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What was the last "Classic" movie made? (Pre-1970 era)


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#1 of 16 OFFLINE   DanielKellmii

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Posted May 15 2009 - 12:17 AM

I was watching "Lawrence of Arabia" and it sturck me that this might have been the last "Classic" movie of that era. "Lawrence" was made in 1962. The following year "Cleopatra" came out. That was a legendary disaster. As far as I can recall, the next epic movie that came out that has had any staying power was "The Godfather." That was 10 YEARS later. Was it really that long? Am I missing some movies in between? And, in my opinion, "The Godfather is from a different era than "Lawrence."

#2 of 16 OFFLINE   Raasean Asaad

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Posted May 15 2009 - 03:47 AM

how about:

2001: A Space Odyssey


1968
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#3 of 16 OFFLINE   Brandon Conway

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Posted May 15 2009 - 09:01 AM

I guess it's how you would define "epic". To me, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly definitely qualifies.

"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#4 of 16 OFFLINE   Brian Borst

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Posted May 15 2009 - 09:53 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Conway
I guess it's how you would define "epic". To me, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly definitely qualifies.

Wouldn't 'Once Upon A Time In The West' fit the description better? It's from 1968.
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#5 of 16 OFFLINE   Brandon Conway

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Posted May 15 2009 - 11:23 AM

I'd day they both fit the description.

"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#6 of 16 OFFLINE   Bill GrandPre

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Posted May 15 2009 - 12:27 PM

The Bond films go as far back as '62. Are they "classics" in the same way "Lawrence of Arabia", "2001: A Space Odyssey" or "The Godfather" are classics? Obviously not but they obviously have "staying power" and I'd still call them classics in their own way, several of them, at least.
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#7 of 16 OFFLINE   Pete-D

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Posted May 15 2009 - 07:32 PM

Would Easy Rider qualify? I think 2001 certainly does.

So would Dr. Strangelove.

#8 of 16 OFFLINE   Tino

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Posted May 15 2009 - 10:08 PM

The Graduate
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#9 of 16 OFFLINE   Chad R

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Posted May 16 2009 - 01:34 AM

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
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#10 of 16 OFFLINE   DanielKellmii

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Posted May 16 2009 - 01:37 AM

The Good, the Bad and The Ugly is a great one. I was thinking more along the line of the way a film was directed. For example, In "Lawrence" there was a lot of fighting, but very little blood shown. That was just the way it was done in those days. Same thing with "The Good...." As great as 2001 is, it was a bit on the experimental side. I am not a film student (hint hint to the film students) but 2001 was a very different movie for its day. It is STILL a very different movie. I think of 2001 as a transitional movie between two eras of movie making. The first time I saw it, I couldn't believe that it was made in 68.
The Bond films are ... well, the Bond films. Grab some popcorn and have fun.
"Easy Rider" What are you smoking? (hahahaha) It is a story about an epic journey, so in that sense it fits my mold. On the other hand, Hopper directed it which makes it pretty unique. I just can't imagine Captain America being played by a classically trained actor.
The Graduate is one that I think fits the bill. If that film was made today, the sex scenes would be much more explicit. Maybe this one is a transitional film too.
Ummmm, I've never seen "Once upon a time..." Ohh the shame.
Thanks for the discussion.

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Posted August 16 2009 - 01:29 AM


Spartacus was a film that broke the mould of blacklisting that had defined Hollywood for so long, by crediting its previously blacklisted screenwriter. You could say the golden age of Hollywood ended with Spartacus. The 60's were an unusual decade too. The blockbusters, like The Great Escape, weren't as predictable as the 50's ones. I think it probably took until 1970 for it to die, though, according to that doco A Decade Under the Influence (ie, the 70's). That was the decade where the studios had no idea what would sell, so there was so much less homogoneity in them, to put it mildly. To find the last "classic" hollywood title, you could try scanning the Oscars 67-69. West Side Story is a good example of a really late title with that innocent classicism, rich use of colour that defined most of our favourite classics of the colour era.
Edited by Ben Cheshire - 8/19/2009 at 05:53 pm GMT

#12 of 16 OFFLINE   sappoi

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Posted December 15 2009 - 01:47 PM

How about The Godfather .

#13 of 16 OFFLINE   DanielKellmii

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Posted January 31 2010 - 09:26 AM

Ben, I like the term "Innocent Classicism." Is that something you made up or is that an acedemic term? I think that is what my question was driving at; the innocence that seems no longer to be allowed. Your example is perfect. Can you imagine "West Side Story" being released today? It would be a financial disaster.

#14 of 16 OFFLINE   Kevin Hewell

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Posted January 31 2010 - 11:44 AM

I would categorize Dr. Zhivago (1965) as a classic Hollywood film.


#15 of 16 OFFLINE   PatW

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Posted February 07 2010 - 02:30 AM

1969 produced both Midnight Cowboy and Butch Cassidy. I think they both would qualify.

#16 of 16 OFFLINE   Rick Thompson

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Posted February 18 2010 - 01:35 PM

Saving Private Ryan.

All four times I saw it, nobody said anything after the lights came up. It was that powerful.