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*** Official NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN Discussion Thread


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#1 of 100 MikeRS

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Posted September 10 2007 - 05:16 PM

Ebert calls it a "perfect film".

http://rogerebert.su....ALS03/70908002

#2 of 100 JonZ

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Posted November 07 2007 - 07:18 AM

James B gave it 3 and 1/2 stars, really liking it.

http://www.reelviews...no_country.html

"Not to mention that Javier Bardem portrays a monster with such a sick mind that it almost makes Norman Bates in Psycho seem normal."

He called Bardems character the best on screen villian since Hopkins Lecter in SOTL

#3 of 100 Bill GrandPre

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Posted November 10 2007 - 07:31 PM

I won't be able to see this before the wide release on the 21st and I have a message to everyone that's already seen it:

I hate you.
Don't you ever, EVER compare me to "Family Guy," you hear me Kyle? Compare me to "Family Guy" again and so help me, I will kill you where you stand!

Do you have any idea what it's like? Everywhere I go: "Hey Cartman you must like 'Family Guy,' right?" "Hey, your sense of humor reminds me of...

#4 of 100 MikeRS

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Posted November 10 2007 - 10:14 PM

Yeah, it's awesome. Posted Image Posted Image

The thing is, you could legitimately just declare it one of greatest suspense thrillers ever made and call it a day. It's riveting stuff, and what film wouldn't be content with that label. But what really stays with you when you leave the theater are the philosophical meditations/probings. The film has an extremely existential perspective. All the choices/decisions the character make are really key (And Bardem definitely represents our awareness and anxiety of impending death/chaos. He's definitely not any kind of "rational" force in the world).

#5 of 100 Robert Crawford

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Posted November 10 2007 - 10:18 PM

This thread is now designated the Official Discussion Thread for "No Country for Old Men". Please, post all comments, links to outside reviews, film and box office discussion items to this thread.

All HTF member film reviews of "No Country for Old Men" should be posted to the Official Review Thread.

Thank you for your consideration in this matter.


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#6 of 100 Jose Martinez

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Posted November 11 2007 - 12:51 PM

Damn!!!! I wanted to see this today but it was sold out!!!!!!
Live Free or DIE!!!!!

#7 of 100 JonZ

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Posted November 11 2007 - 02:17 PM

Looks like Im prob gonna have to wait until the 21st tooPosted Image

#8 of 100 Thi Them

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Posted November 11 2007 - 02:42 PM

I'm going to try to see it again next weekend. Posted Image

~T

#9 of 100 Jefferson Morris

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Posted November 12 2007 - 09:18 AM

Saw it this weekend. Haven't enjoyed a Coen film as much since Fargo, and I may even prefer it to that film, although I still have to chew on it a bit to really determine its merit.

Everything they're saying about Javier Bardem is true. You can't look away any time he's on screen, even when you want to.

Most of the film's running time is a flawlessly executed thriller, a la Blood Simple, with some semi-philosophical musings from Tommy Lee Jones' sheriff character thrown in. Then the last act of the film takes a narrative turn that will leave some viewers frustrated, but which really serves to foreground those hitherto background themes and forces you to think about them. Your willingness to do so will largely dictate your response to the ending.

I guess I don't really have to avoid spoilers here, but I will anyway, since it appears few have seen this one yet. Suffice to say that this is a must-see, certainly a return to form for the Coens, although it will divide people.

--Jefferson Morris
"If fakes, they were masterpieces."

--The New York Times commenting on Willis O'Brien's dinosaurs in The Lost World (1925).

"From the two trailers I've seen, the movie looks like AIDS."--Recent thread post on AICN

#10 of 100 Chuck Mayer

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Posted November 12 2007 - 11:22 AM

I'll pop a review in for this tomorrow. I did want to give a quick take. It has a VERY challenging third act, but it is set up from many previous scenes. It's brilliantly made, and Bardem is as menacing as any actor has ever been in ANY role. Key word: EVER.

More tomorrow,
Chuck
Hey buddy...did you just see a real bright light?

#11 of 100 MikeRS

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Posted November 12 2007 - 12:52 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jefferson Morris
Most of the film's running time is a flawlessly executed thriller, a la Blood Simple, with some semi-philosophical musings from Tommy Lee Jones' sheriff character thrown in. Then the last act of the film takes a narrative turn that will leave some viewers frustrated, but which really serves to foreground those hitherto background themes and forces you to think about them. Your willingness to do so will largely dictate your response to the ending.

I would probably still love the film without that ending, but I don't think it would have haunted my thoughts (and dreams!) so strongly, even 3 days after seeing it. The 'concept' is straight from the novel, but constructing it as part of a cinematic narrative has to be seen as an incredibly audacious and risky move by the Coens. While yes, it might baffle some in the short term, I am certain this is exactly why the "film as a piece" will be percieved long term as something quite more than a "flawlessly executed thriller".

