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Books you've read in 2008


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#1 of 124 DaveF

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Posted January 05 2008 - 09:15 AM

The Books You've Read in 2007 thread seemed to go well, and I'm endeavoring to read more this year, so I'll give a 2008 version a kickstart. Posted Image

I'll just borrow from Walter's starting post from 2007 to get going:
Quote:
Getting the idea from TV on DVD challenge and Track the Films You Watch, I'll try it with the books that we've read in 2008, and if you want, your review of the book. And it can include those that we started reading in 2007, but finished in 2008.

I'll start off...

The Android's Dream by John Scalzi -- A very fun, hard to put down SF book. Recommended.

A Grey Moon over China by Thomas A. Day -- The plot, the core story, was interesting -- a man's desire to escape Earth and its pains, wars, evils leads to pain, war, and evil. But the writing was middling; it had three times the pages it needed and yet never seemed to say enough to be clear about what was happening. This is a "C" for me.

#2 of 124 Michael Warner

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Posted January 06 2008 - 12:31 PM

"The Day of Battle" by Rick Atkinson. Book two of "The Liberation Trilogy" looks at the Allied invasion of Sicily and Italy. His books are consistently the most readable and enjoyable of World War Two histories.

And I'm anxiously awaiting Bernard Cornwell's fourth book in "The Saxon Chronicles, "Sword Song" for some Viking era escapist reading.

Good call on the John Scalzi -- "Old Man's War" is one of my favorite sci-fi novels of recent origin.
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#3 of 124 Joe D

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Posted January 06 2008 - 01:56 PM

I've been meaning to update my reading list in the 2007 thread, but I'll throw them here instead.

Starting in late October of 07, I began re-reading George RR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire Series. This is my first re-read of the series, and everything went fantastic, I typically enjoy most books better the 2nd time through due to a better understanding of the world, characters etc, and this did not disappoint.

A Game of Thrones - Fantastic, Ned's POV's are particularly revealing.
A Clash of Kings - Davos' POV's shed new light into Robert and Ned that is lacking from AGOT.
A Storm of Swords - WOW, what a great book. As in ACOK in regards to Davos, Jaime's POV's are a great twist to everything we have read so far.
I especially liked at the end of A Storm of Swords, Littlefinger remarks that Cersei is not as smart as she thinks she is, and in A Feast for Crows, her stupidity is revealed


The latest book, A Feast for Crows, read much better on the 2nd go around then it did the first, probably because I had forgotten most of what had happened in the series, who people were, etc. etc. due to the lengthy time between A Storm of Swords and A Feast for Crows.
I think George tied up Arya's story well in the book with her becoming blind because she is becoming an acolyte, as well as Jaime's story in that Cersei begs for his help while he opens up the window and it's snowing. BUT, I didn't like that Brienne's POV ended with her saying a word.


George has said that he hopes to resolve some of the loose ends of AFFC in his next book, A Dance With Dragons.

I also read The Hedge Knight, a short story by Martin, and I am going to read The Sworn Sword, also by Martin.

What I'm looking forward to in 2008:

George Martin's A Dance with Dragons - George has said he needs to get this done this year, and I think it will happen. At least, I hope it will.

Ian Esslemont's Return of the Crimson Guard - This is the 2nd book set in the Malazan Empire written by Esslemont, and I think it will take place after Steven Erikson's The Bonehunters novel.

And Finally,

Steven Erikson's Toll The Hounds - The 8th book (out of 10) in the Malazan Empire that will be released by Erikson I believe in August, it is already done and Erikson is supposed to be well on his way in writing the 9th book, Dust of Dreams. Toll the Hounds is supposed to be awesome according to some early reports.

#4 of 124 Carlo Medina

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Posted January 06 2008 - 01:58 PM

In progress:

World Without End, by Ken Follett


In the pipeline:

The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini
Soon I Will Be Invincible, by Austin Grossman
Then We Came to the End, by Joshua Ferris
Duma Key, by Stephen King

#5 of 124 McPaul

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Posted January 06 2008 - 05:16 PM

Almost finished Michael Chrichton's Next. Great read so far!

#6 of 124 Jason Kirkpatri

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Posted January 07 2008 - 01:43 AM

Stephen Kings' Dark Tower Series (all seven of them). Book 5 and 6 were a bit of a dissapointment as the supporting characters took a bit of a different attitude than what was presented in the first four books. The ending was a surprise to me, and also a bit of a let down.

