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Looney Tunes Censored 11 comes to Warner Archive in 2011!


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#1 of 189 Nailwraps

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Posted October 10 2010 - 05:48 PM

2011 marks the year of the Censored 11 Looney Tunes cartoons as they finally come to the Warner Archive!:


http://www.toonzone....censored-eleven

I like to thank Golden Age Cartoon forums member SNES Chalmers for breaking the news!



#2 of 189 AndyMcKinney

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Posted October 11 2010 - 12:29 AM

As this is an "Archive" release, though, people needn't expect them to be up to the picture-quality standards of the Golden Collection. I'd be surprised if there's any remastering done to them.



#3 of 189 Mike*SC

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Posted October 11 2010 - 04:00 AM

I'll believe it when I see it.  Have you ever seen "Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs"?  To a modern audience, the racism is ugly and shocking.  Certainly, the film has historical value, but I can't imagine why Warner Bros. would want to expose themselves to the enormous outcry and condemnation that will result.  Sure, some animation buffs demand this, but it would not be a big seller.

I'm not saying I'd be protesting, because I certainly would not.  I'm just saying, I'd be surprised.



#4 of 189 The Obsolete Man

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Posted October 11 2010 - 04:31 AM



Originally Posted by AndyMcKinney 

As this is an "Archive" release, though, people needn't expect them to be up to the picture-quality standards of the Golden Collection. I'd be surprised if there's any remastering done to them.



Ah, but the shorts were recently remastered for a showing in Hollywood, so there's no reason to think they wouldn't use those elements for a DVD release.



#5 of 189 Corey3rd

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Posted October 11 2010 - 04:48 AM

you can already see these cartoons online so it's not like Warners isn't already open for outcry.


By offering them as an Archive set, they're not going to have to worry about some kid at Best Buy putting them in the children's section and a parent throwing them into the mini-van's DVD player. This is aimed at the collectors and animation fans wanting to see what was yanked off TV for nearly 50 years.


These are about as racist as Phantom Menace.

Originally Posted by Mike*SC 

I'll believe it when I see it.  Have you ever seen "Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs"?  To a modern audience, the racism is ugly and shocking.  Certainly, the film has historical value, but I can't imagine why Warner Bros. would want to expose themselves to the enormous outcry and condemnation that will result.  Sure, some animation buffs demand this, but it would not be a big seller.

I'm not saying I'd be protesting, because I certainly would not.  I'm just saying, I'd be surprised.




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#6 of 189 Mike*SC

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Posted October 11 2010 - 05:15 AM



Originally Posted by Corey3rd 

you can already see these cartoons online so it's not like Warners isn't already open for outcry.


By offering them as an Archive set, they're not going to have to worry about some kid at Best Buy putting them in the children's section and a parent throwing them into the mini-van's DVD player. This is aimed at the collectors and animation fans wanting to see what was yanked off TV for nearly 50 years.


These are about as racist as Phantom Menace.

The fact of their being online (which, naïvely, I hadn't realized) doesn't really change anything.  There's a distinction between what long-dead executives okayed seventy years ago and what current Warner Bros. execs hope to make a profit off today.  Everybody knows that WB did not upload those cartoons to YouTube and the like, and make no profit from it.  A DVD release is a different animal.


And yes, I agree with you that smart people understand this distinction, and can watch these films and understand the very real sociological and historical significance of them in an intelligent way.  But there will always be those who can't see the distinction between showing something and endorsing that thing, or simply choose to ignore that in order to exploit the situation.  And those people will be loud.  And whatever small profit is to be gained by WB putting out DVDs that appeal to a tiny group of aficionados (who, as you point out, can already see these cartoons online) will be outweighed by a PR headache WB would just as soon avoid.

Having said that, I've been wrong before, and may be again.  But this is my hunch.

Can't agree with your "Phantom Menace" comparison, by the way.  "Coal Black" features outrageous stereotypes of black people with enormous pink lips and gold teeth with dice on them, and a truck with a sign offering to kill "Japs" at no cost.  Yes, it was a different time, and film does not seem mean-spirited -- for something so shocking today, there seems to be little malice in the humor (well, the "Japs" joke notwithstanding).  Even so, where Jar-Jar may have clumsily stumbled into uncomfortable racial stereotyping (but let's keep in mind, he's not human), "Coal Black" dives in headfirst with overt and overtly insulting stereotyping.  There is a difference.



