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The Demise of VHS


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#1 of 39 OFFLINE   Finn

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Posted December 31 2009 - 05:11 AM

This is not the newest article but thought it was worth sharing here.  
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#2 of 39 OFFLINE   RickER

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Posted December 31 2009 - 12:03 PM

 I was an LD guy. Never bought a VHS tape in my life. But i did use tape to time shift shows. Before the joy known as TiVo.

Shoot, i have not owned a VCR in over 10 years!


#3 of 39 OFFLINE   RobertR

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Posted December 31 2009 - 12:24 PM

I was surprised when I read in the article that less than 4% of feature films in the TCM database are available on DVD.  I would have thought it was higher than that.


#4 of 39 OFFLINE   Adam Gregorich

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Posted January 01 2010 - 05:56 AM

I pulled out all our VCRs a few years ago.  I still have a bunch of Disney live action that have never made it to DVD, but years ago I switched all avaiable titles from VHS to LD and I have several LDs that haven't made their way to "affordable" DVD yet (Four Feathers being my favorite).  As much as they get knocked here I think the DVD on demand services that studios are starting is the best solution, since there isn't a big enough market for some of the titles.  This thread reminds me that I have a bunch of EP recorded movies in a box I need to get rid of that I recorded off premium channels back in the day (quantity not quality /img/vbsmilies/htf/blush.gif the indiscretions of youth!)

I think its market specific too.  I asked someone from Panasonic what the heck they were thinking with releasing a BD/VCR combo player.  They said it was developed for South America and some education markets, where VHS won't seem to die.

#5 of 39 OFFLINE   Ockeghem

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Posted January 01 2010 - 06:02 AM

I purchased a combo player (multi-regional) two or so years ago.  I will be purchasing one or two more so I will have that capability for many years to come.  We now have around 900 VHS tapes, and we watch many of them each week, both for entertainment and for educational purposes.

#6 of 39 OFFLINE   Trekkie313

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Posted January 01 2010 - 06:21 AM

I'm not a fan of VHS but I've recently gotten into collecting rare and obscure tittles on VHS. Many horror films have never made it to DVD or LD and can fetch alot of money


#7 of 39 OFFLINE   Adam Gregorich

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Posted January 01 2010 - 10:56 AM


Quote:
We now have around 900 VHS tapes

WOW Scott.  Thats a huge library.  How/where do you store them?

#8 of 39 OFFLINE   Scott Merryfield

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Posted January 01 2010 - 01:41 PM

I still have a JVC S-VHS machine (as well as my original JVC Hi-Fi VHS recorder purchased back around 1985), but neither are currently connected to the home theater.  I still have some titles that are exclusive to VHS, but I have archived them all to DVD-R.

Probably my most prized VHS title is The Compleat Beatles, a terrific documentary that will most likely never be released again. It was the very first VHS title I purchased after buying that JVC machine in the mid 1980's.


#9 of 39 OFFLINE   Ockeghem

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Posted January 01 2010 - 02:48 PM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam Gregorich 



WOW Scott.  Thats a huge library.  How/where do you store them?
Adam,

When we built our home, the plans included a 400 sq. ft. library.  We double up 'like' titles (e.g., television shows); otherwise, all unique titles are just shelved one-by-one on our shelving units, which consist of 7.5 foot high units from floor to ceiling, with each around 24"-40" wide.  We have about fifteen of these units.  Some are used for DVDs, books, tapes, serials, etc.  What's really nice about these units is that our builder constructed adjustable shelving -- this comes in really handy with books of varying sizes and shapes.  Additionally, we planned for differing depths, so shelving for LPs -- which needed 12" from front-to-back -- are also included.

#10 of 39 OFFLINE   Ockeghem

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Posted January 01 2010 - 03:05 PM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Merryfield 

Probably my most prized VHS title is The Compleat Beatles, a terrific documentary that will most likely never be released again. It was the very first VHS title I purchased after buying that JVC machine in the mid 1980's.
 
Scott,

I agree wholeheartedly.  It is a fine documentary (which I own on VHS).  I also own the two-volume music scores for virtually all of their songs (pre-Anthology I, Anthology II, and Anthology III, of course).  These scores look very much like the VHS box cover (the same coloring and accompanying stripes are used).  Although these scores are not perfect, they are very well representative of the actual notes (including keyboard solos) used on several of the Beatles recordings.  And for the most part, they reproduce the tracks in their original keys.  (When they do not, they furnish a footnote which includes the key of the original.)

