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HTF Blu-ray Review: MAGNOLIA



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#1 of 20 Michael Reuben

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Posted January 18 2010 - 11:56 AM

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Magnolia (Blu-ray)
 
 
Studio: Warner (New Line)
Rated: R
Film Length: 188 minutes
Aspect Ratio: 2.40:1
HD Encoding: 1080p
HD Codec: VC-1
Audio: English Dolby TrueHD 5.1; English DD 5.1 (compatibility track); Spanish DD 2.0
Subtitles: English SDH; Spanish
MSRP: $28.99
Disc Format: 1 50GB
Package: Keepcase
Theatrical Release Date: Dec. 17, 1999
Blu-ray Release Date: Jan. 19, 2010
 
 
 
 
Introduction:
 
Magnolia has devoted fans, but it still prompts criticism even ten years after its release. Which is strange, because Magnolia didn’t do any of the usual things that cause a film to engender lingering resentment, like make buckets of cash or capture awards that some felt should have gone to a “worthier” contender. So why, after all this time, should the mere announcement of the Blu-ray prompt a replay of old complaints that the film is unappealing, pretentious and indecipherable?
 
Like the famous Big Event that concludes Magnolia, some mysteries apparently aren’t meant to be explained; so let’s leave that question hanging and talk about the (mostly) excellent Blu-ray from Warner.
 
 
 
The Feature:
 
Magnolia is a difficult film to summarize, because it’s more about interactions than events (except for a certain Big Event near the end). People have made much of the many Biblical references hidden within the film, but these are no more than an inside joke. (A lengthy list is at IMDb, for those who are interested.) It’s well-documented that writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson wasn’t even aware of the specific text referenced throughout Magnolia (Exodus 8:2) until after the script was written and the film was in production. Besides, scripture doesn’t explain the story.
 
A more appropriate thematic talisman for Magnolia can be found in the three framing anecdotes narrated by magician and actor Ricky Jay (who has a small role in the film and whose book Learned Pigs and Fireproof Women makes a cameo). Each story is a tale of remarkable coincidence, but the third has a special significance and gets the most detailed treatment. It involves the attempted suicide of one Sydney Barringer, who, distraught over his unhappy home life, jumped off the roof of his apartment building and plunged nine stories, only to have his fall broken by a window washer’s safety net that would have saved his life – except that he was killed by an accidental shotgun discharge as he passed the sixth floor. The shotgun was fired by Sydney’s mother during one of her frequent arguments with Sydney’s father, but Mrs. Barringer thought the gun was empty. It turns out Sydney himself had loaded it several days earlier, hoping that his parents would kill each other. Sydney dies, Mrs. Barringer is jailed, and the narrator dryly spends a few minutes examining and re-examining this bizarre tangle of circumstances in which the actions of parent and child have become so inextricably intertwined in creating injury and destruction that it is no longer possible to say with any degree of certainty just who caused what. However, as the narrator says, “These strange things happen all the time.”
 
The rest of Magnolia demonstrates the narrator’s point – minus the shotgun blast.
 
Though Magnolia is often described as a series of overlapping stories, it’s really just one story told in many parts. A major aspect of a first-time viewing of Magnolia is gradually discovering the connections among the characters as their stories unfold onscreen. If you’ve never seen the film before and read beyond this paragraph, you will have that experience spoiled. You have been warned.
 
The film is set during a single day in the San Fernando Valley. It revolves around the families of two men who became wealthy from a successful game show franchise called What Do Kids Know? Both men are now dying of cancer. The key characters are:
 
 

             1.                            Earl Partridge (Jason Robards), producer of the game show, who, on his deathbed, is wracked with guilt over his decision, years earlier, to desert his first wife and young son.
 
             2.                            Linda Partridge (Julianne Moore), Earl’s second wife, who married him for his money, but then, to her own astonishment, found herself falling in love with Earl as she nursed him through his illness and now, at the end, is unhinged at the prospect of losing him.
 
