Jump to content



Sign up for a free account to remove the pop-up ads

Signing up for an account is fast and free. As a member you can join in the conversation, enter contests and remove the pop-up ads that guests get. Click here to create your free account.

Photo
* * * * - 4 votes

Mannix is coming!

Paramount

  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
2218 replies to this topic

#1901 of 2219 OFFLINE   jompaul17

jompaul17

    Supporting Actor



  • 945 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 23 2011

Posted September 20 2013 - 07:30 AM

"Man In A Trap" is the episode I have next up to watch. It's been there, it seems, for like a month. I need to get back to watching MANNIX so I can finish it up and check out some of the ones I've missed, and then go back an re-watch some favorites.

 

Harry

Harry,

 

Looking forward to those posts!!



#1902 of 2219 OFFLINE   Harry-N

Harry-N

    Screenwriter



  • 2,153 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 09 2003
  • Real Name:Harry N.
  • LocationSunny Central Florida

Posted September 20 2013 - 09:30 AM

As I read your recent posts (and my own), I realized that I could grab Season One on MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE off of the shelf and refresh my mind as to why John Colicos and Joseph Campanella in the same episode somehow didn't make a lasting impression on me.

 

And I think the answer is casting, story, and make-up. First off, Joseph Campanella in the episode comes off as a mild-mannered, bespectacled, brainy type, not as the dynamic and athletic type that he usually played. Oh, it's clearly him, through the accent and all, but he was playing against type here.

 

John Colicos, on the other hand, LOOKS like an Eastern European type as the story demands, so I guess I never found his odd (to me) appearance anything noteworthy.

 

As for your somewhat off-topic post Joann, I know just how that can happen. Heck, my own post here has little to do with MANNIX! And if it was therapeutic to get it all out here, well, then so be it. And it served as reminder that we all have "stuff" going on in our lives beyond the keyboard.

 

Harry


My DVD Collection

A fugitive moves on, through anguished tunnels of time, down dim streets, into dark corners. And each new day offers fear and frustration, tastes of honey and hemlock. But if there is a hazard, there is also hope. - Closing narration to THE FUGITIVE, "Death Is The Door Prize".

#1903 of 2219 OFFLINE   Harry-N

Harry-N

    Screenwriter



  • 2,153 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 09 2003
  • Real Name:Harry N.
  • LocationSunny Central Florida

Posted September 20 2013 - 11:55 AM

My memory (which may be wrong) is that the episode has a clue based upon the use of a $100 bill -- and that makes me wonder if $100 bills even still exist.  

 

$100 bills are still in circulation and common, and remain the largest denomination of US currency at this time.

 

The episode deals with a $1000 bill and that's a large denomination that's no longer made. Large currency denominations were once used principally by banks in their transactions with each other, but after a time, that practice was discontinued and so were the large bills.

 

The US Federal Reserve effectively withdrew these large bills back in 1969, just a few years before this MANNIX episode ("Man In A Trap"), so Joe is aware that in order to be passing around such large denominations, someone had to jump through some hoops somewhere.

 

I've not actually completed the episode, but I saw enough of it before nodding off to see the seen of Joe deducing the relative rarity of the $1000 bill as a piece of currency.

 

John McLiam played the PI who gets knocked off in the opening scene by Erik Estrada. McLiam was a character actor whose face was everywhere in television. Madlyn Rhue makes an appearance here - she who captivated the mighty Khan in STAR TREK's "Space Seed."

 

In reading through THESE ARE THE VOYAGES PART 1 about the first season of STAR TREK, I learned that Joe d'Agosta, the casting manager for Desilu came up with a scenario where he'd hire guest stars on a three-fer basis. That is, instead of paying them say $1500 for a guest shot on STAR TREK, he'd double the price and get them on three different series. So instead of the going rate, he'd actually pay them less per appearance, but guarantee them work in three different series, which explains why there are so many cross-series appearances of these actors on STAR TREK, MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE and MANNIX.

 

Harry


My DVD Collection

A fugitive moves on, through anguished tunnels of time, down dim streets, into dark corners. And each new day offers fear and frustration, tastes of honey and hemlock. But if there is a hazard, there is also hope. - Closing narration to THE FUGITIVE, "Death Is The Door Prize".

