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Mannix is coming!

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#2181 of 2219 OFFLINE   jompaul17

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Posted May 29 2014 - 01:51 PM

Stephen Bowie and JoAnn Paul:

 

This debate has no doubt been a lot of work, for both of you, but I think each of you have added to our understanding and appreciation of Mannix. Thanks to both of you. For what little it may be worth, I find both of your perspectives worthy and illuminating—and probably in large part because they come from such different points of view. 

 

As a Star Trek fan, I confess that a quote from The Undiscovered Country came into my mind while I was reading your posts that may or may not be relevant. In that movie, Captain Kirk is talking with Spock, and at one point says, more or less: "We're each of us extremists. Reality is somewhere in-between." 

 

I think each of your points of view address essential elements of this classic show. For me, perhaps unrealistically, the views you express are not entirely incompatible—at least in my mind. Imho the "reality" of Mannix is probably somewhere in-between the two views that you present.

 

Anyway, thanks again for your work. And thanks also for being civil as you agree to disagree.

 

Best wishes, Ben

Ben,

 

I appreciate this.

 

For me, the difference is that I initially pointed out things, and did not get personal. 



#2182 of 2219 OFFLINE   jompaul17

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Posted May 29 2014 - 11:36 PM

As a heavyweight creative responsible for one of the hottest shows around at the time (Mission: Impossible), and the credited EP on Mannix, Bruce Geller is the only logical person to credit with the Mannix revamp.  Of course it was CBS's decision to renew or not, but the pickup was contingent on faith in Geller's strategy for fixing the show.  Moreover, that's confirmed by contemporary press accounts: "With CBS' blessing, executive producer Bruce Geller decided to ditch the computer gimmick and 'put some flesh on the characters.' To this end, Geller brought in the producer-writing team of Ivan Goff and Ben Roberts, who one time worked for him at Four Star." (Paul Henninger, "Mannix Plan Proves Man Can Defeat the Computer," Los Angeles Times, 7/15/68; emphasis added). I don't understand the counterfactual insistence on minimizing Geller's role and creating one for Ball, but hopefully that puts it to rest.

 

For the record, at the end of the second part of the Mike Connors-Joseph Campanella interview on disk 2 of season 1 of the Mannix DVDs, Mike Connors clearly states that Lucille Ball saved the series despite low ratings and threat of cancellation by CBS in season 1.

 

(I thought discussion of this might have been there -- but have been too busy to watch the DVDs these past few days.)

 

He specifically says how she liked the character, so they brought in people to fix the series.  It's an easy inference (even though I've read elsewhere that she thought people did not understand the computers) that the character is what she liked -- not the format with the computers. 

 

So the series was saved and the re-tooling was prompted because Lucille Ball wanted to see the character saved. The "Ball," so to speak, got rolling from there -- at which point Ivan Goff and Ben Roberts were brought in for consultation -- and they became the co-producers of the series for the next seven seasons.

 

MC does not state this as speculation.  He states it as something he "heard later."  The discussion of this is approximately two minutes long and is the closing part of a collection of planned comments that include behind the scenes information about the series.

 

Ignoring this, or simply deciding it is false, is absurd.   It was likely recorded in 2008.  Anyone who buys the season 1 DVDs can watch it for themselves.  

 

Bruce Geller was the EP, so he was officially in charge of production.  But it is curious that the consultation was done with a team who wound up actually producing the series -- well after Bruce Geller was banned from the Paramount lot in around 1970 (as previously discussed in this thread, with reference). 

 

Lucille Ball had gone out of her way for Mannix at least once -- as documented in the aforementioned book about Desilu.  Regardless of the exact sale date of Desulu, she had personal investment in the series -- and gee, she might have just used her considerable influence at the network for personal or artistic reasons.  What a thought!  

 

Such kinds of influence would likely not be published in a 1968 article, which would have some other story to account for why the series was so dramatically and singularly re-tooled after one season of low ratings.

 

I sure never would have ignored, or worse, vehemently gone against something that was clearly stated by the star of a 40 year old series in an archival-style interview that anyone can watch right on the DVDs.  

 

Then again, I don't like to go against Mike Connors, since he still cuts an imposing figure and he knows where I live. 