             3.                             Frank T.J. Mackey (Tom Cruise), Earl’s son, who, after his father’s desertion, reinvented himself under a different name as a hugely successful self-help guru teaching men how to take control of their sexual destiny in testosterone-fueled seminars under the brand name “Seduce and Destroy”.
 
             4.                            Jimmy Gator (Philip Baker Hall), quizmaster and public face of What Do Kids Know?, a popular and even beloved figure in broadcasting, who is, in reality, a miserable sonuvabitch.
 
             5.                             Rose Gator (Melinda Dillon), Jimmy’s long-suffering wife, who, at the outset of the film, is the only one other than his doctors who knows that Jimmy has only a few months to live. Ever the supportive spouse, she will spend much of the day urging Jimmy to come home and rest, until the moment when Rose can no longer continue fooling herself about what kind of man Jimmy really is.
 
             6.                           Claudia Wilson Gator (Melora Walters), the daughter of Jimmy and Rose, who has been estranged from her parents for years and lives a life that is spinning wildly out of control, complete with substance abuse and casual sex with men she’s just met. Claudia is the textbook case of someone who is trying to blot out both the world and herself.
 
             7.                            Stanley Spector (Jeremy Blackman), the current star of What Do Kids Know?, a whiz-kid with a prodigious memory who is supporting his struggling actor father with his winnings as he feels increasingly alienated from the normal kids around him.
 
             8.                           “Quiz Kid” Donnie Smith (William H. Macy), an earlier version of Stanley, who wowed TV audience back in the 1960s, then saw his parents take all his winnings. Today Donnie ekes out a meager living selling electronics for Solomon Solomon (Alfred Molina) and dreaming of a love affair with a handsome bartender he barely knows but for whom he plans to have his teeth straightened with expensive oral surgery. On this particular day, Donnie will get fired and pushed to the breaking point. He’s an object lesson in what happens to kids after the Gator/Partridge empire has used them up.
 
             9.                            Phil Parma (Philip Seymour Hoffman), who is Earl Partridge’s favorite nurse, now that Earl needs round-the-clock care. It is to Phil that Earl will ultimately confide his regret at abandoning his son, and it is Phil who will, on this eventful day, respond to Earl’s request to find his son, Frank Mackey, and persuade him to see Earl.
 
             10.                         Officer Jim Kurring (John C. Reilly), a Valley cop, who, more than anyone else in Magnolia, represents the voice of decency, hope and common sense. Officer Jim encounters Claudia when he responds to a noise complaint by one of her neighbors, and he is instantly smitten. At the end of the film, he is the voice of hope for both Claudia and the rest of us.
 
 
Tennessee Williams wrote of “trying to catch the true quality of experience in a group of people, that cloudy, flickering, evanescent – fiercely charged! – interplay of live human beings in the thundercloud of a common crisis.” He was speaking of his own work, but he could have been describing Magnolia. As the film cuts among this group of vivid and often intense personalities, whose connections are so twisted and interwoven that none of them could fully grasp the entire structure the way a viewer can, each gets emotionally cornered by circumstances that none of them could have foreseen when they got out of bed that morning – and souls get laid bare. The results aren’t always pretty, and it’s not everyone’s idea of entertainment, but Magnolia is in distinguished company. There is a well-established canon of America drama that delves into tortured family relations at the critical moment when death enters the picture and the past catches up. Eugene O’Neill’s Long Day’s Journey Into Night is an obvious touchstone (and O’Neill was one of Anderson’s acknowledged inspirations), but so is Williams’ Cat on Hot Tin Roof, from which the above quote is taken. (It too took place in one day, involved an extended family, and featured a patriarch dying of cancer.)
 