#1904 of 2219 OFFLINE   jompaul17

jompaul17

    Supporting Actor



  • 945 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 23 2011

Posted September 20 2013 - 12:08 PM

Harry,

Just a short note to say -- you are the greatest!

(More on the posts later...)

Edited by jompaul17, September 20 2013 - 12:08 PM.


#1905 of 2219 OFFLINE   Dan McW

Dan McW

    Second Unit



  • 344 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 12 2004
  • Real Name:Dan

Posted September 20 2013 - 12:55 PM

Harry, what is the Mannix font/typeface that you use in your avatar?



#1906 of 2219 OFFLINE   Harry-N

Harry-N

    Screenwriter



  • 2,153 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 09 2003
  • Real Name:Harry N.
  • LocationSunny Central Florida

Posted September 20 2013 - 02:50 PM

Harry, what is the Mannix font/typeface that you use in your avatar?

 

It's either "City" or "SquareSlab711", I forget which. We discussed that many, many pages ago in this thread. It seems to me that I found "City" first, but that "SquareSlab" was closer to the real font.

 

Harry


My DVD Collection

A fugitive moves on, through anguished tunnels of time, down dim streets, into dark corners. And each new day offers fear and frustration, tastes of honey and hemlock. But if there is a hazard, there is also hope. - Closing narration to THE FUGITIVE, "Death Is The Door Prize".

#1907 of 2219 OFFLINE   Dan McW

Dan McW

    Second Unit



  • 344 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 12 2004
  • Real Name:Dan

Posted September 23 2013 - 06:52 AM

It's either "City" or "SquareSlab711", I forget which. We discussed that many, many pages ago in this thread. It seems to me that I found "City" first, but that "SquareSlab" was closer to the real font.

 

Harry

 

Thanks, Harry.



#1908 of 2219 OFFLINE   Harry-N

Harry-N

    Screenwriter



  • 2,153 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 09 2003
  • Real Name:Harry N.
  • LocationSunny Central Florida

Posted September 23 2013 - 07:36 AM

You're welcome ,Dan.

 

While under the weather the last day or so, I've had a chance to catch up on a couple of MANNIX episodes. "Man In A Trap" (8.14), I finally finished, and I followed it up with "Chance Meeting" (8.15).

 

As we mentioned, "Man In A Trap" hinges on a $1000 bill found in someone's hand, and by 1975, the Fed had removed $1000 bills from circulation, so only those grandfathered in circulation were out there. Joe was astute enough to realize it - and I loved the line that Peggy said she hadn't seen a $1000 bill since her last raise!

 

The old "Don" was played by the great Peter Brocco, an unsung character actor who generally fades into the background of virtually ever series ever filmed. A few of his other roles:

 

STAR TREK

JAN_PeterBroccoST2.JPG

 

ZORRO

JAN_PeterBroccoZorro.JPG

 

VOYAGE TO THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA

JAN_PeterBroccoVTTBOTS.JPG

 

THE OUTER LIMITS

JAN_PeterBroccoOL.JPG

 

BEWITCHED

JAN_PeterBroccoBW.JPG

 

TWILIGHT ZONE: THE MOVIE

JAN_PeterBroccoTZTM.JPG

 

THE TIME TUNNEL

15_Brocco.JPG

 

...and there were countless more, including THE FUGITIVE and at least three different episode of MANNIX, including "The Sound Of Darkness."

 

More on the next episode later.

 

Harry


Edited by Harry-N, September 23 2013 - 08:22 AM.

My DVD Collection

A fugitive moves on, through anguished tunnels of time, down dim streets, into dark corners. And each new day offers fear and frustration, tastes of honey and hemlock. But if there is a hazard, there is also hope. - Closing narration to THE FUGITIVE, "Death Is The Door Prize".

#1909 of 2219 OFFLINE   Harry-N

Harry-N

    Screenwriter



  • 2,153 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 09 2003
  • Real Name:Harry N.
  • LocationSunny Central Florida

Posted September 25 2013 - 04:32 PM

"Chance Meeting" (8.15) was a Vietnam War Vet story, a rather common theme in television dramas of the period. The MANNIX take on the situation has the deserter descending into a life of crime (funneling drugs) and the willingness to snuff out anyone who could potentially get in his way. The situation touches Peggy personally so naturally Joe is on-the-case. We also get to see a quite-grown Toby in this episode.

