at several points during the movies.  At the end of the first film, Marty arrives back in 1985 before the other DeLorean leaves, and he sees himself from a distance at the Lone Pine Mall.  In the second film, there are 2 DeLoreans in the entire 1955 section of the film, along with 2 Doc Browns, 2 Marty McFlys, and even 2 Biffs.  This is the kind of thing that tends to give me a headache...


Thanks again for your thoughts.  You made me think a little clearer about the movies.




#8 of 45 OFFLINE   WillG

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Posted October 28 2010 - 03:18 AM


 My point about the 2015 section of the second film flying in the face of the ending of the first film was that there are story contradictions which stem from the guys having never intended to write more than a single movie.  The end of the first film where Doc Brown tells Marty to bring Jennifer as there's a problem with their kids is a punchline - this time the problem's not with you or your parents, it's with your KIDS, etc.  (By the way, it's instructive to watch both the end of the first film and the beginning of the 2nd one just to see the different performances - particularly between the two Jennifers) 




Check out this youtube clip, it shows a side by side comparison of the end of BTTF1 and the beginning of BTTF2 it pretty neat. I like were in BTTF2 when Marty asks if they become "assholes" this time Doc has to pause for a brief moment before telling Marty "no"


The real problem with the premise of BTTF2 is that there should have been no reason for them to go to the future. What's the use of jumping forward in time to prevent something that is going to happen. Also Doc keeps saying in all three movies how they shouldn't have knowledge of their own futures and whatever is going to happen they'll find out through the natural course of time (admittedly Doc ends up breaking this rule by reading Marty's letter regarding his death in 1985). But, even if Doc decided to tell Marty about his family in 2015, there's no reason to travel to the future. He could have just told Marty about the incident with his Son in 1985 and let the rest work itself out in 2015. And anyway, what happens when the fix the incident and Marty goes back to 1985, he'll just end up having to deal with it again.


Still, I'll accept the premise because they were written into a corner from the end of the first film, and that the whole 2015 section is just a big McGuffin to get Biff back to 1955 with the Sports Almanac


And yeah, in BTTF3 why couldn't they have just went and got the DeLorean that Doc stashed in the mine in 1885 for Marty to find again in 1955? And one more issue I don't see brough up much, in BTTF1 Marty specifically asks Doc if the DeLorean runs on ordinary gasoline to which Doc says no. Doc, I guess could just have been refering to the flux capacitor. But it would seem odd to answer in the negative to that question if the operation of the car does involve gasoline. And when Marty first gets to 1955 and he fails to get the car started, the film then immediately shows the empty plutonium gauge (and of course the movie doesn't really explain how the car manages to run again on the night of the storm). So let's say after Doc goes into 2015 and gets the Mr. Fusion conversion, the engine of the car is also converted to run on gas, in BTTF3 doc says the engine runs on gasoline "it always has."   Should have said something like, ever since I had the plutonium chamber removed, the engine was fixed to run on ordinary gasoline"


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#9 of 45 OFFLINE   Josh Dial

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Posted October 28 2010 - 03:18 AM



Originally Posted by Zack Gibbs 


Also in Part III there are two Deloreans, the one Doc went back in, and the one Marty went back in. But they just ignore this.



Actually, they don't ignore this.  In fact, Marty *specifically* mentions that there are two DeLoreans, and asks Doc why they can't just use that one to fix the other.  Doc replies that if they mess around with the care even slightly, they risk damaging it, which would be very bad.


Also, from the point of view of the car in the cave, at one moment in time, there are actually FOUR DeLoreans at the same time Posted Image



#10 of 45 OFFLINE   WillG

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Posted October 28 2010 - 03:40 AM


 Actually, they don't ignore this.

Hmm, I don't remember this dialogue at all. But, now that I'm thinking about it, the reason they couldn't use the DeLorean in the mine was because it was damaged and all Doc could do was stash it until 1955 Doc could repair it.


But again, couldn't they have just fixed the fuel line on Marty's DeLorean and siphoned some gas from the stored DeLorean?


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#11 of 45 OFFLINE   ChadMcCallum

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Posted October 28 2010 - 05:26 AM

Doc would have drained the gas from the stored DeLorean before sealing the mine up. The gas would have eaten through bits of the car in the 70 years it was stored which would have caused 1955 Doc an even bigger headache. I assume Doc used the gas for some other purpose prior to Marty arriving in 1885 and didn't have any left.



#12 of 45 OFFLINE   Kevin EK

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Posted October 28 2010 - 09:12 AM

Josh, just to confuse everybody, I'm going to take the multiple DeLorean idea further and posit that we actually max out at 3 DeLoreans.


And BTW I believe the novelization of BTTF3 mentions that Doc drained the gas out of the car in the cave.