#7 of 189 Traveling Matt

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Posted October 11 2010 - 05:32 AM

Originally Posted by Mike*SC 

Certainly, the film has historical value, but I can't imagine why Warner Bros. would want to expose themselves to the enormous outcry and condemnation that will result.  Sure, some animation buffs demand this, but it would not be a big seller.


Warner claims the Censored 11 are their most in-demand titles, according to the linked article. I would expect them to move. The extended controversy surrounding the films for so many years no doubt contribute to their desirability. Placing them in the Archives is precisely how you avoid any mainstream outcry.


I will unfortunately pass on this release, as I do not support DVD-R, but hopefully the films have been properly remastered. Perhaps their popularity might warrant a pressed release in the future?



#8 of 189 TravisR

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Posted October 11 2010 - 05:35 AM

Originally Posted by Mike*SC 

And whatever small profit is to be gained by WB putting out DVDs that appeal to a tiny group of aficionados (who, as you point out, can already see these cartoons online) will be outweighed by a PR headache WB would just as soon avoid.  



I think that since it's going to be MOD, very few people outside of folks who go to message boards like this are even going to know that they're available. Plus, WB will have disclaimers all over the disc and package talking about context and history to cover their ass. I think the fact that these cartoons have been out of circulation so long (despite their availability online) will make them a big seller to collectors, people curious to see how 'bad' they are and to people who are just racist creeps.



#9 of 189 Corey3rd

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Posted October 11 2010 - 07:23 AM



Originally Posted by Mike*SC Can't agree with your "Phantom Menace" comparison, by the way.  "Coal Black" features outrageous stereotypes of black people with enormous pink lips and gold teeth with dice on them, and a truck with a sign offering to kill "Japs" at no cost.  Yes, it was a different time, and film does not seem mean-spirited -- for something so shocking today, there seems to be little malice in the humor (well, the "Japs" joke notwithstanding).  Even so, where Jar-Jar may have clumsily stumbled into uncomfortable racial stereotyping (but let's keep in mind, he's not human), "Coal Black" dives in headfirst with overt and overtly insulting stereotyping.  There is a difference.


Jar-Jar Binks and his kind are nothing more than major black stereotypes. not to mention the big nose jew stereotype for that creature that owns Darth Vader baby. not to mention the extreme Asian stereotypes of those guys at the start of the film.


Fox put out the Charlie Chan and Mr. Moto movies without groups of people marching into SoCal with torches and pitchfork. Warners didn't have to apologize for putting out Tarzan. And Warners did release the black gags used in Tom and Jerry. did you write a nasty note to Warners wanting the blackface scenes removed from the Jazz Singer box?


The people that hate Warner Brothers for making these films - are going to hate them even if they never release them. Coal Black is over the top, but it's also the finest work from Bob Clampett's crew. It is ranked among the top 50 shorts of all time. This release is aimed at adults - not to be a little kid babysitter.


Far as quality goes Coal Black and 7 others of the Censored 11 were restored and shown a few years ago at the TCM Film Festival. They won't be a bunch of scratched up 16mm prints transferred.


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#10 of 189 TravisR

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Posted October 11 2010 - 07:56 AM

Originally Posted by Corey3rd 

Jar-Jar Binks and his kind are nothing more than major black stereotypes. not to mention the big nose jew stereotype for that creature that owns Darth Vader baby. not to mention the extreme Asian stereotypes of those guys at the start of the film.



That's your interpretation of those characters but you have absolutely no way to say that that's what George Lucas intended. In the case of these cartoons, there's no interpretation- the people behind it were obviously using stereotypes to mock blacks and Asians.


By the way, George Lucas gave $1 million to build a Martin Luther King, Jr. memorial so if he's a bigot, he's not very good at it.



#11 of 189 dana martin

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Posted October 11 2010 - 08:03 AM



Originally Posted by Corey3rd 



And Warners did release the black gags used in Tom and Jerry.


The people that hate Warner Brothers for making these films - are going to hate them even if they never release them. Coal Black is over the top, but it's also the finest work from Bob Clampett's crew. It is ranked among the top 50 shorts of all time. This release is aimed at adults - not to be a little kid babysitter.


Far as quality goes Coal Black and 7 others of the Censored 11 were restored and shown a few years ago at the TCM Film Festival. They won't be a bunch of scratched up 16mm prints transferred.



