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Hitachi Convergance Repair


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14 replies to this topic

#1 of 15 mike_p_t

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Posted April 19 2010 - 01:31 PM

Hello all,

This weekend, my 8 year old Hitachi 53" rear projection TV developed an issue where everything looks weired (like 3D with no glasses) and things on the TV are duplicated.  It also has many red swoosh lines running across the top of the screen.

From the research I have done, this appears to be a convergance issue.  There is also a kit that can be purchased for $69 for the repair.  The site says it is simple and anyone can do it and they give you step by step instrucions.  Should I even bother or should I chuck it and get a new one?  Is this really a simple repair?  I have done a "little" soldering before.

Thanks in advance.

#2 of 15 Steve Berger

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Posted April 20 2010 - 12:45 AM

The "level of difficulty" depends on the specific model. (??)
There were some model versions that did not use the ICs due to a worldwide (Sanyo) parts shortage.
Removing (unsoldering) the old chips is probably harder than the soldering.
Your TV is only about half way through it's normal lifespan.
Repaired, it will outlast anything purchased new today by several years.
There are improved versions of the replacement ICs so a kit with original #s would be a bad idea.
Sometimes current limiting yoke resistor will burn. (probably part of the "kit".
A small service shop may charge about $200 for a complete repair.


#3 of 15 mike_p_t

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Posted April 20 2010 - 02:03 AM

Thanks Steve.

My model is 53uwx10ba. One place that sells the kit is tvrepairkits.com

Would this be an ok place to purchase it from?  Does a sponsor here sell the kit as well?

I have done a little soldering in the past. Is desoldering where you heat up the old solder and use one of those suction things so suck it up?



#4 of 15 Steve Berger

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Posted April 20 2010 - 03:11 PM

RE: Desoldering. Yes that's the process of removing old solder. You must be careful not to damage the copper traces around the leads.

RE: Kit. The official Hitachi kit # is X480293. It includes all of the possible yoke resistors and two STK394-160E integrated circuits, the latest substitutes. STK392-150's are also an acceptable substitute.
You should not use the original STK392-110 or 120s. The kit from the source you listed does not specify which ICs it uses. There is no such thing as a "Convergence Rated Resistor". They are correctly called "Metal Film Resistors". You don't want to use a resistor that would add "inductance" to the circuit like a "wire wound" resistor would.

A real parts distributor should have the actual Hitachi kit. (Encompass parts, Fox international, Joseph Electronics, Fulton Radio for examples) I believe they will sell to individuals at a retail price. (I get a net price as a "reseller" with a business account) The individual parts would be available from additional suppliers like MCM Electronics, Mat Electronics, Parts Express.

This model appears to have an easily removable convergence board. (3 screws and a few connectors)


#5 of 15 mike_p_t

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Posted April 20 2010 - 04:20 PM

Steve,

I am assuming a kit purchased from one of the companies you list would not have instructions for replacement, correct?  I probably could not do it without instructions.

What would you do if you were me?  Should I even bother?  I was contemplating the purchase of a Mitsubishi 60" DLP for $1099 shipped with a stand from compusa.com.  I have a bluray player, but my TV has no HDMI inputs. 

I have been doing some research on here concerning DLP's and I know some of the pros and cons.  That is where I am leaning now.

Would my current TV be worth anything to a repair shop to use for parts?

desicions...decisions 

Thank you very much for your time.

#6 of 15 Steve Berger

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Posted April 20 2010 - 04:51 PM

The repair is relatively simple on the model you have. I would remove the back and look at the convergence board to see what you are getting into. Viewing from the back, the convergence board is on the right hand side. The two ICs are mounted on large heat sinks with 2 screws. The kits come with a collection of resistors and a list of which values go with each silk-screened number. Bad ones can almost always be determined by inspection - discolored or burned. There are, I believe three screws, 4 or 5 lift-up connectors and about 5  or 6 plug in connectors and the board comes out for easy work upon a table.

Here is a good reference site.
http://www.hometheatershack.com/forums/diy-repair-maintenance/5600-crt-based-rptv-convergence-repairs.html

I fear that the kit you located is a knock-off of the official kit, at a higher price, with the original, rather than the improved parts. As I understand it, Sanyo no longer makes any of the ICs themselves, they all come from licensees. Any truly "original" Sanyo IC is probably old stock of the inferior type number. (because the legitimate parts distributors wouldn't be selling many of them since the real servicers ordering them would know about the improved parts available)

You could probably buy just the ICs and any needed resistors for half the cost of that kit.

