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Pioneer vsx1020k meets Bose -Help~!


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#1 of 15 beaugeste49

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Posted October 18 2010 - 09:24 AM

I have a new Pioneer vsx1020-k reciever which allegedly automatically will calibrate the correct level for my speakers.  However, I have a bose subwoofer with two left and right front cube speakers (among others). The cube speakers are connected through the subwoofer.  The subwoofer is connected to the receiver.   When I try to have the Pioneer calibrate the left and right front speakers I get an error message.  When I speak to Pioneer they say they dont know anything about Bose speakers, that I should hook the front speaker directly to the receiver.  Bose says that wont work because the speakers are similar to bi-amp speakers (but not the same) and it wonr calibrate them correctly.  What can I do?


#2 of 15 Jason Charlton

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Posted October 18 2010 - 09:57 AM

You can't use the built-in calibration with your Bose system.  The Bose system doesn't work like "regular" speakers - the "Bass Module" (don't call it a subwoofer, because it in no way fits the definition of a subwoofer) does a lot of signal processing and proprietary Bose shenanigans to the signal before it's output to the front cubes.


There's nothing much you can do with the Bose system except calibrate "by ear" which is extremely inexact.


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#3 of 15 CB750

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Posted October 21 2010 - 04:22 AM

Another reason not to buy Bose.  I am surprised this problem has not been discussed before.  You might check out one of those sound calibration meters you can get at Radio Shack.



#4 of 15 Bags5440

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Posted November 10 2010 - 07:14 AM

Bose is just a name and the last speaker I would buy. If you like the sound of the cubes you will need to wire them directly to the receiver and pitch the sub thing if you really want to call it that and get a real sub.  I would get new speakers though. If you want don't want a surround and keep price in mind might a suggest the klipsch. And if you must get bose try the 301 bookself speakers.



#5 of 15 CB750

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Posted November 11 2010 - 09:53 AM

Mike,


Your are right a Bose Cube system is the last speaker that anyone should buy.  However,  even if one likes the sound of the cubes they must be hooked up through the bass module because the module proves electronic boost and equalization to make up for the inferior quality and small size of the cubes.   If you contact Bose they will tell you that the cubes should not be connected directly to a receiver. 


#6 of 15 fatherdano

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Posted December 28 2010 - 09:56 AM

Mike


i stumbled across this forum because i also have the bose acousticmass 10 series II speaker setup.


i recently purchased a pioneer vsx-1020-k avr


also a klipsch 350 subwoofer



it sound great with the passive subwoofer and the powered sub


i would like to eliminate the 'passive subwoofer' and connect the bose cubes directly to the reciever.

what is the problem with this?  I'mnot partial to bose but 12 years ago they seemed like the best thing going.


After spending a ton of $$$ on the tv, avr, sub   i'd like to get by as is.   It is possible to use the automatic calibration also-  mind did a fine job.



#7 of 15 CB750

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Posted December 28 2010 - 10:37 AM

While the Bose bass module is a passive sub their are propitiatory electronics in the module that equalize and provide  boost to make up for the poor quality of the drivers found in the cubes.   If you ask Bose they will tell you that you cannot by pass the bass module and connect the cubes directly to a receiver.  In addition since Bose won't release any of the specifications for their equipment you don't know the ohm rating of those cubes you could run the risk of damage to your receiver.


#8 of 15 fatherdano

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Posted December 28 2010 - 10:42 AM

so do you reccomend just running it as is?



#9 of 15 CB750

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Posted December 28 2010 - 11:31 AM

Yes, I would run it as is with your new Sub,  and may want to put a new set of speakers on your wish list.



#10 of 15 Jdj8306

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Posted January 01 2011 - 07:02 PM

I had acoustimass speakers and bass module installed in the ceiling when I built my house. I recently purchased a Pioneer VSX-1020-k. I went in the attic to see how things were wired and found that all five cubes and the module were wired separately and there was no power for the bass module. What to do.

#11 of 15 CB750

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Posted January 02 2011 - 06:37 AM

Perhaps I am confused but why on earth would someone install Bose cubes and a bass module in a ceiling.    If that bass module some how make it's way into your attic then you must get 120 AC to that location it or move it to another location.   Those Bose cubes must be wired to the bass module and cannot be connected directly to your pioneer receiver as they are only 2 ohm speakers they could blow the receiver.

My advise is rip the Bose out and sell them on Ebay and buy some real speakers.



#12 of 15 fatherdano

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Posted January 02 2011 - 10:23 PM

Series II didn't require a power source.  Series III although did.



#13 of 15 CB750

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Posted January 03 2011 - 04:00 AM

As far as I know all Bose Accoustimass systems have to have the bass module connected to a AC power source.   Although the bass speaker in the module is passive the module has an equlaizer and other electronics built in that boost and equalize the signal to make up for the poor quality and small size of the cubes,  This is the reason that the speakers have to be connected through the bass module.


http://www.google.co...9&os=tech-specs 



#14 of 15 tjohnusa

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Posted January 08 2011 - 04:56 PM

Bill I see you are definitly not a Bose fanboy...lol I have cubes and am using them as rear surrounds and find them fine for that. I believe they are 4ohm and not 2. They can be checked with a multimeter. When hooked directly to the receiver just make sure the setting is set to "small speaker" the receiver will set the crossover point to not send deep bass signals to the speakers. For a while i hade them as front mains with a Klipsch sub and was satisfied until I picked up a nice set of Klipsch KG1.5 at a local thrift store for $20...that was when they were relagated to rears. I then took the sub and used it in a bedroom setup



#15 of 15 CB750

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Posted January 09 2011 - 03:08 PM

Terry,


I am happy that you have used your Bose cubes without the Bass Module and you did not damage your receiver, as it is something I would have not risked.


How do you know that I am not a Bose fanboy,  I have as set of 901's Series II which I have owned since the 1970's which I still use for music listening and they are among the finest stereo speaker systems from that and any other era.

I became suspect of the Bose Cube systems when a friend purchased a 5.1 Accoustamass system after being impressed by that slick Bose Demo at a Factory Store.  When he got them home we both agreed that they didn't sound as good in his home as they did in the store.  In fact even though they were the latest in Bose speaker technology and a 5.1 system they were no were near the sound quality of my old set of 901's that are almost 40 years old.


As far as the not connecting the cubes direct to a third party receiver that is not my own opinion, but the recommendation given by the manager of a Bose factory store.  He told me that all Bose cube speakers should be connected only through the bass module.  Part of the direct and reflecting  technology of the 901's is Bose proprietary equalizer installed between the Pre and power amps  out that equalizer  speakers totally lack any bass and high frequency response.   That same type of equalizer technology was used by Bose in the cube systems and is found as part of the Bass Module.

I have no idea what the Ohm rating of the cube speakers are as Bose will not list them in their specifications.   But assuming they are 4 Ohms as you say, not all receivers on the market these days can handle 4 Ohms and you run the risk of damaging the receiver.


However, the biggest indictment of the Bose Cubes come from your own statement that you replaced them with a used set of speakers which you purchased for $20 at a thrift store.  I am happy that you like your Bose cubes and they have given you years of good service, but for someone who owns a good Bose product I am not impressed with the cube systems performance or  their totally inflated price.