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HTF BLU-RAY REVIEW: Goodfellas: 20th Anniversary Edition



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#1 of 36 Cameron Yee

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Posted February 09 2010 - 02:45 PM

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Goodfellas: 20th Anniversary Edition

Release Date: February 16, 2010
Studio: Warner Brothers
Packaging/Materials: Two-disc Warner Digi-book
Year: 1990
Rating: R
Running Time: 2:25:00
MSRP: $34.99

  THE FEATURE SPECIAL FEATURES
Video 1080p high definition 16x9 1.85:1 480i or 480p standard definition
Audio Dolby Digital: English 5.1, French 5.1, Spanish 5.1 Stereo and mono
Subtitles English SDH, French, Spanish None

The Feature: 4.5/5

Henry Hill (Ray Liotta) never wanted to be anything but a gangster. Growing up in a working class family in 1950s Brooklyn, being part of the mob is his chance to be a somebody in a neighborhood of nobodies. Though he starts out modestly as an errand boy for the local mob boss Paul Cicero (Paul Sorvino), his enthusiasm and dedication to the work garner him increasing levels of responsibility. By the time he's barely past his 20s, he and his friends Tommy DeVito (Joe Pesci) and Jimmy Conway (Robert DeNiro) have hatched a major score, the success of which turns Henry into a major player. Though he lives the good life for awhile, marrying his girlfriend Karen (Lorraine Bracco), building a family and keeping the requisite mistress on the side, eventually getting and having everything he wanted will be his undoing. Henry may have actually become somebody thanks to the mob, but the mob can just as easily make him into a nobody.

Adapted from Nicholas Pileggi's book "Wiseguy," "Goodfellas" has proved to be both the quintessential Martin Scorsese and mafia crime film. Though some might hesitate to call it a classic given its relative youth, frankly I'm surprised it's only 20-years old, feeling very much a part of the times it depicts than the period piece it actually is. This speaks to the film's attention to detail on all levels, from production design to hair and makeup, the only indicators of its more recent inception being the trademark Thelma Schoonmaker and Scorsese editing flourishes. And though the rise-and-fall of a gangster story is a familiar one, there's hardly a moment when we're not riveted by what will unfold during Henry's path to self-destruction. Twenty years on and the film continues to receive critical praise and acknowledgment from the filmmaking community. To me that certainly qualifies it as a classic.

Video Quality: 3.5/5

With the feature and feature-relevant extras contained on a single layer Blu-ray disc, I suspect this 20th Anniversary Edition disc is simply a repackaging of the high definition release that came out on both Blu-ray and HD-DVD in 2007.

Presented in 1080p with the VC-1 codec, the film's image fills the entirety of my 16:9 display despite the package labeling it as 1.85:1. Black levels are sometimes limited, giving the image a noticeably flat quality, usually in dimly lit interior scenes. Contrast consequently doesn't always exhibit the full range of values, though it may ultimately come down to the quality of the source than the transfer. Detail is decent, but a mild veneer of noise tends to get in the way of anything truly breathtaking. Close-ups tend to be more satisfying in that respect, but there's still a visible loss of detail in the wide shots. Colors are generally muted in quality, with flesh tones sometimes looking a little pink, but overall they seem sufficiently deep and stable. Edge halos are visible in many of the exterior scenes, making the image excessively sharp and processed. Overall it's an average transfer for a film that certainly deserves better.

Audio Quality: 3/5

Lacking a lossless audio option will likely be insult to injury for many. It is unfortunate given the supposed "anniversary" nature of the release, but the 640 kbps Dolby Digital 5.1 track does a decent job with what's a pretty straightforward mix. Though the film's voice over narrative is firmly anchored to the center channel, the rest of the soundtrack has a noticeably wider staging, the surrounds kicking in for mostly large environmental effects (city streets, prison visitation rooms, etc.). LFE is technically absent, but bass activity shows sufficient depth, the weakness seeming more a product of the period of filmmaking than the capabilities of the audio format, lossy though it may be. Overall it's a decent, if somewhat unremarkable presentation.

Special Features: 3.5/5

The special features include all the items from the 2004 "Goodfellas" special edition DVD and a second disc repackaged from a 2008 Warner Brothers DVD collection. Though the latter is a nice thought, it feels like a half-hearted attempt to legitimize the "anniversary" label on the release.