#12 of 100 Jefferson Morris

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Posted November 13 2007 - 10:17 AM

By calling the first three-quarters of the movie "flawlessly executed," I didn't mean to imply that I think it goes wrong at the end. What I really meant to say is that the film morphs from a pretty straightforward suspense film into something more mercurial, and - I agree - haunting.

I also expect the film's reputation to grow. And I can't wait for the high-def disc--this'll be the first Coen film that I will actually purchase on video in a very long time (I haven't been really jazzed by anything they've done since Fargo. Yes, including the much-loved Lebowski.)

--Jefferson Morris
"If fakes, they were masterpieces."

--The New York Times commenting on Willis O'Brien's dinosaurs in The Lost World (1925).

"From the two trailers I've seen, the movie looks like AIDS."--Recent thread post on AICN

#13 of 100 MikeRS

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Posted November 13 2007 - 06:10 PM

I hear ya. Posted Image

#14 of 100 Henry Gale

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Posted November 14 2007 - 03:13 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill GrandPre
I won't be able to see this before the wide release on the 21st and I have a message to everyone that's already seen it:

I hate you.

What Bill said. Posted Image

I can't believe this wasn't opened in Austin earlier.
"I was born to ramble, born to rove
Some men are searchin for the Holy Grail
But there ain't nothin sweeter 
Than riden' the rails."
-Tom Waits-

#15 of 100 Richard Kim

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Posted November 14 2007 - 03:27 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jefferson Morris
And I can't wait for the high-def disc--this'll be the first Coen film that I will actually purchase on video in a very long time (I haven't been really jazzed by anything they've done since Fargo. Yes, including the much-loved Lebowski.)

--Jefferson Morris

Yeah, the only question will be whether it will be on HD DVD or Blu Ray, since both Paramount and Miramax (Disney) are distributing the film.

I can't wait to see the film this weekend. In the meantime, I'm preparing myself by watching a Coen bros. marathon.

#16 of 100 Jefferson Morris

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Posted November 15 2007 - 10:33 AM

Ah, the joys of format neutrality.

--Jefferson Morris
"If fakes, they were masterpieces."

--The New York Times commenting on Willis O'Brien's dinosaurs in The Lost World (1925).

"From the two trailers I've seen, the movie looks like AIDS."--Recent thread post on AICN

#17 of 100 Carlos_E

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Posted November 17 2007 - 04:08 AM

I just saw this film last night. WOW. Even though I did not like the ending, I have been constantly thinking about the movie in general. What can you say about Javier Bardem that has not already been said? One of the most menacing villains in the history of cinema. Not just recent history but all history.


Possible Spoilers below********** Dont read if you haven't seen film



There is an aspect of the film which continues to dwell in my mind. Can people on this forum confirm the large or total absence of music or soundtrack throughout the film?? Was there music during the opening credits or during the opening scenes on the dessert? I cant remember but I strongly believe there wasnt. I think the lack of music in the background makes this movie that much more effective.

Was there a soundtrack in the background during the middle of the movie or during the ending scenes?

#18 of 100 Craig S

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Posted November 17 2007 - 05:19 PM

Carlos, I believe you're right - there is no score in NCfOM until the end credits. IMO this was a stroke of genius by the Coens, as it showcased Craig Berkey's brilliant sound design for maximum effect. Who could have imagined the sound of the unscrewing of a light bulb could be so chilling??

Three truths about movies, as noted by Roger Ebert:

 

* It's not what a movie is about, it's how it is about it.

* No good movie is too long, and no bad movie is short enough.

* No good movie is depressing, all bad movies are depressing.


#19 of 100 Carlos_E

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Posted November 18 2007 - 07:00 AM

Craig:

You are right. Some of the sounds in that movie, in the absence of music, are so unnerving.


Spoilers below************ Don't read if you haven't seen the movie.


That sound of the rifle weapon with the silencer attached in the end. That thing just makes me very very uneasy. I don't think there is any way that I would have been remotely as affected by it if there was music in the background. The scene in the hotel right after the bad guy unscrewed the lightbulb and blew out the lock. And the battle outside as the good guy tries to make a getaway in the truck, with the deadly silent bullets and that damn silencer making that noise. The AWARENESS of sounds in the absence of a soundtrack is startling. Sounds that would be drowned out in other movies making use of soundtracks. Craig, you are right. It was brilliant sound design.

#20 of 100 Richard Kim

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Posted November 18 2007 - 10:34 AM

I also noticed that there no musical score for pretty much the entire film. Which is strange considering that Carter Burwell (who has scored all the Coens' films) was given a credit in No Country.

This is definitely a film that requires repeat viewings to fully comprehend. I'm definitely gonna see it again this week.




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