 

Geoffrey Deuel plays one of the Vets in this episode, he the brother (and lookalike) of Peter Duel, who'd had some success on ALIAS SMITH AND JONES in the early '70s before dying a tragic death.

 

Not my favorite MANNIX episode...

 

Harry


My DVD Collection

A fugitive moves on, through anguished tunnels of time, down dim streets, into dark corners. And each new day offers fear and frustration, tastes of honey and hemlock. But if there is a hazard, there is also hope. - Closing narration to THE FUGITIVE, "Death Is The Door Prize".

#1910 of 2219 OFFLINE   Jack P

Jack P

    Producer



  • 3,157 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 15 2006

Posted September 25 2013 - 04:52 PM

In reading through THESE ARE THE VOYAGES PART 1 about the first season of STAR TREK, I learned that Joe d'Agosta, the casting manager for Desilu came up with a scenario where he'd hire guest stars on a three-fer basis. That is, instead of paying them say $1500 for a guest shot on STAR TREK, he'd double the price and get them on three different series. So instead of the going rate, he'd actually pay them less per appearance, but guarantee them work in three different series, which explains why there are so many cross-series appearances of these actors on STAR TREK, MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE and MANNIX.

 

Harry

 

Most notably, Leslie Parrish turning up in S1 and in her opening scene wearing the same Greco-costume she wore in the Trek episode "Who Mourns For Adonias."



#1911 of 2219 OFFLINE   Harry-N

Harry-N

    Screenwriter



  • 2,153 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 09 2003
  • Real Name:Harry N.
  • LocationSunny Central Florida

Posted September 26 2013 - 05:06 AM

Most notably, Leslie Parrish turning up in S1 and in her opening scene wearing the same Greco-costume she wore in the Trek episode "Who Mourns For Adonias."

 

As documented originally by yours truly way back in February of 2009. I first noted it on a STAR TREK BBS:

http://www.trekbbs.c...53&postcount=22

 

News spread here that same day:

http://www.hometheat...-ray/?p=3407401

 

And, you and I have been down this very road before over in THE FUGITIVE thread:

http://www.hometheat...me-1/?p=3642142

http://www.hometheat...me-1/?p=3642334

 

It was truly a remarkable re-use of not only cast members but wardrobe too.

 

Harry


My DVD Collection

A fugitive moves on, through anguished tunnels of time, down dim streets, into dark corners. And each new day offers fear and frustration, tastes of honey and hemlock. But if there is a hazard, there is also hope. - Closing narration to THE FUGITIVE, "Death Is The Door Prize".

#1912 of 2219 OFFLINE   Harry-N

Harry-N

    Screenwriter



  • 2,153 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 09 2003
  • Real Name:Harry N.
  • LocationSunny Central Florida

Posted October 01 2013 - 06:29 AM

In an off-topic note, congratulations must go to the Pittsburgh Pirates for finally getting to the MLB playoffs via a wild card berth in the NL. I know our resident MANNIX expert is a Pirates fan, and I'm always happy for a Pennsylvania team.

 

This year, for the moment, I find myself rooting for my adopted home team, the Tampa Bay Rays, who also squeaked in with a Wild Card berth on the AL side.

 

Harry


My DVD Collection

A fugitive moves on, through anguished tunnels of time, down dim streets, into dark corners. And each new day offers fear and frustration, tastes of honey and hemlock. But if there is a hazard, there is also hope. - Closing narration to THE FUGITIVE, "Death Is The Door Prize".

#1913 of 2219 OFFLINE   Harry-N

Harry-N

    Screenwriter



  • 2,153 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 09 2003
  • Real Name:Harry N.
  • LocationSunny Central Florida

Posted October 07 2013 - 05:57 AM

It's been awhile, and I haven't progressed any further in season 8, but I recently had a desire to watch a MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE. In trying to pick one to watch, it occurred to me how much like a MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE episode the season 7 MANNIX two-parter, "Race Against Time" was. I'd started watching that one a while ago and fell to the sleepies.

 

Well this time I made it through, and found the whole thing rather enjoyable - as a MISSION:-type episode. It certainly fell outside the realm of a normal MANNIX. It felt a bit stretched too, with lots of chase scenes and long comings and goings - thing usually left out of MANNIX with its tight editing. As I mentioned in a previous post, the cast here is nearly all MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE veteran guest stars, and there are a lot of times when it seemed like Joe was just standing around.