But Magnolia isn’t all doom and gloom. Some of its best-known moments are also outrageously funny. Frank Mackey’s “Seduce and Destroy” seminars are so wildly over-the-top that you can’t help but laugh at Frank’s antics; Tom Cruise got an Oscar nomination for Mackey, probably because it’s the very opposite of the kind of “star” role that people expect from him. (When Mackey’s facade of bravado starts to crack during his interview with the reporter played by April Grace, it’s positively unnerving.) When Officer Jim faces off with a foul-mouthed suspect named Marcie, who does everything she can to prevent him from investigating a suspicious noise in her apartment (cursing, screaming, threatening, dragging the couch to which she’s handcuffed), only to proclaim after he’s found a body in her closet: “That ain’t mine!”, it’s outrageous and funny and you laugh even though some poor guy is dead on the floor. When Phil Parma is trying to track down Frank Mackey to fulfill Earl’s dying request and the only thing he can think of is to buy copies of the kind of magazine that might contain an ad for “Seduce and Destroy”, his negotiations with a grocery clerk about the specifics of his order are a treat. (“Do you still want the bread and peanut butter?”) And then there are the ongoing antics of Donnie Smith as he repeatedly makes a fool of himself in his quest for love. Played with the customary brilliance that William H. Macy brings to all his loser characters, Donnie’s scenes imbue sadness with humor in that special way of which only great clowns are capable.
 
(The humor in Magnolia can be subtle. It was only on the third viewing that I focused on the fact that Frank T.J. Mackey, macho man extraordinaire, has a female assistant, Janet, who, when she wants to get Frank on the phone with Phil Parma, raps out orders at a male subordinate like a puppy dog. Janet may collect a pay check from “Seduce and Destroy”, but she doesn’t sound like someone who could be either seduced or destroyed.)
 
Spoiler Alert: The Big Event that serves as Magnolia’s climax is, depending on one’s point of view, either a stroke of fantastical genius or an affront to the audience’s intelligence. Our tolerance for unexplained endings may be greater now after No Country for Old Men (and the Coens’ follow-up strange ending, A Serious Man), but Anderson’s choice to build his three-hour film to a rain of frogs that is never explained will always remain a risky one. Why not an earthquake (as Altman did in Short Cuts)? For narrative purposes, it would have accomplished all the same things.
 
Or would it? The last voice we hear in Magnolia is that of Officer Jim talking about difficult choices. “If you can forgive someone . . . well, that’s the tough part. (pause) What can we forgive?” Implicit in that last, fraught question is the understanding that not everything is subject to rational analysis, and that some of the most important decisions in life must be made on faith. Sometimes it takes a truly outlandish event to make people sit up and realize that not everything has to make sense. (And we movie audiences are a pretty jaded lot.) By ending Magnolia with a fantastical event, but one not unprecedented in nature (and, by the way, foreshadowed in the second of the three “framing” tales, that of the scuba diver scooped out of the lake and dropped into a tree by an aerial firefighter), Anderson was reminding both the characters and the viewers that strange things do happen all the time – that people forgive each other, recover from terrible harm, and move on with their lives. The final shot of the film is that of a character smiling, and it’s someone who hasn’t smiled once during the preceding three hours.
 
 
 
 
Video:
 
Warner has provided a superb transfer for Blu-ray that preserves the rich and lustrous appearance of Magnolia’s cinematography by Robert Elswit (who would later win an Oscar for Anderson’s There Will Be Blood). Black levels, detail and colors are all excellent. Some interior shots may appear too dark, especially if they’re silhouetted against an exterior light source, but this is how the film was shot. If there was any DNR applied, I couldn’t detect it. The film looks as thrillingly gorgeous as I remember it when I first sat entranced in a theater on Christmas Eve 1999.
 
One unfortunate side-note: Like the DVD, the disc has only 12 chapters. For a film with a 3:08 running time, that isn’t nearly enough.
 
 
 
Audio:
 
As one would expect for a dialogue-heavy film, the TrueHD track is front-heavy, with most of the activity in the center channel except for the film’s famous score of Aimee Mann songs. Less famous but equally impressive is the instrumental score by Jon Brion, and that too is beautifully represented by the TrueHD track. The only time when the surrounds really come alive is during the Big Event conclusion, and then they are fully engaged.
 