Where, where were all the original Hanna Barbara Tom & Jerry's released in that format, Volume Three had 3 such omisions, even after warnings as soon as the dvd starts up. And to make a statement, not everyone who wants to see this is a Racist Creep, some are just truly animation fans, while the subject matter would not fly in todays modern standards, i have no problem with the Japan bashing in these, because they are approiate for the time in which they were made, wrong but right for the time and what they were trying to convey, no different than the SNAFU shorts; funny no one ever gets upset about making fun of Germans in the cartoons of that era, why is that? Its part of our history, WWII is part of our history, just like Japan bombing Pearl Harbor, so that war as all of them are was fought with propaganda, we as a country have done that for over two hundred years, and will continue do so. For those of you who have never served, i could not explain it, for those of you that have i dont need to.


But i would like an offical release not a mod


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#12 of 189 TravisR

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Posted October 11 2010 - 08:08 AM

Originally Posted by dana martin 

And to make a statement, not everyone who wants to see this is a Racist Creep, some are just truly animation fans...



And that's what I said. Or rather I classified animation fans as "collectors" but I'm not in any way, shape or form saying that everyone who wants to buy these is racist.



#13 of 189 dana martin

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Posted October 11 2010 - 08:18 AM

have you ever seen any of the george pal puppet toons, while not right in presentation, they are a sight to behold, pre-dating the ranking bass productions, there is a time that the art of the situation needs to be viewed seperatly from some of the subject matter, and see the craft of the art, the timing of the gags.

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#14 of 189 TravisR

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Posted October 11 2010 - 08:25 AM

Originally Posted by dana martin 

have you ever seen any of the george pal puppet toons, while not right in presentation, they are a sight to behold, pre-dating the ranking bass productions, there is a time that the art of the situation needs to be viewed seperatly from some of the subject matter, and see the craft of the art, the timing of the gags.


I've never seen the George Pal puppet cartoons but I think it's fair to say that I agree with the bulk of your statement. I thought it was clear from my previous posts but I'm definitely not saying that these cartoons shouldn't be released. I've seen all of the censored 11 over the years and they're offensive to me but just because I feel that doesn't mean that they shouldn't be released or that society should try to bury its past.



#15 of 189 Corey3rd

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Posted October 11 2010 - 08:59 AM



Originally Posted by TravisR 



That's your interpretation of those characters but you have absolutely no way to say that that's what George Lucas intended. In the case of these cartoons, there's no interpretation- the people behind it were obviously using stereotypes to mock blacks and Asians.


By the way, George Lucas gave $1 million to build a Martin Luther King, Jr. memorial so if he's a bigot, he's not very good at it.



and there's no interpretation needed to see Jar-Jar Binks and his ilk are black stereotypes. So he gave million bucks to build an MLK memorial - that doesn't remove the stain of Jar-Jar Binks as the bumbling black character who eventually puts the Emperor in power through his stupidity.


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#16 of 189 jquirk

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Posted October 11 2010 - 09:08 AM

Jar-Jar Binks "a bumbling black character?" He did not look like a black person to me. He looked like a being the like I've never seen before. I do not see how somebody could construe that Jar-Jar is supposed to be black. That is ridiculous.



#17 of 189 Corey3rd

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Posted October 11 2010 - 09:24 AM



Originally Posted by jquirk 

Jar-Jar Binks "a bumbling black character?" He did not look like a black person to me. He looked like a being the like I've never seen before. I do not see how somebody could construe that Jar-Jar is supposed to be black. That is ridiculous.



cause Jar-Jar resembles Ahmed Best, the actor who played him. He's black.


Lucas based his Star Wars films after the low budget serials that he saw on TV - those films were notorious for their stereotypes of blacks and asians with bad dialogue.


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#18 of 189 TravisR

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Posted October 11 2010 - 10:05 AM

This silly discussion belongs in one of the many Star Wars threads in the Movie section.



#19 of 189 Mark B

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Posted October 11 2010 - 11:37 AM



Originally Posted by TravisR 

This silly discussion belongs in one of the many Star Wars threads in the Movie section.

I agree. I am here to read about the Censored 11. There's enough Star Wars debates on the net to last a lifetime.



#20 of 189 Corey3rd

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Posted October 11 2010 - 12:02 PM


The Censored 11 belong in the movie section since they weren't made for TV and haven't aired on TV in over four decades.

Originally Posted by Mark B 



I agree. I am here to read about the Censored 11. There's enough Star Wars debates on the net to last a lifetime.




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