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7 replies to this topic

#1 of 8 bowbiker

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Posted January 22 2010 - 10:08 AM

Hey All,
My next question is that if i buy a new Plasma, LCD, LED, DLP or Projector do they just come with HDMI connections or multiple Connections? the reason I ask is because I have an older Yamaha receiver with component video, S video, digital optical connections on it.

Thanks again

#2 of 8 SethH

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Posted January 22 2010 - 10:25 AM

Any new display device should come with HDMI, and probably at least 3 of them.  The only exception should be some projectors (particularly on the lower-end or projectors geared toward business/powerpoint) which should still come with DVI.


#3 of 8 bowbiker

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Posted January 22 2010 - 11:26 AM

But do they have the other connections so that I can hook up old receiver????????????

#4 of 8 Michael Reuben

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Posted January 22 2010 - 11:58 AM



Quote:
Originally Posted by bowbiker 

But do they have the other connections so that I can hook up old receiver????????????

No one can answer that question in the abstract.

Pick a model you're interested in and look at the specifications. The chances are that it will have multiple types of inputs, but there are no guarantees.
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#5 of 8 Selden Ball

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Posted January 26 2010 - 07:42 AM

Browsing through the TVs on display in the local big-box stores (Best Buy, Sears, Target, Walmart, etc) I found TVs with varying numbers of all types of inputs: RF, composite, s-video, component and HDMI. I wound up getting a low-end Vizio with two HDMI inputs and one of each of the others. The only output it had was optical digital audio, which was annoying. For various reasons, I would have liked to have had the traditional yellow/red/white video and audio outputs, too.

Selden

#6 of 8 HomeTheaterJoe

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Posted January 26 2010 - 10:59 PM

You should find the optical video is going to be your best option for connection if your older equipment doesn't have HDMI connections. The typical Toslink (optical connections) should only cost you a few bucks. I have tried some of the more expensive ones and the difference is minimal for the cost.

As a guide you should only use RCA connectors as the last alternative when connecting equipment unless you have high quality screened leads already.


#7 of 8 Selden Ball

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Posted January 27 2010 - 02:44 AM

Joe,

Unfortunately, I think you made a typo. I don't know of any "optical video" connections (except for the one to the eye ;) ). Presumably you meant "optical audio".

I use stereo audio connections primarily for entertainment: I have an ancient spectrum analyzer with an led display which needs an analog connection. It's fun to watch its dancing lights and see what frequencies are used in various types of music and movie sound tracks.

Selden

#8 of 8 Joseph DeMartino

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Posted February 01 2010 - 12:31 PM

Optical audio cables send 1s and 0s down a piece of glass in the form of light pulses.  There is NO difference in sound quality between any two of them unless the fiber is broken or the ends are dirty.  And then you're either going to get drop outs or no sound at all, not continuous sound that is better in one case than another. 

RCA connectors are just that - connectors.  They have nothing to do with the quality of the connection.  What kind of input and output they are associated does make a difference.  Yellow 75 ohm video connections are inferior to s-video, which is inferior to component, which is pretty much equal to HDMI or DVI up to 1080i, but doesn't support HDCP and therefore won't upconvert to 1080p.  Analog red/white audio connections are inferior to digital connections.  But coaxial digital cables use - you guessed it - RCA connectors.  And since they are also sending 1s and 0s, they "sound" exactly the same as optical digital cables when connecting the same equipment.  (I tend to prefer coax because they are less fragile than optical, which can snap if bend to far or crimped.)

Regards,

Joe





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