According to the movies' timeline:


In 1885, Doc Brown arrives in the BTTF2 DeLorean and stores it in a cave.   In his initial timeline (where Marty doesn't come back to get him), that car is the only DeLorean around for 70 years.  And even when Marty does go back to get him, we max out at 2 DeLoreans in 1885 until Marty takes his car back to the present.  And either way, Doc's DeLorean stays in the cave.


In 1955, Marty from BTTF1 arrives in town with his DeLorean, taking us to 2 cars at the same time.   And a little later in 1955, Marty and Doc from BTTF2 arrrive in town with a third DeLorean.  As we watch, Doc Brown's DeLorean gets hit by lightning and sent back to 1885.  Now there are two cars in the area.  Next up, Marty from BTTF2 goes back to the town square just as Marty from BTTF1 uses another lightning bolt to get back to the present.  This leaves just the one car in the cave, which Marty and 1955 Doc dig out and use for Marty to go back to 1885.


I'd say more but I've run outtatime...



#13 of 45 OFFLINE   Mark-P

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Posted October 28 2010 - 11:02 AM



I think Josh is correct that there were four DeLoreans at one time in BTTF Part II - The one in the cave, the one Marty from part I arrived in, the one Biff from 2015 arrived in, and the one Doc and Marty arrived in to fix the skewed timeline. But I supposed one could argue that the one in the cave wasn't there yet until Doc was thrown back into 1885. To quote Captain Janeway, "These cause-and-effect paradoxes give me a headache."


Originally Posted by Kevin EK 

Josh, just to confuse everybody, I'm going to take the multiple DeLorean idea further and posit that we actually max out at 3 DeLoreans.




#14 of 45 OFFLINE   Adam Gregorich

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Posted October 28 2010 - 11:45 AM

This BTTF "time travel DeLorean math" is getting confusing.  So let me get this strait.  If a DeLorean leaves Twin Pines Mall in 1985 traveling at 88MPH....  Posted Image



#15 of 45 OFFLINE   Paul D G

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Posted October 28 2010 - 07:45 PM



Originally Posted by WillG 

And yeah, in BTTF3 why couldn't they have just went and got the DeLorean that Doc stashed in the mine in 1885 for Marty to find again in 1955?



Originally Posted by Zack Gibbs 

In the sequel, Marty travels through time, the past is changed, history is altered, but now Marty is immune from these changes because... _______. There's really no explanation here.



The reason Marty was disappearing in the first one is because he had prevented his parents from falling in love (thus getting married, thus having him).  This is why he was disappearing.  Nothing else that happens in 2 and 3 are related to his parents meeting so, yes, he's unaffected.


I refer you back up to WillG's post then to the post below:

Originally Posted by Josh Dial 

Actually, they don't ignore this.  In fact, Marty *specifically* mentions that there are two DeLoreans, and asks Doc why they can't just use that one to fix the other.  Doc replies that if they mess around with the care even slightly, they risk damaging it, which would be very bad.


They couldn't have taken the car from the cave because then it wouldn't have been there for Marty to use in 1955.  What exactly would happen to Marty had they taken it I don't know.  Would Marty disappear?  Would he just disappear from 1855?  Who knows, but Doc is right.  I wouldn't want to find out.



#16 of 45 OFFLINE   WillG

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Posted October 29 2010 - 03:03 AM


  And BTW I believe the novelization of BTTF3 mentions that Doc drained the gas out of the car in the cave.

 Does it mention what Doc actually did with the fuel. Seems it would have been foolish for him to just dump it.


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#17 of 45 OFFLINE   Ronald Epstein

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Posted November 01 2010 - 10:22 AM

Here are some screen tests that they left off the Blu-ray....







PS:  Looks like NBC pulled these moments after I posted them.  I will keep

on the lookout for reuploads as this was hilarious!


PSS: The videos should be available to watch HERE.  Highly recommended!


 

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#18 of 45 OFFLINE   Dave Mack

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Posted November 01 2010 - 05:39 PM

http://www.doblu.com...art-iii-review/



#19 of 45 OFFLINE   ManW_TheUncool

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Posted November 01 2010 - 09:39 PM


Originally Posted by Dave Mack 

http://www.doblu.com...art-iii-review/


Ugh!  Just when I was starting to see it RAH's way and think maybe the set is not quite so bad... the screen caps at that site *ALL* look very lacking in detail even for the first movie and pretty much confirms the impression I got from other earlier screen caps, etc. Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image


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#20 of 45 OFFLINE   Xenia Stathakopoulou

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Posted November 01 2010 - 11:36 PM



Originally Posted by ManW_TheUncool 



Ugh!  Just when I was starting to see it RAH's way and think maybe the set is not quite so bad... the screen caps at that site *ALL* look very lacking in detail even for the first movie and pretty much confirms the impression I got from other earlier screen caps, etc. Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image


_Man_


Ive sampled parts of all 3 on blu ray, only part 3 has more dnr and e.e.. The others have very little. Part 1 looks the best , but thats just me.


At last my body is reunited with my soul which was always feminine.