BTW, did I mention that I received The Beatles Anthology (five DVDs) recently?  I will have a ton of fun watching this. :)


#11 of 39 OFFLINE   Scott Merryfield

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Posted January 02 2010 - 12:40 AM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Ockeghem 


BTW, did I mention that I received The Beatles Anthology (five DVDs) recently?  I will have a ton of fun watching this. :)
You should really enjoy the Anthology set, Scott. I recently re-watched my copy, and was once again amazed at the depth of the documentary. Of course, being an "authorized" set, it does tend to gloss over some of the incidents that were more unpleasant. That is why I like The Compleat Beatles so much -- it is much more balanced. That is also why it will probably never be released again.


#12 of 39 OFFLINE   Bob McLaughlin

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Posted January 02 2010 - 05:49 AM

On the flipside, the advent of DVDs has made tons of movies available to me through Netflix.  In the VHS era I was at the mercy of the local rental stores.  Through Netflix I've finally gotten to see hundreds of movies I couldn't see on VHS because no local rental stores carried them.

Funny story: I was at Half-Price Books the other day and some old man came up to the counter and said "Where do you keep your movies?" and the clerk pointed out the DVD section to him, and the old man shook his head and said "No, the MOVIES."  It took some discussion but what he meant was VHS tapes.  Funny that he didn't even consider DVDs to be movies.  See what Blu-Ray is up against?  I still get people who say "What's Blu-Ray?"
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#13 of 39 OFFLINE   Stan

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Posted January 02 2010 - 10:40 AM

Have always been an avid OAR purist, so never bought VHS until they started coming out wide screen. Luckily this overlapped with the intro of DVD and I knew which format would win, so only have about 20 VHS movies.

Still used them for time-shifting, the whole TIVO thing didn't seem like it was that big of a deal.

Wrong. Not until I got fed up with Comcast and had DISH installed last summer did I realize what I was missing. Haven't played a tape since. Although I did actually hold onto my "Wrath of Khan" Betamax just as a memory of a long, lost format.
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#14 of 39 OFFLINE   Kevin Hewell

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Posted January 02 2010 - 08:27 PM

I still have a ton of tapes. There are just some dedicated PBS shows that I wouldn't have otherwise.
Quote:
They said it was developed for South America and some education markets, where VHS won't seem to die.



#15 of 39 OFFLINE   Walter C

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Posted January 04 2010 - 01:45 AM

If it wasn't for TV shows on DVD, I would probably not even know what a DVD is.

I still use VHS to record shows, not nearly as much these days, with Hulu and other sites offering full episodes. 

TV Episodes Watched - 2009 (1419 ep) / 2010 (1367 ep) / 2011 (1509 ep) / 2012 (1440 ep) / 2013 (1191 ep) / 2014 - December
Feature Films Watched - 2012 (97 seen) / 2013 (100 seen)
Shorts Watched - 2012 (222 seen) / 2013 (87 seen)

Books Read - 2013 (12 read)


#16 of 39 OFFLINE   Finn

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Posted January 04 2010 - 03:34 PM

 i will not part with my VHS of The Death of The Incredible Hulk, with commercials and all.
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#17 of 39 OFFLINE   LarryH

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Posted January 04 2010 - 03:41 PM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Ockeghem 




Adam,

When we built our home, the plans included a 400 sq. ft. library.  We double up 'like' titles (e.g., television shows); otherwise, all unique titles are just shelved one-by-one on our shelving units, which consist of 7.5 foot high units from floor to ceiling, with each around 24"-40" wide.  We have about fifteen of these units.  Some are used for DVDs, books, tapes, serials, etc.  What's really nice about these units is that our builder constructed adjustable shelving -- this comes in really handy with books of varying sizes and shapes.  Additionally, we planned for differing depths, so shelving for LPs -- which needed 12" from front-to-back -- are also included.
/img/vbsmilies/htf/drool.gif Envy.....

I have VHS tapes by the boxload - but now I need a system for storing DVD-R's as well....



#18 of 39 OFFLINE   Ockeghem

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Posted January 04 2010 - 04:01 PM

Larry,

Yeah, it was well worth the wait.  My wife and I rented for eighteen years before we bought our first home.  We just decided to make the first home we bought one we designed ourselves (our 'dream home'), since we could not find any home on the market that had a library and a music room already in it.

#19 of 39 OFFLINE   Bob McLaughlin

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Posted January 05 2010 - 01:10 AM

Even though I don't have a working VCR in the house, I still have my VHS copies of my daughters' ultrasounds, The Beatles Archives, and about 6 episodes' worth of MTV's 120 Minutes program from the early 90's.
"I'LL SHOW YOU THE LIFE OF THE MIND!!!" - Barton Fink

#20 of 39 OFFLINE   Jon_Are

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Posted January 13 2010 - 03:58 AM


Quote:
Probably my most prized VHS title is The Compleat Beatles
Scott - You've just inspired me to seek out a copy of this. I remember viewing it many years ago and loving it.