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Do studios look at Amazon entries?


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#1 of 5 OFFLINE   bmasters9

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Posted June 16 2009 - 05:47 AM

Do studios like Paramount and Sony and Warner look at the Amazon listings for the series that they release to determine whether to continue releasing them? I would have thought, for example, that with the majority of the ratings/reviews on #2 of "Hart to Hart" being of the 5-star (sterling) variety, a strong demand for more would be indicated. Unfortunately, that demand, apparently, has not translated into further releases, as it seems that favorable ratings are not enough.

On the other hand, we're already halfway through "Hawaii Five-O" from CBS DVD/Paramount, and the majority of the ratings/reviews there (or a lot of them) also reflect a sterling opinion (5 stars). It is amazing that for one series, sterling reviews do not make for more releases, and for another, they do.
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#2 of 5 OFFLINE   Curtis F

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Posted June 16 2009 - 07:34 AM

I don't think opinions matter that much to them. All they look at are sales numbers.

#3 of 5 OFFLINE   jamoon2006

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Posted June 16 2009 - 07:50 AM

From some of the shows I've seen on Amazon, it looks like there are a lot of reviews are from fans who give the DVD five stars before it's even released. The reviews are more for the show itself than the quality of the DVD. In other words, I don't know how much the good reviews at Amazon indicate or influence sales.

I think it's true in the reverse - I don't think BAD Amazon reviews prompt studios to change bad practices. Check out the reviews for some Paramount properties like Perry Mason or Cannon. The boards are filled with one and two-star reviews decrying the high price of a split season set, as well as the split-season practice itself, but that hasn't changed Paramount's mind.

#4 of 5 OFFLINE   Joseph DeMartino

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Posted June 16 2009 - 07:50 AM

Quote:
It is amazing that for one series, sterling reviews do not make for more releases, and for another, they do.


First of all, your premise is incorrect. You're assuming that the reviews are the cause of the release in the one case, when nothing could be further from the truth. Sterling reviews do not "make for more releases in one case." They are utterly irrelevant to the process in both cases.

Compare the situation to theatrical films: A well-reviewed film that is also a box office hit will likely get a sequel. No surprise. But another well-reviewed film that is a box office flop won't get a sequel, and this is no surprise either. People tend to continue to produce stuff that makes money and not produces stuff that doesn't. In both cases irrespective of reviews.

I seriously doubt anyone at the studios pays any attention to Amazon reviews or ratings, unless maybe to see how the extras are reviewed.

Regards,

Joe

#5 of 5 OFFLINE   Mark Talmadge

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Posted June 16 2009 - 08:47 AM

No, they don't. Amazon is only a retailer. They are not an indicator of how well a title is selling. Amazon's ratings reflect how they sell at Amazon.com, not nationwide.

Studios look at the overall sales numbers. When a DVD title is sold, (everytime a copy of a DVD title is sold, those sales numbers are tallied, just like how they compile the Nielson ratings by compiling all of those numbers) those sales figures are compiled and reported on and that's how the studios determine if further seasons get released.