One thing that even the TrueHD track could not do, and that was make the rap performed by Dixon (the boy encountered by Officer Jim on a call early in the film and who appears at several key points later on) any more intelligible than it has ever been. I know what it says, because I have the shooting script, but even so, I still can’t make out the words when I watch the film.
 
 
 
Special Features:
 
With one exception, all of the special features on the New Line “Platinum Edition” DVD issued in 2000 have been included on this Blu-ray edition. That exception is what caused me to refer to the Blu-ray as “mostly” excellent in the introduction.
 
The DVD included a sort of “easter egg” feature that the people who prepared the Blu-ray may not even have been aware of. Both the special features disc and the setup section of the main film contained a listing for “Color Bars” that did indeed display a color bar test pattern for a few seconds, but then played about eight minutes of bloopers and gags featuring Luis Guzmán, Tom Cruise, Mary Lynn Rajskub (who survived in the final edit only as a voice), John C. Reilly and Philip Baker Hall.
 
If this gag reel has been hidden anywhere on the Magnolia Blu-ray, I couldn’t find it. And believe me, I looked.
 
Magnolia Video Diary (1:12:43) (SD; 4:3 centered in a 16:9 frame). More spontaneous than a commentary, more intimate than a documentary, this “diary” follows Anderson, cast and crew through the making of Magnolia up to and including the movie’s less-than-successful release. It’s hugely entertaining with a lot of funny moments, many of them at Anderson’s expense. (William H. Macy is especially funny.) If Anderson were really as pretentious and egotistical as his detractors like to imagine, this is the kind of thing that would never have seen the light of day.
 
Frank T.J. Mackey Seminar (3:56) (2.40:1; SD, 16:9 widescreen). Essentially an extended scene, this picks up from a point in Frank Mackey’s “Seduce and Destroy” seminar, where, in the film, we cut away to another character. It features scenes with Mary Lynn Rajskub, who is also the voice of Frank’s assistant, Janet.
 
Seduce and Destroy Infomercial. (1:33) (SD; 4:3 centered in a 16:9 frame). This is the full version of the infomercial for Frank’s seminar that plays on TV near the beginning of the film.
 
Save Me Video (4:46) (SD). The video for Aimee Mann’s Oscar-nominated song that plays over the credits, featuring sets and characters from the film.
 
Trailers (SD, 16:9 widescreen). Both the teaser trailer and the theatrical trailer are included. Both contain footage shot specifically for trailers in which principal characters introduce themselves directly to the camera. The teaser trailer is noteworthy because it indicates that Dixon, the kid who raps for Officer Jim, was originally intended to play a larger role. (The shooting script confirms this.) I suspect that, during the editing process, it became clear that Dixon’s story took the film too far off its dramatic center, which remains the Partridge and Gator families.
 
TV Spots. There are nine, each reflecting a different marketing focus.
 
 
 
In Conclusion:
 
After Magnolia, people started comparing Anderson to Robert Altman, sometimes favorably, sometimes not so much. I might agree with the comparison, except that I’d probably mean something different by it. Having grown up with Altman’s films, to me he’s someone who never made anything formulaic and never did the same thing twice. M.A.S.H. wasn’t anything like Brewster McCloud or McCabe and Mrs. Miller or Nashville or California Split or Streamers or Popeye or The Player or Cookie’s Fortune – and none of them was like Three Women (because not much is). The defining quality of an Altman film was that you never knew what you were going to get.
 
Anderson has made five films to date, and they’re all different. I’d call Magnolia his family drama. For all its cinematic panache – the long tracking shots, the sharp push-ins, the masterful cross-cutting among narrative lines – the film shares its core elements with a venerable tradition of dramatic work portraying people and families discovering themselves at moments of personal crisis. It’s a film I can’t start without watching it to the end, especially now that it’s on Blu-ray.
 
