Jump to content



Sign up for a free account!

Signing up for an account is fast and free. As a member you can join in the conversation, enter contests to win things like this Logitech Harmony Ultimate Remote and you won't get the popup ads that guests get. Click here to create your free account.

Photo
- - - - -

Optimal frequency range for Fronts and Center?


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 of 2 johnnyutah

johnnyutah

    Extra

  • 19 posts
  • Join Date: Sep 28 2009

Posted February 03 2010 - 08:54 AM

Hi all,

I'm looking into purchasing a audio system for my HT.  It is for movies and sports primarily and some tv.  No gaming and not really music except for concerts on dvd and such.  My room is 20'x12' with 7'2" ceilings.  carpeted floor and the TV on the long wall.

I'm doing a 5.1 system and can only wall mount the speakers so i can't buy bookshelf or towers.  I have a limited budget, and am trying to figure out if there is a specific frequency range to look for or that is considered "optimal" for the fronts, center and surrounds.

I'm looking into the Def tech 600, Energy Classic Take 5, an onkyo set up and the Klipsch Quintett III.  The Def tech in Magnolia sounded like they are lacking depth to them and not sure if its the system or their frequency response.

here are their approximate specs for fronts and center:

Def Tech  55k-30k
Energy  110k - 20k
Onkyo   55k - 50k
Klipsch  120k-23k


As i understand it, the fronts and centers are the most important (especially center) as they carry the majority of dialogue and sound.  The normal freq range of the human voice is between 80k and 2-3k.  Should this steer me towards a freq response on the lower side for fronts and center?

plus with explosions, punches, kicks, etc..  don't i want my fronts and center to reproduce some of those lower freq's and not rely solely on the subwoofer?  I know you should go with what sounds good to you but i am just wondering if this matters a great deal...

Thanks so much for any advice or insight!!!!!!!






#2 of 2 SethH

SethH

    Screenwriter

  • 2,867 posts
  • Join Date: Dec 17 2003

Posted February 03 2010 - 10:29 AM

The key is that you really want to cross your sub over at around 80Hz to prevent localization of the sub.  So, ideally, you would want all your speakers to be flat well down below 80hz so you have a smooth crossover.  With that said . . .lots of people cross over to their sub at 100Hz or 110Hz or 120Hz and are perfectly fine with it.  If your sub is in the front of the room, or if you have two subs in the two front corners, localization becomes less of a concern anyway.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users