#2183 of 2219 OFFLINE   benbess

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Posted June 02 2014 - 02:21 PM

The Odds Against Donald Jordan

 

Liked this one. Mannix solved a complicated riddle with all sorts of false clues. Nice little romance with Susan Oliver, perhaps best known as the green gal in Trek's The Menagerie. What electric blue eyes she had. Joe Mantell does well as the sidekick. It was also nice to see Paul Winfield, who later went on to play many roles, including Martin Luther King Jr. in a miniseries, as was as a Captain in Trek's Wrath of Kahn. The ending was somehow touching. I liked how Mannix was trying to make things a little better with these troubled characters. I think I'd rate the episode a B+.



#2184 of 2219 OFFLINE   benbess

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Posted June 03 2014 - 05:01 PM

Last Rites for Miss Emma

 

I like how they often use real money on this show. So many shows from this era use such obviously fake money that it destroys some of the illusion. The chemistry between Peggy and Mannix was good in this episode. And it touched on one of my pet peeves of crime dramas starting about this time. Sometime in the 1970s, I think, it was decided that you should usually have white men doing the crimes. Certainly white men do commit a lot of crimes, but based on a lot of crime and detective shows from the 1980s to today it sometimes seems like c. 60-80% of all crimes are committed by white men. On TV, the bad guy role doesn't seem to be an equal opportunity profession. Ironically, in the attempt to not offend anyone and be progressive, it's ended up give a lot of good jobs to white male actors. The other pet peeve I have is how often in American dramas it's an upper class British man who is the baddie. You'd almost think that half of all plots for world domination are hatched by graduates of Oxford or Cambridge. Anyway, that's a very long-winded windup to saying that this particular episode took a different view. Sometimes it was a little awkward and strained, but ultimately I found the drama compelling. Good episode with a large role for Peggy.



#2185 of 2219 OFFLINE   benbess

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Posted June 04 2014 - 03:54 PM

The Solid Gold Web

 

Another solid episode. At this point the Mannix show seems like it was a well-oiled machine, producing good episodes nearly every single time.  This one had as a guest star Sally Kellerman, who was in the Trek episode Where No Man Has Gone Before 4 years earlier. I liked the love story and the sketch of Mannix. Seemed like some pretty jazzy cinematography. JP's idea of Mannix putting himself at risk for people because he cares even more than because of the money seems esp. true in this one. 

 

Excellent PQ with these DVDs—equal to the best of any television show I've ever seen.



#2186 of 2219 OFFLINE   Dan McW

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Posted June 18 2014 - 10:02 AM

I just finished season seven and noticed something about the opening credits. One episode--I think it was on the second or third disc--had different opening credits from the rest of them in the set. This episode had different footage in the "i" and "x" portion of the credits, which makes me think it was a true season-seven opening and that the rest of the episodes just had the season-six credits slapped on them.



#2187 of 2219 OFFLINE   davidHartzog

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Posted June 24 2014 - 06:23 AM

FYI Mike Conners fans, someone has posted a number of Tightrope episodes on Youtube.
Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown.

#2188 of 2219 OFFLINE   Wiseguy

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Posted July 01 2014 - 07:55 PM

As was mentioned on this thread before, and mostly with Mark Collins, the openings of Mannix were butchered from about 1/2 way through season 6 and into part or all of season 7 because they were combining Mannix with series like Cannon and Barnaby Jones with this black cat silhouette that wound up going into the Joe Mannix silhouette and they a very abbreviated opening of Mannix -- with the black cat supposedly serving to unite the two series into a forced, common, 2-hour entity intended to compete with the NBC Mystery Movie.    When they did this, they had no real opening for Mannix for those episodes, to the point that I remembered wondering how the heck they were going to handle the opening in syndication.

And I remember noticing, in the waning days of when Mannix aired on TV Land, which is the first I could see it there at all, that all they did was take the opening for the first part of season 6 and use it for the rest of season 6 and for those episodes of season 7 that were included in the syndication package.

As for that black cat that only Mark and I can seem to remember, in addition to feeling the pain of the butchered Mannix openings way back when, first run, I have the distinct memory of wondering how they could use a cat to suggest anything common between the likes of Joe Mannix and either Cannon or Barnaby Jones!


 

 

I remember the black cat and Mannix coming on first followed by Barnaby Jones.  I don't remember Mannix ever being associated with Cannon. A quick look at the schedules of both series over the years shows that the only time the two series even came on the same night were two months (July 75 - August 75, the last airdates for Mannix) when Cannon came on Wednesdays @ 9 followed by Mannix @ 10. 



#2189 of 2219 OFFLINE   Wiseguy

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Posted July 01 2014 - 08:14 PM

Lee,


Once again, interesting.