 

Harry


My DVD Collection

A fugitive moves on, through anguished tunnels of time, down dim streets, into dark corners. And each new day offers fear and frustration, tastes of honey and hemlock. But if there is a hazard, there is also hope. - Closing narration to THE FUGITIVE, "Death Is The Door Prize".

#1914 of 2219 OFFLINE   Harry-N

Harry-N

    Screenwriter



  • 2,153 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 09 2003
  • Real Name:Harry N.
  • LocationSunny Central Florida

Posted October 20 2013 - 03:31 AM

Episode 17 of Season 8, "A Ransom For Yesterday" has Mannix trying to track down kidnappers and a long-lost son. Diana Hyland guested as the mother who hires Joe. Her somewhat estranged husband is a closer-to-the-right-age Dabney Coleman. (Every time I see Dabney Coleman as a young man guesting in a '60s-era show, he just looks too darned young!)

 

Howard Hesseman, in his pre-Johnny Fever days, plays one of the kidnappers, and Alan Oppenheimer in the authority figure. A short, but amusing role of a rumpled journalist goes to Woodrow Parfrey.

 

A feeling I get watching a lot of the season 8 episodes is that this might have been a transition year for the series. Different writers and directors (Bill Bixby here) have been giving the series a different feel. It's hard to describe, but some of the episodes seem to be veering off into a feeling I'd get watching a different '70s-style private eye or cop drama. I suppose it was a natural evolution as they were clearly in the middle of the '70s and trying to stay relevant and hip.

 

What makes it so hard to convey is that Joe is still Joe, Peggy is still Peggy, yet the show "feels" different. 

 

Harry


My DVD Collection

A fugitive moves on, through anguished tunnels of time, down dim streets, into dark corners. And each new day offers fear and frustration, tastes of honey and hemlock. But if there is a hazard, there is also hope. - Closing narration to THE FUGITIVE, "Death Is The Door Prize".

#1915 of 2219 OFFLINE   bretmaverick2

bretmaverick2

    Second Unit



  • 443 posts
  • Join Date: May 18 2009

Posted October 24 2013 - 04:41 AM

Hey, the Mannix episode that was the basis for an episode of DIagnosis Murder is gonna be included in the full series set of DM!!!   Nice!!



#1916 of 2219 OFFLINE   Harry-N

Harry-N

    Screenwriter



  • 2,153 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 09 2003
  • Real Name:Harry N.
  • LocationSunny Central Florida

Posted October 24 2013 - 05:13 AM

That's a cool idea. I wish they'd have included the whole episode of DIAGNOSIS MURDER on the MANNIX DVDs.

 

Harry


My DVD Collection

A fugitive moves on, through anguished tunnels of time, down dim streets, into dark corners. And each new day offers fear and frustration, tastes of honey and hemlock. But if there is a hazard, there is also hope. - Closing narration to THE FUGITIVE, "Death Is The Door Prize".

#1917 of 2219 OFFLINE   Mark Collins

Mark Collins

    Screenwriter



  • 2,134 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 21 2008

Posted October 26 2013 - 01:17 PM

Harry you are right about the change of feel in the show in season 8. I remember that feel when it first aired on CBS.  Yes I did have a ranting effect of Laura being used sort of in a Mannix script.  The problem goes even deeper than that.  I just did not like to see Joe with any woman except Peggy.  How cool if they had just broke in season 8 and let fans see Peggy and Joe together.  I know we all joke about Peggy being in danger but really I find those shows have something that pulls me in anyway. Harry because of you I have started to rewatch season 8 on Sunday nights.  The first one I went to was Joe thinks Peggy is dead but the producers were smart enough to only let that stand for a few minutes.  I thought now this show knows their viewers.

 

Yes and as viewer back when season 8 aired I only saw certain episodes and unhappy and happy with the canceling of it and then ABC night time pick up.  I now can see that it could have went on for a few more seasons but they needed a fresh take and they had Joe and Peggy and did not use it.

 

Well the DM plot wrapped the series up for me as I have stated here before.  Joe and Peggy were still together and the producers were wise enough not to tell us how.

 

I only saw that episode when it aired live.  I was not a DM fan and that was the only one I ever watched becuase I had read about Joe Mannix being in it.  The funny thing is I have never seen it again since and maybe that is the way it is suppose to be for me.