Currently finishing off C.S. Lewis's Narnia series (light reading for a change of pace). Last read the series when I was in grade 5.

Next is Tolkien's Hobbit followed by the Lord of the Rings. I've had the books for 10+ years and still have yet to read them. I have seen the movies, though.

#7 of 124 Walter C

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Posted January 07 2008 - 02:38 AM

I've slacked off big-time, by the middle of 2007. Just one of those reading slumps that I get from time-to-time.

TV Episodes Watched - 2009 (1419 ep) / 2010 (1367 ep) / 2011 (1509 ep) / 2012 (1440 ep) / 2013 (1191 ep) / 2014 - August
Feature Films Watched - 2012 (97 seen) / 2013 (100 seen)
Shorts Watched - 2012 (222 seen) / 2013 (87 seen)

Books Read - 2013 (12 read)


#8 of 124 Holadem

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Posted January 07 2008 - 02:44 AM

Quote:
Starting in late October of 07, I began re-reading George RR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire Series. This is my first re-read of the series, and everything went fantastic, I typically enjoy most books better the 2nd time through due to a better understanding of the world, characters etc, and this did not disappoint.
After I tore thru the first 4 books, I was in such withdrawal that I would read random passages on a daily basis. So in a sense, I feel like I've read the thing more than once already (especially AGoT to which I went back extensively).

You know, I need to include reading this series in the highlights of 07 thread. It's an unconventional choice, but truly, some of the very best moments of last year were spent in this universe.

--
H

#9 of 124 nolesrule

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Posted January 07 2008 - 02:46 AM

I read The Hobbit over the weekend, and just started on Lord of the Rings. I don't get to read many books anymore, so reading these is a bit like comfort food for me. I doubt I'll get any other books in during 2008.

#10 of 124 Holadem

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Posted January 07 2008 - 03:05 AM

I've been reading the odd short story in Night Shift from Steven King, picked up at some library sale for $.50 last year. Jerusalem's Lot, precursor to the full fledged novel Salem's Lot was a fun homage to Lovecraft's Call of Chutlhu (sp?).

--
H

#11 of 124 Andy Sheets

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Posted January 07 2008 - 07:17 AM

Cthulhu Posted Image

I've been reading some Stephen King myself. Kind of going back and re-reading his early, better work to reassess my opinion of his work. So I'm reading The Stand right now (I was actually reading Salem's Lot only to discover the copy I had was missing pages. D'oh!). Also read Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption a couple of weeks ago.

I'm also finishing up a collection called Stark and the Star Kings, by Edmond Hamilton and Leigh Brackett. It's an excellent but slightly odd book - it begins by reprinting Hamilton's The Star Kings, then it reprints the three Eric John Stark novellas by Brackett, then Hamilton's Star Kings sequel, Return to the Stars, and then finishes up with a rough draft of a story that crosses the two series over, which was written by both Hamilton and Brackett. Great old pulp sci-fi.

I'm also reading Conquistador, by SM Stirling. It's a sci-fi story in which a disgruntled WWII vet accidentally opens a portal in his basement to an alternate Earth in which America was never colonized by Europeans, so he rounds up some of his war buddies and they decide to colonize it. The book is kind of a slog, mostly because it's just really overwritten with lots of extraneous details and go-nowhere characterization, but it's kept me sufficiently interested that I keep reading. I keep feeling like I'm just on the verge of it cutting loose with the action Posted Image

#12 of 124 Michael Warner

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Posted January 07 2008 - 03:32 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Sheets
I'm also reading Conquistador, by SM Stirling...The book is kind of a slog, mostly because it's just really overwritten with lots of extraneous details and go-nowhere characterization, but it's kept me sufficiently interested that I keep reading. I keep feeling like I'm just on the verge of it cutting loose with the action Posted Image

I find all of Stirling's books to be like this but the underlying ideas are often so interesting that I tend to read them all anyways. I just use a skip forward method while reading his stuff that compresses it all into a few hours.
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#13 of 124 Holadem

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Posted January 08 2008 - 07:11 AM

This is a good place to ask: Has anyone else tried to read Cormac McCarty's All the Pretty Horses and absolutely could not get past the first few pages because of the unconventional writing style? The book is highly regarded, but reading it was like pulling teeth, and I tried quite a few times. Surely I can't be the only one.