 
 
 
 
Equipment used for this review:
 
Panasonic BDP-BD50 Blu-ray player (TrueHD decoded internally and output as analog)
Samsung HL-T7288W DLP display (connected via HDMI)
Lexicon MC-8 connected via 5.1 passthrough
Sunfire Cinema Grand amplifier
Monitor Audio floor-standing fronts and MA FX-2 rears
Boston Accoustics VR-MC center
SVS SB12-Plus sub

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#2 of 20 TravisR

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Posted January 18 2010 - 02:22 PM

Thanks for the review, Michael. I can't wait to pick this up tomorrow.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Reuben 

Frank Mackey’s “Seduce and Destroy” seminars are so wildly over-the-top that you can’t help but laugh at Frank’s antics

I saw the movie multiple times in the theater and every time, people got up and left during his first scene. That made the movie funnier to me.

#3 of 20 Powell&Pressburger

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Posted January 18 2010 - 04:30 PM

 I remember the first time I saw it at the theatre, many people walked out, I had seen Boogie Nights on DVD and didn't know how special it was in the PTA filmography, I knew but at the same time who did? 


I saw it without knowing anything in 1999 except that I saw Boogie Nights and was blown away, and I went into Magnolia with a clean slate, open mind and the thought that with cinema and with creative talent you just never know, needless to say I think the first time I saw magnolia opening weekend or wide for the release I was blown away this was cinema, self-indulgent maybe so, but we are all human and I was in awe, and I could swear as Tom Cruise took the stage so to speak bout 20 walk outs, I and my friend stayed. It was genius and in its own way original, yeah PTA did homages to Scorese and Robert Altman but come on these weren't trashy or poorly done, these were with style, class, and humility and those he loved in film and paid respect to should and I hope, said hell yeah. good job it wasn't a rip off. it was done with artistry. 

NO pharmacy, deathbed, game show, police interrogation, dentist office, disturbance call, infomercial, will ever be the same. Magnolia was the best of 1999 and said so much, yes it is long, yes some say it could be short, but it is film, it is cinema and i you compare cinema to a feast Magnolia is the hors d'oeuvres. the main course, and the desert. All players are are at the top of their game and through pure human inclination do these characters breath, live die, grow. learn from the past and hopefully will move onward. 

Take into consideration character development, etc, and acting and editing it was a tour de force, so great for 1999  for PTA and he deserved accolades and at the Oscars it was panned, but as cinema history it will live on. 

The acting, editing, score( CD which I had to buy twice since it was stolen by friends twice, was repurchased JON BRION deserves praise, track to is Schindler's List and is remarkable), and THANK GOD for NEW LINE and producers and final  cut with out them I would be with out the final film and cut, that was MAGNOLIA and was the best film of 1999. 

It has been called a mosaic, Magnolia is a high form of filmic art. It was a brave movie and I am, still shocked Paul Thomas Anderson had final cut, bravo again to New Line and producers Michael De Luca, JoAnne Sellar, Dylan Tichenor, Lynn Harris, and Daniel Lupi that I hope read the script had faith and stood by the final product, even if it was non-profitable, marketable, but because with time, It was original, one of a kind, either you hated it or loved it, it was mag-no'li-a  






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#4 of 20 David Wilkins

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Posted January 19 2010 - 02:50 AM

 Michael, I think you've outdone yourself, with a fine analysis and review of 'Magnolia'. This film is a personal favorite, and I look forward to picking it up soon.



#5 of 20 Jon Martin

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Posted January 19 2010 - 03:47 AM

Great great film, great Blu-Ray (and I never even knew that easter egg was on the previous DVD!)

One problem I noticed on the Blu-Ray. 

In the documentary (which is one of my favorite making of documentaries), I had the subtitles on at one point.  There are a couple times where PTA's then girlfriend Fiona Apple talks and she is identified as RUDOLPH.  Whoever was doing the new subtitles thought that she was his current girlfriend Maya Rudolph.