Curiously (check me on this), I don't think Star Trek ever used the Bonanza/Western streets of Paramount.  Mission: Impossible might have -- but I can't picture an episode right now.    But, that would be interesting if it did not, because Mission used every other part of that Paramount lot -- in the same way Mannix did.   But, if Mission never used the western streets, then Mannix would be the only of those last three Desilu--> Paramount productions to use pretty much every bit of the Paramount lot.

Mannix used that "Ghost Town" more than you might think was possible, and I wonder if screen writers weren't commissioned to use those streets and so they had to find stories that fit!

 

Mission: Impossible did indeed use the western street in one of the last episodes appropriately called "The Western." (March 2, 1973)



#2190 of 2219 OFFLINE   Wiseguy

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Posted July 01 2014 - 08:32 PM

Harry,


It's interesting that you would notice this!


Fairly recently (my email search came up with early-mid April), we were having a discussion over on the Mannix yahoo group about the score in Mannix.  Someone over there has the music notes for, I gather, both Mannix and Mission.  He is very, very into the score.   We were discussing cross-over music between Mannix and Mission -- and there isn't much.  But, that tune came up and he claimed, if memory serves, that is it called the "theme of Cinnamon Carter."   I guess he got the title from the music notes -- and they probably gave it a different name when they made the LP?

That piece of music appears in other episodes of Mannix, even s2's "The Girl Who Came In With The Tide" (it's the music playing in the bar scene).   And, there are others as well, but they slip my mind just now...

 

I noticed the "Cinnamon" song in three 3rd-season episodes:  "Return to Summer Grove," "Walk with a Dead Man" and "Who Is Sylvia?"  In addition I've noticed some tracks of the Mannix soundtrack used repeatedly such as "End of the Rainbow" in the episodes "A Sleep in the Deep," "Missing: Sun and Sky," "Who Is Sylvia?," "Only One Death to a Customer" and "Once Upon a Saturday."  The track "Hunt Down" can be heard in "A Sleep in the Deep" and "A Chance at the Roses."  "Warning: Live Blueberries" can be heard in "Missing: Sun and Sky" and "Harlequin's Gold."  "Beyond the Shadow of Today" can be heard in "Once Upon a Saturday."  All in the 3rd Season!



#2191 of 2219 OFFLINE   Wiseguy

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Posted July 02 2014 - 12:27 AM

Like I've said before, until the DVDs, the last time I saw an episode of MANNIX, it was airing on CBS. I've missed all syndicated showings, likely because at a time of airing, I didn't have access to the channel that was airing it.  I'm excluding the late-night run on ABC in the late '70s, as I can barely remember them being there. The YouTube examples kind-of refreshed my memory about that run. It's likely that I tuned in to hear the theme song and then went to bed!

Harry

I remember the syndicated airings on our local ABC affiliate.  They alternated the late-night showings with uncut episodes of Hawaii Five-0 (albeit with an extra commercial break) when programs were still syndicated uncut on film (it was up to the local station whether or not snip footage).  Mannix, of course, was syndicated pre-edited on tape, the current practice.  I was surprised (and somewhat disappointed) to see the "gridwork" eliminated from the episodes possibly due to the extra commercial break.  

 

Although I always liked Mannix, I haven't been too consistent with either the CBS or syndicated airings.  The only episode I know I saw on CBS, in syndication and on DVD was "The Mouse that Died" from Season 4, a memorable (obviously) episode.  I was too young to see the first season on CBS (I always thought the second season was the first until I later learned otherwise) and for some reason didn't care to see the late-night broadcasts on ABC (and possibly our local station didn't show it all the time) so watching the first season on DVD was a new experience. I've been watching one episode a week ever since so as not to "dilute" the experience (except for a short break halfway through the series to watch the revival of Mission: Impossible having already seen all of the original).  I'm now halfway through Season 5.

 

I usually wait for the first few seasons of a series to be released before I start collecting.  The price generally goes down somewhat and I don't have to wait for the new season to be released. So far, I've finished The Wild Wild West and both Mission: Impossible series and am in the process of watching Mannix, Hawaii Five-0 (maybe the new series as well) and Perry Mason. (Like Mannix, both Hawaii Five-0 and Perry Mason originally held back episodes from syndication although now all episodes are available. Our local FOX station shows all the Perry Mason episodes but cut down to at least 45 minutes.)