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#14 of 124 DaveF

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Posted January 09 2008 - 01:37 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul McGowan
Almost finished Michael Chrichton's Next. Great read so far!
That was the latest one, about genetic engineering? I read that a year or two ago when it came out. It was fun, but I thought it was one of Crichton's sloppier books. He couldn't seem to figure out what story he wanted to tell, so he just made stone soup of all his ideas Posted Image

I've begun Skunk Works, and am about halfway through The Order of the Phoenix with my wife.

#15 of 124 ChristopherG

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Posted January 09 2008 - 02:01 AM

Last night I finished "The Rising" by Brian Keene. A lovely tale of apocalyptic demon zombie goodness! I then started the sequel, "City of The Dead".

Good stuff, if you like zombie tales....Posted Image
It takes 52 pounds of pressure to rupture an eyeball... :blink: 
 

 


#16 of 124 KurtEP

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Posted January 09 2008 - 02:06 AM

I actually had some time to read for pleasure.

Yesterday, I picked up Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain. Great book. This is the first book I read from cover to cover without putting it down (and in one sitting) since Rawicz's The Long Walk a few years back.
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#17 of 124 Adam Lenhardt

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Posted January 19 2008 - 10:21 AM

Count me in as another who lost track of the 2007 thread.

So far this year I've read:
Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie - My third or fourth Poirot novel recently, after Murder on the Orient Express, Cat Among the Pigeons and Mrs. McGinty's Dead. A richer basis for a mystery than some of the others, but with a resolution that has since become very, very tired. Still, I'm going to keep going through her works because they satisfy the same urge as an episode of one of the "Law & Order" series do.

Star Wars: Allegience by Timothy Zahn - He did a pretty good job approximating the characters as they behaved during the original trilogy. Not a huge event-changing novels, but not bad for a minor EU tale.

I put a copy of Coraline by Neil Gaiman on order at the local Borders in anticipation of the upcoming movie, but I'm heading back to Boston tomorrow and it hasn't come in yet.

#18 of 124 Joe D

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Posted January 24 2008 - 03:05 PM

Fevre Dream by George RR Martin. This was a real fun book to read. It is about steamboats, rivers, vampires, and is set in the 1800's. It is an interesting take on vampires and contains a 10-20 page section that is a complete knock out.

This was my first non ASOIAF experience by Martin and I am quite impressed.

I bought all the Del Rey Robert E. Howard compilation books and I am currently reading The Coming of Conan The Cimmerian. This so far has been a very fun read, some of the tales are great, some are good, some are so so, but all the tales are high energy affairs.

#19 of 124 Adam Lenhardt

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Posted January 24 2008 - 05:57 PM

Just finished:
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie, with that most politically correct of its three titles on the cover. Somehowe I managed to avoid watching all of the various adaptations of Ten Little Indians over the years, so the ending and resolution was a complete shocker to me. Probably the first one since Murder on the Orient Express where I truly did not suspect the murderer until the big reveal — and thinking back at the evidence I can't really say she cheated. A wonderful pulpy horror vibe to the whole affair, too, which I appreciated. After plenty of Hercule Poirot, I was ready for something a little less orderly and aristocratic.

#20 of 124 Holadem

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Posted January 25 2008 - 03:32 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam Lenhardt
Just finished:
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie, with that most politically correct of its three titles on the cover. Somehowe I managed to avoid watching all of the various adaptations of Ten Little Indians over the years, so the ending and resolution was a complete shocker to me. Probably the first one since Murder on the Orient Express where I truly did not suspect the murderer until the big reveal — and thinking back at the evidence I can't really say she cheated. A wonderful pulpy horror vibe to the whole affair, too, which I appreciated. After plenty of Hercule Poirot, I was ready for something a little less orderly and aristocratic.
I think I read just about every Agathe Christie detective novel in my childhood and teens. Back then I naively used to wonder if I wouldn't run out of stuff to read by the time I "grew up".

Have you read The Murder of Roger Ackroyd? It doesn't get mentioned as often as Orient Express (which I never liked much, have correctly predited the outcome) or Ten Little Indians but it's my favorite work of hers. If you haven't, I trust you will not be dissapointed.

--
H


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