#6 of 20 Michael Reuben

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Posted January 19 2010 - 04:16 AM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Martin 

In the documentary (which is one of my favorite making of documentaries), I had the subtitles on at one point.  There are a couple times where PTA's then girlfriend Fiona Apple talks and she is identified as RUDOLPH.  Whoever was doing the new subtitles thought that she was his current girlfriend Maya Rudolph.
 
I never turned on the subtitles, but that is funny. They don't even resemble each other. /img/vbsmilies/htf/laugh.gif
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#7 of 20 TravisR

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Posted January 19 2010 - 05:19 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Martin View Post

(and I never even knew that easter egg was on the previous DVD!)

 

The easter egg from Boogie Nights is MIA on that Blu-ray too.

#8 of 20 Adam_S

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Posted January 19 2010 - 06:21 AM



Quote:
Originally Posted by TravisR 

I saw the movie multiple times in the theater and every time, people got up and left during his first scene. That made the movie funnier to me.
1999 was the year I got interested in cinema, and at my request we rented the double vhs the weekend it came out on video (summerish 2000) it got to Tom Cruise's scene and my mom lasted about two minutes before saying it was one of the most disgusting movies she'd ever seen and she wasn't going to let us watch filth like that and ejected the vhs and stuffed it back in the rental sack.

That meant I HAD to watch the rest of it.  so about 12:30 that night I grabbed it out of the sack, took it back to my room and stayed up to watch the rest of it. I was particularly taken by Stanley's story, and the Save Me sequence.  the frogs never bothered me as I figured, A) it was pretty damn bold and awesome, and B) it had been explained earlier with the three "incredible" real life stories of ridiculous absurd coincidences that open the movie.

the only thing I was really confused about was the little Black Kid,  the Prophet, which I watched like three times and still didn't understand. :D


 

#9 of 20 TravisR

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Posted January 19 2010 - 11:04 AM

I just got done watching the disc and it looks great.

It's been a few years since I saw the movie and I had forgotten that Michael Bowen, Patton Oswalt and Veronica Hart were in the movie. And I could be wrong but I think that Mary Lynn Rajskub is the voice of Frank's assistant and I believe that Claudia does cocaine off of an Aimee Mann CD case.

#10 of 20 Michael Reuben

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Posted January 19 2010 - 11:57 AM



Quote:
Originally Posted by TravisR 

And I could be wrong but I think that Mary Lynn Rajskub is the voice of Frank's assistant and I believe that Claudia does cocaine off of an Aimee Mann CD case.
You're not wrong! /img/vbsmilies/htf/smile.gif

(Re: Frank's assistant, see my write-up of the Frank T.J. Mackey Seminar under "Special Features". It's perfect casting.)


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#11 of 20 TravisR

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Posted January 19 2010 - 02:29 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Reuben ">

You're not wrong! <br /></span>
<br />
(Re: Frank's assistant, see my write-up of the <strong class='bbc'>Frank T.J. Mackey Seminar</strong> under "Special Features". It's perfect casting.)<br />
<br />
 </div></div>
<br />
I didn't even remember that extended scene where they actually show Rajskub. And just so I don't seem like a total illiterate, I read all of your review except the special features breakdown (I've seen them and knew they were nearly all being ported over from the DVD). <span rel='lightbox'><img class='bbc_img' alt=

#12 of 20 Michael Reuben

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Posted January 19 2010 - 03:22 PM



Quote:
Originally Posted by TravisR 


I didn't even remember that extended scene where they actually show Rajskub. And just so I don't seem like a total illiterate, I read all of your review except the special features breakdown (I've seen them and knew they were nearly all being ported over from the DVD). /img/vbsmilies/htf/smile.gif
I figured as much -- we're talking minutia here. /img/vbsmilies/htf/laugh.gif

Although the shooting script doesn't actually say this, the scenes with Rajskub always struck me as "training videos" to be shown during the "Seduce and Destroy" sessions. If you think of them that way, it kind of makes sense that Frank would tape them in-house and use his own assistant.