#1918 of 2219 OFFLINE   jompaul17

jompaul17

    Supporting Actor



  • 945 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 23 2011

Posted November 04 2013 - 09:27 AM

$100 bills are still in circulation and common, and remain the largest denomination of US currency at this time.

 

The episode deals with a $1000 bill and that's a large denomination that's no longer made. Large currency denominations were once used principally by banks in their transactions with each other, but after a time, that practice was discontinued and so were the large bills.

 

The US Federal Reserve effectively withdrew these large bills back in 1969, just a few years before this MANNIX episode ("Man In A Trap"), so Joe is aware that in order to be passing around such large denominations, someone had to jump through some hoops somewhere.

 

I've not actually completed the episode, but I saw enough of it before nodding off to see the seen of Joe deducing the relative rarity of the $1000 bill as a piece of currency.

 

John McLiam played the PI who gets knocked off in the opening scene by Erik Estrada. McLiam was a character actor whose face was everywhere in television. Madlyn Rhue makes an appearance here - she who captivated the mighty Khan in STAR TREK's "Space Seed."

 

In reading through THESE ARE THE VOYAGES PART 1 about the first season of STAR TREK, I learned that Joe d'Agosta, the casting manager for Desilu came up with a scenario where he'd hire guest stars on a three-fer basis. That is, instead of paying them say $1500 for a guest shot on STAR TREK, he'd double the price and get them on three different series. So instead of the going rate, he'd actually pay them less per appearance, but guarantee them work in three different series, which explains why there are so many cross-series appearances of these actors on STAR TREK, MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE and MANNIX.

 

Harry

Harry,

 

Well, a $1000 bill makes a lot more sense than a $100 bill -- not sure what I was thinking!  

 

Yes, Peggy makes fun of the way she is paid -- but, she winds up owning her own home season 6, and we get to see its interior in a later episode ("Chance Meeting" -- one of your later posts.).  One gets the clear impression that Peggy ultimately does better, financially, by working for Joe than she would have by staying, for example, in the DMV -- and the series makes it clear that not all PIs treat their secretaries that way, or even have one in the first place.  Notice, however, that mention was also made that Joe did not pay her every week, when she first started to work for him!

 

But that is one of those structural things that make the show so brilliant.  Joe and Peggy can tease each other -- like loving adults do (loving in the sense of friendship or otherwise).   But, Joe the employer clearly treats Peggy well, even though no big deal is made of this.  It is simply there, as a part of the structure of the show -- to be inferred, not to be spelled out.

 

And, as a result of this, you get the sense that even though Peggy's husband died (a heroic death), Peggy sort of gets a life as a result.   You get the sense that she is exposed to more and experiences more by working for Joe than if she had stayed a conventional policeman's wife.  Now, of course, we do not know what would have happened to Peggy if her husband had lived -- she may have gone on to do great things.  But, a lot of people in stable situations don't tend to move from them.  The structural premise of her backstory is that she was forced into something she may not have otherwise chosen -- and something good came of it, even better, much more than the might have imagined, far more than she might have hoped for. 

 

That is a big part of the American story -- the way it used to be.   Bad things happen to people -- but, they can encounter good people, like Joe, and live fuller lives as a result.

 

Notice how we don't have that kind of backstory so much.   These days, our backstories have more to do with enmeshment and entanglements (the product of family values -- the politics of these past decades) -- stories about dealing with issues that pertain to being stuck.  This is a subtle, but important, difference in our own backstories. 

 

Then again, one could argue that there used to be more Joe Mannix types in our culture. 

 

But, of course, those types were also influenced by story. 

 

I'm absolutely fascinated by the "big three" Desilu productions of Star Trek, Mission: Impossible, and Mannix.  There were so many shared sets, behind the scenes people, and guest stars.  But, the three shows are distinctly different in gimmick.   Even the original gimmick of Mannix was distinctly different from the other two.  But, then Mannix dumped that gimmick -- and became about something else. 