Repaired, the set would probably outlast any set purchased today.

Note: TriTronics was purchased by Vance Baldwin and goes under the Encompass name now. (as mentioned in the website I referenced)



#7 of 15 mike_p_t

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Posted April 22 2010 - 02:27 PM

Steve,

Is the board I am looking at on the upper right hand or flat on the bottom of the TV?



#8 of 15 Steve Berger

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Posted April 22 2010 - 04:06 PM

Flat on the bottom, on the right hand side.
The big aluminum heat sinks are a giveaway.
Those things that look like jumpers between boards lift up to release.


#9 of 15 David Willow

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Posted April 23 2010 - 01:15 PM

 Mike,

I replaced the convergence ICs on my Hitachi a few years ago. It was not too difficult, but it helps to have an idea how to solder before you start.  If you've never done it, practice on something that doesn't cost so much first. The total repair cost less than $40.  Unfortunately it developed another problem this year and I decided to get it out of the house.

When it first happened, I decided to get a new TV first (what a great excuse  ).  Then I fixed the old one.  Even if I couldn't fix it, I already had the new one.


#10 of 15 mike_p_t

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Posted April 23 2010 - 04:31 PM

I am still going back and fourth.  Did you have to do any adjustments after you fixed it?

I have been kind of itching for a new set, if you know what I mean.  I have a blue ray player, but this TV does not have HDMI.

What did you do with your set once you got rid of it?

#11 of 15 mike_p_t

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Posted April 23 2010 - 04:35 PM

Steve,

You mentioned parts express earlier. They are actually only about 7 mile from me.  I have been there several times.
What would I ask for if I went there?  I searched their site for the IC's, but nothing came up.

#12 of 15 David Willow

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Posted April 23 2010 - 11:57 PM

 Search for STK392-150 (you will need 2).  I got my from MCM Electronics.

I offered mine for free on my local HD mailing list (YAHOO group).  No one was interested, so I put it out for the garbage folks. 

This is a GREAT excuse to get a new TV.  

No adjustments in my case.  I just recalibrated.  YMMV.


#13 of 15 Steve Berger

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Posted April 24 2010 - 01:06 AM

Usually all you have to do is hit the "Magic Focus" button - after you do the repair.
Don't hit the button too much before since you could corrupt the data and then a full convergence could be needed.

Look for any burned resistors: I can get you the values from the "RKxxx" silk screenings. The resistors are there to protect the yokes from shorting ICs. MCM is a very reliable vendor for individual parts but they won't have any appropriate "kits".

Repaired there are options for the set. Sale or even donation (with resulting tax credit if from a legitimate charity) to day care, child care, nursing home, retirement centers, hospital family housing, womens' shelters. Keep it around for when your new set goes titsup in 4 or 5 years. I personally would avoid Sally's Army or Goodwill since all they want is the money they can get for selling it.


#14 of 15 mike_p_t

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Posted April 24 2010 - 04:06 AM

Steve,

I was just wondering why the current I have is so much better quality wise?  Were they just made better?

Also, am I not missing a lot with 1080i component vs 1080p HDMI?

#15 of 15 Steve Berger

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Posted April 24 2010 - 09:06 AM

It's not really a quality issue per se. The components, solder, and manufacturing methods imposed upon manufacturers have known limitations, creating unrepairable circuit boards. Since no one builds new boards for old sets, once they run out the set becomes unrepairable. The known limitations start to destroy the circuit boards at about the 5 year point.

Your set is composed of mostly repairable circuit boards that weren't built the way new ones are. There are a couple of unrepairable boards in your set but not all of them, like new sets. (and they only contain some of the deadly factors)

Differences between 1080i and 1080p depend a lot on viewing distance. There are some on-line charts and graphs that demonstrate where you will see or not see differences. The difference between analog and digital is far more noticeable that the simple resolution changes, mostly in the color.

When looking for a new, large TV, I would focus on the color reproduction rather than resolution. Since the majority of programming is not true HD, it takes good video processing to make the color look correct. Anything upscaled from SD, recorded in SD for later broadcast in HD, un-remastered TV shows or movies, 4:3 TV shows, taped or DVR'd TV, standard DVDs, etc need advanced video processing to look right even if the cable box, DVD/BluRay, Satellite receiver upconverts them to 720/1080i/1080p.