Special features content evaluation by Herb Kane from his review of the Martin Scorsese DVD Collection and Ken McAlinden from his review of the Warner Brothers Gangsters Collection Volume 4.

The Cast and Crew Commentary with Martin Scorsese, Ray Liotta, Lorraine Bracco, Paul Sorvino, Frank Vincent, Co-Screenwriter Nicholas Pileggi, Producers Irwin Winkler and Barbara De Fina, Cinematographer Michael Ballhaus, and Editor Thelma Schoomaker: The scene-specific commentary is chock full of interesting information about the film, from concept to finished product.

The Cop and Crook Commentary with Henry Hill and FBI Agent Edward McDonald: While it's interesting hearing ex-mobster Hill's comments as they relate to him, it seems wrong listening to this low life as his actions are somewhat glorified from what were true-to-life events. McDonald's participation is somewhat more subdued and at times he takes an almost satirical attitude toward Hill.

Getting Made (29:35, SD) An in-depth look at how the whole project came to be, from Scorsese contacting author Nicholas Pileggi to the completion of the project. This is a super little feature.

The Workaday Gangster (7:57, SD) Henry Hill takes the lead discussing what it was like living the life of a mobster. Other cast members appear and offer their thoughts of what it was like portraying some of the thugs.

The Goodfellas Legacy (13:32, SD) Discussion with a number of budding young directors as well as some established directors and how the film affected their filmmaking.

Paper Is Cheaper Than Film (4:28, SD): Shows us some of Scorsese's notes and sketches as they compare to several completed scenes.

Theatrical Trailer (1:28, SD)

Collectible Book: The nicely produced book-that-is-the-packaging includes cast and crew biographies and numerous archival photographs.

[Disc Two]

Public Enemies: The Golden Age of the Gangster Film (1:45:49, SD): The core of the documentary consists of a number of interviews with an international collection of film scholars, including many of the participants in the commentaries on this set, and filmmakers attuned to the genre such as Martin Scorsese and Nicholas Pileggi. The interviews are complemented by archival first person accounts from important filmmakers in the genre such as directors Mervyn LeRoy and Raoul Walsh and actress Joan Leslie. Generous amounts of clips and behind-the-scenes photos are used to illustrate the films being discussed. Off-screen narration is provided by Alec Baldwin.

The documentary offers a fine history of the genre as well as a broader look at the history of crime on film. This is quite a range of years when one considers it begins with the first substantial narrative feature, 1903's "The Great Train Robbery." Following the genre somewhat chronologically, the piece looks at significant silent films and spends quite a bit of time on the breakthrough "pre-code" talkies "Little Caesar," "The Public Enemy," and "Scarface." Other topics include adaptations to the genre, which addressed both its fundamental limitations and the enforcement of the Production Code that began in 1934. Adaptations included the casting of gangster stars as agents of the law in films like "G-Men," infusing the gangsters with consciences and forcing them to confront even worse gangsters (enter Humphrey Bogart as Warner Brothers' go-to "worse-guy"), and genre-bending twists like gangster comedies. Eventually, the documentary discusses the influence of the Golden Age gangster films on subsequent features, ranging from post-war noirs to modern-day crime films like "Goodfellas," "Once Upon a Time in America," and "The Departed." Interestingly, no mention is made of "The Godfather" and its sequels (Paramount generally resists having those films lumped in with other "gangster" pictures as if the genre were some kind of pejorative). If anything, the documentary makes a pretty good case that the genre is flexible enough to encompass everything from low comedies, to hard-boiled action programmers, to Oscar-worthy epic family dramas like Coppola's films. Along the way, the film also offers biographical and professional notes on significant personalities both in front of and behind the camera.

Merry Melodies and Looney Tunes

  • I Like Mountain Music (6:56, SD) - A 1933 Harman-Ising Merrie Melodies cartoon following what would become a familiar "magazine covers come to life" plot. There is very little gangster related material until close to the end, where an Edward G. Robinson caricature appears out of the pages of a Hollywood magazine to thwart the efforts of a group of criminals who previously emerged from a true crime magazine.
  • She Was an Acrobat's Daughter (8:35, SD) - A Friz Freleng Technicolor Merrie Melodies cartoon from 1937 that parodies a night out at the movies, lampooning both audience members and theatrical conventions. The gangster connection in this one comes late in the short when the feature presentation proves to be "The Petrified Florist" which spoofs "The Petrified Forest" complete with caricatures of Leslie Howard and Bette Davis.
  • Racketeer Rabbit (7:52, SD) - A Friz Freleng Technicolor Looney Tunes cartoon from 1946 in which Bugs Bunny matches wits with a couple of criminals who bear a striking resemblance to Edward G. Robinson and Peter Lorre.
  • Bugs and Thugs (7:12, SD) - A Friz Freleng Technicolor Looney Tunes cartoon from 1954 that pits bugs against diminutive bankrobber Bugsy and his large oafish sidekick Mugsy. A couple of gags are repeated from "Racketeer Rabbit," but they are improved upon as well. This is one of my all time favorite Freleng cartoons.