 

It's difficult to point to Mannix (seasons 2-8) what its gimmick is -- its structure does not distill to a logline.  The closest we can get is that Joe Mannix is an LA-based, tough PI.  But that says so little, the younger generation will not bother.  The seek gimmicks first, and structural elements second.  And yet, Mannix' structural elements are brilliant -- rich and varied.  They include (among many other things) Peggy's backstory which involves the premise of her having a fuller life because her husband died than she might have otherwise.  She winds up helping a purely heroic type, a singular good guy, in situation after situation -- the premise that suffering and loss can lead to better things, bigger purpose.  Suffering and loss can lead to redemption.  This type of backstory is almost like heresy in today's culture.  But, it is a rich back story -- and we lose it at our peril. 

 

And, it was right there, in the background of Mannix

 

Oh, how I love this series!



#1919 of 2219 OFFLINE   jompaul17

jompaul17

    Supporting Actor



  • 945 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 23 2011

Posted November 04 2013 - 09:38 AM

You're welcome ,Dan.

 

While under the weather the last day or so, I've had a chance to catch up on a couple of MANNIX episodes. "Man In A Trap" (8.14), I finally finished, and I followed it up with "Chance Meeting" (8.15).

 

As we mentioned, "Man In A Trap" hinges on a $1000 bill found in someone's hand, and by 1975, the Fed had removed $1000 bills from circulation, so only those grandfathered in circulation were out there. Joe was astute enough to realize it - and I loved the line that Peggy said she hadn't seen a $1000 bill since her last raise!

 

The old "Don" was played by the great Peter Brocco, an unsung character actor who generally fades into the background of virtually ever series ever filmed. A few of his other roles:

 

STAR TREK

attachicon.gifJAN_PeterBroccoST2.JPG

 

ZORRO

attachicon.gifJAN_PeterBroccoZorro.JPG

 

VOYAGE TO THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA

attachicon.gifJAN_PeterBroccoVTTBOTS.JPG

 

THE OUTER LIMITS

attachicon.gifJAN_PeterBroccoOL.JPG

 

BEWITCHED

attachicon.gifJAN_PeterBroccoBW.JPG

 

TWILIGHT ZONE: THE MOVIE

attachicon.gifJAN_PeterBroccoTZTM.JPG

 

THE TIME TUNNEL

attachicon.gif15_Brocco.JPG

 

...and there were countless more, including THE FUGITIVE and at least three different episode of MANNIX, including "The Sound Of Darkness."

 

More on the next episode later.

 

Harry

Harry,

 

Unbelievable. 

 

I never connected that guy with the one in "The Sound of Darkness" before!

 

Along those lines, I recently watched the HBO Movie Muhammad Ali's Greatest Fight.  Nine Supreme Court Justices are portrayed in that movie -- and three of them are Mannix alumni: Frank Langella, Ed Begley, Jr. and Fritz Weaver.  

 

"Chance Meeting" does bring Toby back -- if I remember correctly, he went completely missing from season 7.   It also reveals the inside of Peggy's house, which was pretty interesting at the time.   She moved from being a secretary in a not too elegant apartment building (the same apartment she lived in with her husband, at least initially) to a home owner, just by working for Joe for four years (she had a house in season 6's "See No Evil," even though we do not see its interior). 

 

Considering his track record of getting shot, that was pretty gusty on her part!  

 

So, one can infer all sorts of fun stuff here -- does Joe give her some security in his will (he already gave her power of attorney)?  Does Joe's reputation reflect upon Peggy enough that she thinks she will not have problems finding another job, if anything would happen to Joe?

 

Lots of stuff behind their relationship is actually pretty darn interesting -- and it all had to be inferred, by paying attention to small scenes. 

 

But, it always remained true to character and backstory.

 

Sweet. 



#1920 of 2219 OFFLINE   jompaul17

jompaul17

    Supporting Actor



  • 945 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 23 2011

Posted November 04 2013 - 09:42 AM

Most notably, Leslie Parrish turning up in S1 and in her opening scene wearing the same Greco-costume she wore in the Trek episode "Who Mourns For Adonias."

Jack,

 

Ah, but how many people would have noticed this when these episodes first ran!

 

It makes you wonder how the producers might have treated things differently, had they ever imagined viewers would hold the entire series in the palm of their hands, with the ability to watch and re-watch.

 

But, more astounding, to me, is the level of quality these series have when the producers thought viewers would only see images in the most fleeting of ways!

 

The quality of these series well surpasses anything -- anything -- that I see today, on movies or TV.    

 

Why?







0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users