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Oppo BDP-83 put in Lexicon case and sold for $3000 more


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#1 of 12 OFFLINE   DaveF

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Posted January 16 2010 - 04:23 AM

http://www.audioholi...xicon-outside-1

Quote:
When we received the player the first thing we did was open it up to get a look at the inside. Imagine my surprise when I found that not only did the Lexicon share the same boards and transport as the Oppo - it was in fact AN OPPO BDP-83 PLAYER, CHASSIS AND ALL, SHOVED INSIDE AN ALUMINUM LEXICON WRAPPER. As far as we could determine, Lexicon didn't change a single thing in terms of the hardware. Heck, they didn't even lift the boards out of the chassis, opting instead to cut out the bottom of their own chassis to accommodate the venting locations, and putting a darker blue filter over the Oppo's VFD display to give it a slightly deeper hue.
I don't know anything about Lexicon or Oppo. But I'm again reminded that THX has long since destroyed their name and sells only meaningless certifications.


#2 of 12 OFFLINE   Keith Plucker

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Posted January 16 2010 - 07:43 AM

From the article
Quote:
Sadly they paid for THX certification and THX happily took their money to allow Lexicon to slap their badge on the front panel - apparently without actually testing to see if it met the core requirements of which we would suppose any THX Blu-ray player would have to adhere. If THX is doing this with Blu-ray players, it makes you wonder what they are doing with A/V receivers and other THX certified products.

Ouch! Unfortunately not terribly surprising. I wonder how much traction this story will get and if it will have any impact on high-end gear sales. Guess we will see.

-Keith


As far as I'm concerned, it's a damned shame that a field as potentially dynamic and vital as journalism should be overrun with dullards, bums, and hacks, hag-ridden with myopia, apathy, and complacence, and generally stuck in a bog of stagnant mediocrity. - Hunter S. Thompson, 1958, from cover letter he wrote for a newspaper job.


#3 of 12 OFFLINE   Adam Barratt

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Posted January 16 2010 - 04:05 PM

This really isn't a new phenomenon. High end manufacturers have sold re-badged equipment for many years. What really amazes me in this case are the facts that Lexicon stated that the player had been improved in some way (a la Ayre or Theta's treatment), when it clearly hadn't; and that the Lexicon player received THX certification when it didn't meet the required standards. That's a black eye for both Lexicon and THX.

Together with these two organisations, hometheaterreview.com has also been caught in the vortex of disrepute with their review of the Lexicon at http://hometheaterre...layer-reviewed/

Quote:
I am sure people will attack this player as a "rebadged" Oppo, so I went out and bought an Oppo BD-83 SE in order to fairly compare the two. First off, there is no comparison between the build quality of the two players. The Oppo is lighter and the buttons have a far less solid feel to them. The Lexicon is a taller, much heftier unit. Black levels were close, but the Lexicon had a more natural contrast and color palette than the Oppo.
Several people commented in a perfectly respectable and respectful fashion that the players were the same machines, asking if the reviewer wished to revise his opinion, but these comments have all been removed. Everyone involved in this debacle is getting egg on their face, and throwing their reputations to the wind with abandon. Remarkable.

Adam

#4 of 12 OFFLINE   DaveF

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Posted January 16 2010 - 04:21 PM

I'll have to keep that in mind: when I'm researching a new purchase I cast about for reviews from sites I'm not especially familiar with. I try to figure out who's writing good info, but it's easy to be mistake attitude for expertise.

But it may be a clue that the A/V review is off-kilter when mass is an important criteria ("The Oppo is lighter").

#5 of 12 OFFLINE   Selden Ball

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Posted January 17 2010 - 05:25 AM

Weight has traditionally been one of the secondary indicators of quality audio equipment. Usually it's because a larger transformer was used in the power supply of a receiver or amp, which can make a significant difference in the audio output. A sturdier (thus heavier) mechanical build can be good for anything with moving parts. A more massive turntable helps when playing vinyl discs, too, since it reduces wow and flutter.

It's sad when people go by that without checking other parameters, though. :(

Selden

#6 of 12 OFFLINE   DaveF

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Posted January 17 2010 - 07:31 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball 

Weight has traditionally been one of the secondary indicators of quality audio equipment. Usually it's because a larger transformer was used in the power supply of a receiver or amp, which can make a significant difference in the audio output. A sturdier (thus heavier) mechanical build can be good for anything with moving parts. A more massive turntable helps when playing vinyl discs, too, since it reduces wow and flutter.
None of which have anything to do with reading digital media :)



#7 of 12 OFFLINE   Selden Ball

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Posted January 17 2010 - 12:28 PM

Well, sturdiness does, at least over the long term. I suspect a "heavy" player made of metal parts, with a drawer which opens and closes silently and a drive which repositions its heads quietly is likely to last a lot longer than a light one made of flimsy plastic which makes scraping sounds when opening, closing and seeking a new video file. The latter describes most BD players costing less than $200. :(


Selden

#8 of 12 OFFLINE   gene c

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Posted January 17 2010 - 12:47 PM

I always use weight as one of many things to consider when comparing components. But unless they stuffed it with gold bars there sure isn't a $2500 difference between the two.
"Everyday room": Panasonic 58" Plasma, Dish HD DVR, Pioneer Elite vsx-23, BDP-23 BR, dv58avi universal dvd player, Paradigm Studio 20 V1, CC-450, Dayton HSU-10 subwoofer.

"Movie/Music room": Toshiba 65" DLP, Dish HD receiver, Marantz 7005, CC-4003, BD-7006, Polk LSI25's-LSi7's-LSiC, 2 original Dayton 10" "Mighty-Mites" subwoofers. (subject to change without notice).
 
Also have  MB Quart Vera VS05 +.....too much to list. Help me.
 
 

 


#9 of 12 OFFLINE   DaveF

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Posted January 17 2010 - 02:24 PM

Mass does not indicate sturdiness. Heaviness does not mean stiffness. And a reviewer gauging a Blu Ray player's quality based on "it's heavier" is to be avoided, at least by me.


#10 of 12 OFFLINE   Stephen_J_H

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Posted January 18 2010 - 06:43 AM

Am I the only one who thinks this is hilarious? A classic case of "caveat emptor" if I've ever seen one. In the automobile world, this would be the equivalent of the Cadillac Cimarron: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadillac_Cimarron.
"My opinion is that (a) anyone who actually works in a video store and does not understand letterboxing has given up on life, and (b) any customer who prefers to have the sides of a movie hacked off should not be licensed to operate a video player."-- Roger Ebert

#11 of 12 OFFLINE   RobertR

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Posted January 18 2010 - 08:28 AM

From the Audioholics review:

Quote:
Apparently there is a bass management recombination issue with the Lexicon that doesn't exist with the Oppo since the Oppo receives numerous updates. To our knowledge, Lexicon has yet to offer any firmware updates for their player to address such issues. Thus at this time I must correct our previous statement that both players are identical and now state that the Oppo actually fairs better than the Lexicon when using the analog audio outputs and bass management facilities under the current firmware Lexicon supports their BD-30 player.
So people are being asked to spend 3000 bucks more for a player that performs worse.  



#12 of 12 OFFLINE   Edwin-S

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Posted January 18 2010 - 11:58 AM

From the hometheatrerevew
Quote:
 This isn't some Japanese stamped steel player, and for the price, it shouldn't be.
At least he was right about this. It is a stamped steel CHINESE player in a shiny coat.
"You bring a horse for me?" "Looks like......looks like we're shy of one horse." "No.......You brought two too many."




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