Recap

The Feature: 4.5/5
Video Quality: 3.5/5
Audio Quality: 3/5
Special Features: 3.5/5
Overall Score (not an average): 3/5


Warner Brothers turns in a serviceable audio and video presentation for a classic and quintessential Scorsese / mafia film. While the feature-relevant set of extras has some strong points, the second disc feels like a last-minute attempt to pump up the amount of "stuff" in the release. In all respects the film deserves better; as a result I can't recommend this 20th anniversary edition. If you must have the film in your collection, opt for the single-disc Blu-ray release, which is available at half the price.
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#2 of 36 Robert Crawford

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Posted February 09 2010 - 09:09 PM

Warner should be embarassed by this so-called special release.  I am very disappointed in them for this release and can only hope that a 25th Anniversary release will be done right.





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#3 of 36 TravisR

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Posted February 10 2010 - 01:01 AM

I'm happy I picked the first release for $8 so I don't have to waste an extra $10 or $15 on this one.

#4 of 36 Brandon Conway

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Posted February 10 2010 - 07:31 AM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Crawford 

Warner should be embarassed by this so-called special release.  I am very disappointed in them for this release and can only hope that a 25th Anniversary release will be done right.
Why, exactly? Is their marketing department forcing you to buy it? Repackages of prior releases is a marketing staple of the DVD/BD industry. I fail to so the sore offense.


"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#5 of 36 Mike Frezon

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Posted February 10 2010 - 07:33 AM

Count me among the disappointed that there is no release with a lossless audio track. 

There's Jessie the yodeling cowgirl. Bullseye, he's Woody's horse. Pete the old prospector. And, Woody, the man himself.Of course, it's time for Woody's RoundUp. He's the very best! He's the rootinest, tootinest cowboy in the wild, wild west!


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#6 of 36 Brandon Conway

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Posted February 10 2010 - 07:40 AM

It's amazing to me that in 3.5 years this transfer/disc has gone from a "presented perfectly in High Definition by Warner Home Video" recommendation from Mr. Harris ( http://www.hometheat...high-definition ) to a 3.5 video rating.

I can understand the complaints about no lossless audio (though I know exactly why, financially, Warner wouldn't bother with this film again for at least another 5 years), but has the bar for video quality really been raised that much? Astounding (and in a good way).

"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#7 of 36 Robert Crawford

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Posted February 10 2010 - 11:06 AM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Conway 



Why, exactly? Is their marketing department forcing you to buy it? Repackages of prior releases is a marketing staple of the DVD/BD industry. I fail to so the sore offense.
 
If you're going to ask me such questions then why are you answering them?




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#8 of 36 Brandon Conway

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Posted February 10 2010 - 03:43 PM

So, they should be ashamed for doing what has been common practice for 25 years in home video. Not sure I follow you, but ok.

"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#9 of 36 Robert Crawford

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Posted February 10 2010 - 04:14 PM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Conway 

So, they should be ashamed for doing what has been common practice for 25 years in home video. Not sure I follow you, but ok.
 
Frankly, I don't care if you follow me or not.





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#10 of 36 Dave H

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Posted February 10 2010 - 05:46 PM




Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Conway 



Why, exactly? Is their marketing department forcing you to buy it? Repackages of prior releases is a marketing staple of the DVD/BD industry. I fail to so the sore offense.
 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Conway 

So, they should be ashamed for doing what has been common practice for 25 years in home video. Not sure I follow you, but ok.
Come on, Brandon.  This is the exact same disc and encode of the first disc which is mediocre for today's standards and compared to other titles I've watched from its era.  There's a number of compression artifacts (read: non-film grain) throughout the film and at minimal, a new, better encode should have been done.  Goodfellas is one of the greatest movies ever made and deserved MUCH better effort.  This release is a joke and adding Looney Tunes isn't going to make up for it. 