I'm fascinated by the stories of people walking out (or switching off) during the Frank Mackey presentations. I understand being offended, because that's the whole point. But if you quit then, you miss out on the whole payoff --  first, during the interview with Gwen, the reporter, and then when Frank visits Earl. And it's a rich payoff.
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#13 of 20 Russell G

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Posted January 20 2010 - 04:29 AM

Great review!  I have this on it's way to me with Boogie Nights.  I haven't watched either of them since their DVD releases, and really look forward to re-watching Magnolia.  I'm yet to be able to get through it without a bit of tearing up.

I was hoping for a commentary, but you're right, that documentary is a good one.  I think it was in that and not on the gag reels that had a scene with Anderson demonstrating to Hoffman why he doesn't want him to improv with some medication on a side table.  Funny stuff.  It also has a preliminary meeting before any footage is shot, and Anderson says the film will be 3hours and 13 minutes long (or some such number), I remember thinking he might be a master to be able to plan it out that close.


#14 of 20 Brian Borst

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Posted January 20 2010 - 06:34 AM

I first saw Magnolia taped off the BBC. I didn't know how long it was when I started watching it, I just started watching it, and ended up watching it in four parts. With a lot of other movies I probably wouldn't have bothered, but here I just had to continue. The funny part was that it was already panned and scanned by the Beeb, and it was broadcast in my house as 4:3, so we only got the dead center of the frame. When the master shot with Claudia and Jim's dialog came, I just saw the furniture between them.
And still I loved it. I bought the dvd after it. No matter what others said about it, it was always pretty high on my top 10 or 20. The other PTA movies took much longer to grow on me, for some reason, apart from There Will Be Blood. I do enjoy all of them, now. Anderson is a favorite director of mine.
Of course this Blu-ray will be mine. I now can watch the gorgeous cinematography of Robert Elswit in a good quality, and hear the fabulous Jon Brion score in a high quality, and without PAL speedup. Can't wait for it.

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#15 of 20 Eric Peterson

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Posted January 21 2010 - 12:14 AM

This will be one of the first and only films that I upgrade for.  It stinks that I won't be able to eliminate my old DVD though (For the Easter Egg, which I previously didn't know existed!) - I gotta go home and watch that tonight!!


#16 of 20 Norman Matthews

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Posted January 21 2010 - 01:31 PM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Reuben View Post
So why, after all this time, should the mere announcement of the Blu-ray prompt a replay of old complaints that the film is unappealing, pretentious and indecipherable?
I'm guessing it has something to do with a guy named Kevin Smith.

#17 of 20 Vincent_P

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Posted January 22 2010 - 03:46 AM

I'm going to disagree (has Kevin said ANYTHING about the MAGNOLIA Blu-ray?) and say it has to do with reviewer Michael Reuben, since he's the one who brought up the "controversy" in the announcement thread to begin with:

http://www.hometheat...ay#post_3648573

Vincent

Quote:
Originally Posted by Norman Matthews 




I'm guessing it has something to do with a guy named Kevin Smith.



#18 of 20 TravisR

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Posted January 22 2010 - 03:51 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincent_P View Post

(has Kevin said ANYTHING about the MAGNOLIA Blu-ray?)


As an avid listener of his podcast and reader of his nonstop posts on Twitter, I haven't heard a peep from him about it.

#19 of 20 Michael Reuben

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Posted January 22 2010 - 04:22 AM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincent_P 

I'm going to disagree (has Kevin said ANYTHING about the MAGNOLIA Blu-ray?) and say it has to do with reviewer Michael Reuben, since he's the one who brought up the "controversy" in the announcement thread to begin with:


You're aiming in the wrong direction, Vince. I referred to a ten-year-old event -- one that you not only confirmed, but for which you provided informative and valuable context. I never claimed, nor would I, that there's any continuing controvery regarding Magnolia from the direction of View Askew. That's Norman Matthews' point, and I don't think much of it either.

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#20 of 20 Vincent_P

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Posted January 22 2010 - 09:25 AM

Gottcha, Michael.  Sorry for the misunderstanding.

Vincent