 

Is it just a coincidence all these series are from CBS/Paramount?  Basically a nostalgic trip since I've watched all these series off and on since the 1960s and 1970s.  I'm also collecting The Three Stooges Collection but that's not a drama, it's not a TV series (at least not originally) and it's from Sony so maybe it doesn't count!         



#2192 of 2219 OFFLINE   Harry-N

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Posted July 03 2014 - 05:12 AM

My MANNIX DVD-buying was detailed in the earlier parts of this thread, but I'll reiterate it here in the interest of keeping a good thread alive.

 

When I heard that MANNIX, Season One, was being released on DVD, I was really eager to get hold of it. Why? Well, it was a fondly remembered series from my young adult era. Those Saturday nights when the show premiered were part of a killer lineup on CBS and MANNIX capped it all off. The idea of him working against (or in spite of) these giant computers was appealing to me, and the show's pedigree was that it was a sister show to favorites STAR TREK and MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE.

 

So when it was announced that MANNIX was starting up on DVD, I noted the date and headed to the nearest Best Buy at lunchtime to grab a copy. I was delighted with the clean, clear presentation of this colorful show. MANNIX began as color TV was becoming a force, and was made with an eye to be colorful on those TVs of the era. And nothing was more colorful than the credits with its colored squares and rectangles, now presented with an even bolder, more colorful picture than ever on today's better televisions.

 

I watched a number of the shows on Season One, but it somehow lost its emphasis in my watching routine as other series DVDs came along to dilute my interest in MANNIX.

 

When Season Two was announced, I sort-of made a mental note to pick it up someday if I saw it, but I was concentrating on another series purchase at the time. I think it was MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE, whose later releases were concurrent with MANNIX. It was just more important for me at that time to complete my MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE collection than it was to continue with MANNIX.

 

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE was indeed a different kind of show, but one that I really enjoyed, and had regretted that it hadn't been released in the VHS and LaserDisc eras. It had been a long time since I'd seen the show and I was really enjoying seeing them all cleaned up on DVD. With the frequent releases, I had to budget my money so it was MANNIX that would have to wait.

 

Though I continued following this thread when updates were posted, I wasn't really active at all in MANNIX watching, particularly as discussions turned to Season Two and beyond.

 

Finally, MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE's Season Seven was released, and that series was essentially completed. The revival series wouldn't be out for a few more years. So it was time to perhaps concentrate on MANNIX. But by this time, I was keeping closer watch on my budget as I'd just retired, so again, MANNIX would have to wait, particularly with the semi-expensive prices that were being charged.

 

Sometime in 2011, I think, we ate breakfast at a new Denny's in the neighborhood, which was attached to a Pilot truck-stop. After breakfast, we wandered over to the truck-stop store and saw a bin of DVDs of TV series at a sale price of $14.99. My prize that day was finding Season Three of MANNIX, which I picked up and proudly placed it alongside my Season One set.

 

Looking through the episode list, I spotted "The Sound Of Darkness" where the blurb mentioned "Mannix is blinded." That was all I needed to know I wanted to revisit that episode. You see, in all of my MANNIX-watching during its run on CBS, the episode where Joe lost his sight was the only plot I recalled - the only episode out of all of the episodes made, that made enough of an impression on me that I remembered it all those years later.

 

It was just as powerful watching it on DVD as I'd remembered it, and it got me into wanting to watch more of MANNIX, so I delved back into the Season One set concurrently with watching the Season Three episodes. And those two held me for awhile. It wasn't until April of 2012, that I found a deal on Season Two on Amazon, and I ordered it to fill that annoying gap between Seasons One and Three.

 

While viewing episodes of these early seasons, I'd check into this thread every now and again and was aware of the gap between season releases. Fortunately that was all ironed out before I needed to purchase further seasons. Ultimately, I took advantage of a Deep Discount DVD sale to order three seasons at once. At the time, most MANNIX seasons were selling north of $30 and the Deep Discount price was somewhere in the $25-$27 range, so I decided to bite and bought Four, Five, and Six all at once. This was in June of 2012.

 

When I began watching Season Four, I encountered a bad first disc, and then went about fighting with Deep Discount about an exchange, which took forever. While that was in process of exchange, I watched most of Season Five, then went back to Four to finish that up, then back to the end of Five to finish THAT up.

 

Meanwhile Season Seven was being released, and I grabbed that one that July, even though I wasn't yet ready for viewing it, nor was it particularly cheap. And then Eight came along that December to conclude the series, and I added that one as it was released as well. I finally finished off that first run through the series - though it was, at best, a hopscotching pattern of viewing.