#11 of 36 Brandon Conway

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Posted February 10 2010 - 08:53 PM

I'm sure Warner would love your several hundred thousand dollar donation to make a new transfer possible so that maybe 100 people can stop stressing about a disc that by 2006 standards was "presented perfectly".

The home theater enthusiast has become decidedly overly spoiled, IMO, and I'll leave it at that.

"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#12 of 36 Robert Crawford

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Posted February 10 2010 - 09:01 PM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Conway View Post


The home theater enthusiast has become decidedly overly spoiled, IMO, and I'll leave it at that.
Please do, leave it at that.

By the way, without the supposedly spoiled HT enthusiast, where would the studios PQ be today?





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#13 of 36 Brandon Conway

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Posted February 11 2010 - 08:25 AM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Crawford 




Please do, leave it at that.

By the way, without the supposedly spoiled HT enthusiast, where would the studios PQ be today?


Crawdaddy
Rhetorical or not, asking a question makes "leaving it at that" difficult.

Encouraging improvement is one thing; expecting a new transfer to modern standards every 2-3 years is overkill. On blu-ray.com the current focus of complaints is the 2 year old transfer of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Do we want everything to be the best it can be? Sure. Should we expect Warner to spend the money on new transfers for the same 10 films every 18-36 months? Seems excessive to me. There's way too many other films to bring to the format the first time. If there's a significant quality issue (Fifth Element, Gangs of New York), a redo is worthwhile. Otherwise it seems to me to be an unreasonable, and frankly unrealistic expectation. I simply don't find the concept of being reasonable as objectionable an offense as it apparently is lately in the home theater enthusiast community.

"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#14 of 36 Robert Crawford

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Posted February 11 2010 - 09:44 AM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Conway 




Rhetorical or not, asking a question makes "leaving it at that" difficult.

Encouraging improvement is one thing; expecting a new transfer to modern standards every 2-3 years is overkill. On blu-ray.com the current focus of complaints is the 2 year old transfer of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Do we want everything to be the best it can be? Sure. Should we expect Warner to spend the money on new transfers for the same 10 films every 18-36 months? Seems excessive to me. There's way too many other films to bring to the format the first time. If there's a significant quality issue (Fifth Element, Gangs of New York), a redo is worthwhile. Otherwise it seems to me to be an unreasonable, and frankly unrealistic expectation. I simply don't find the concept of being reasonable as objectionable an offense as it apparently is lately in the home theater enthusiast community.
 
Brandon,

I've hijacked this review thread enough so I'll let you have the last word.





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#15 of 36 Cameron Yee

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Posted February 11 2010 - 03:16 PM

How's about some Movie Haiku?

Henry joins the mobTo become a somebodyAmong nobodies

---

You said I'm funnyLike a clown? I amuse you?Tell me what's funny!

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#16 of 36 cafink

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Posted February 11 2010 - 05:05 PM

 As Brandon said, Robert Harris called this release "perfect" just four years ago.  Now, Cameron gives it a 3.5/5 for video quality.  Is that because of an increase in expectations during the intervening years, or is it just a matter of differing opinions?  It's not like limited contrast, noise, muted colors, and edge enhancement--the video issues that Cameron identifies--were unknown phenomena in 2006.


 

 


#17 of 36 Cameron Yee

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Posted February 11 2010 - 05:21 PM

I don't think it's one or the other, but I do think it is predominantly a difference in opinion. The only definitive answer about "diminishing returns" would be for RH to revisit the release, since I didn't review it in 2006 and only owned the DVD release up until reviewing this latest edition.




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#18 of 36 Colin Jacobson

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Posted February 12 2010 - 02:50 AM

I can't find RAH's old review - stinkin' search engine!  Does he say that the transfer is perfect or the mastering?  The print itself suffers from some flaws, so while that one could argue the mastering is great, it's still gonna have problems...

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#19 of 36 TravisR

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Posted February 12 2010 - 03:12 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colin Jacobson View Post

I can't find RAH's old review
Here you go:

http://www.hometheat...high-definition

#20 of 36 cafink

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Posted February 12 2010 - 03:14 AM

Brandon linked to the review in his earlier post.  Mr. Harris doesn't go into specifics, but he describes the film as being "presented perfectly in High Definition."
 

 






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