 

I think at some point in time, I will go back and attempt a straight-through viewing of all of the episodes in order. Meanwhile, this thread pops up every now and again and keeps the subject of MANNIX at the fore.

 

Harry


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A fugitive moves on, through anguished tunnels of time, down dim streets, into dark corners. And each new day offers fear and frustration, tastes of honey and hemlock. But if there is a hazard, there is also hope. - Closing narration to THE FUGITIVE, "Death Is The Door Prize".

#2193 of 2219 OFFLINE   Wiseguy

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Posted July 11 2014 - 07:30 AM

Don't know if this has already been mentioned, but as I was recently looking through Kmart's inexpensive DVDs I came across the Here's Lucy Best of Collection which featured 7 episodes.  The first thing I thought of was the Mannix episode but thought it unlikely it would be included here but was surprised to see it was indeed one of the 7 episodes so I picked it up for $5.  For those who want the episode but would rather not buy the entire 4th season of Here's Lucy this would be an alternative.

 

Some oddities:

 

...The set is released by MPI Home Video not CBS/Paramount.

...The first episode has the actual 1968-69 Paramount logo. The Paramount logo is not featured in any other episode.  This episode also mentions Desilu in the copyright notice even though it was broadcast in 1969.

...The Mannix episode has a copyright date of 1969.  Don't know if these are the original copyright notices or "recreated" for the DVD.  Someone may have transposed the last two letters of the Roman numeral: MCMLXIX instead of the correct MCMLXXI.

...The final 4 episodes feature a Warner Bros. distribution logo at the end. 

 



#2194 of 2219 OFFLINE   Harry-N

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Posted July 25 2014 - 04:26 AM

I finally watched that HERE'S LUCY episode on Hulu, and it was fun. It's not something I feel I need to own though - a little of latter-day Lucy goes a long way. What was interesting was the set used for Mannix' office. They sort of got the window behind the desk looking fairly similar, but the door off to the side was way off. I wonder if Joe's office set was being used for some dictator on MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE that week, so they had to do a re-create.

 

On another old matter, long ago we discussed a music group appearing on MANNIX "recording" in the studio. It was in the second season episode "Who Will Dig The Graves?" The group was The Peppermint Trolley, and I'd mentioned that I was familiar with the song, called "Trust" from the rare A&M Records album by the composer, Roger Nichols & The Small Circle Of Friends. Someone's posted the section of the song performance on MANNIX from a tape from TV Land:

 

 

What's even more interesting is that this group is reportedly the ones that recorded the theme for THE LOVE BOAT and - wait for it - THE BRADY BUNCH! Yet another connection between MANNIX and THE BRADY BUNCH.

 

The album from which this song comes had been released on CD:

 

http://www.amazon.co.../dp/B001T46TPG/

 

Or if you prefer MP3s:

 

http://www.amazon.co.../dp/B002ANB14Y/ where you can just grab the single "Trust".

 

Harry


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A fugitive moves on, through anguished tunnels of time, down dim streets, into dark corners. And each new day offers fear and frustration, tastes of honey and hemlock. But if there is a hazard, there is also hope. - Closing narration to THE FUGITIVE, "Death Is The Door Prize".

#2195 of 2219 OFFLINE   Dan McW

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Posted August 18 2014 - 01:49 PM

Count me as a member of the Mannix eight-season club. I just watched "Hardball" last night to finish off the series. Thanks to JoAnn, Harry, and others in this thread for making the Mannix experience even more enjoyable.



#2196 of 2219 OFFLINE   Harry-N

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Posted November 06 2014 - 05:18 AM

For anyone on the fence regarding MANNIX, someone on YouTube named "Mannix Full Episodes" has uploaded some complete episodes. They're not the best quality, but if you've never seen an episode, it's a good way to sample a few.

 

https://www.youtube....MannixClassicTV

 

Harry


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A fugitive moves on, through anguished tunnels of time, down dim streets, into dark corners. And each new day offers fear and frustration, tastes of honey and hemlock. But if there is a hazard, there is also hope. - Closing narration to THE FUGITIVE, "Death Is The Door Prize".

#2197 of 2219 OFFLINE   JMas

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Posted November 06 2014 - 06:25 AM

I have been recording The Millionaire from the new Heroes & Icons channel.  They recently showed a 1956 episode called The Victor Volante Story starring Touch Connors.



#2198 of 2219 OFFLINE   jompaul17

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Posted November 07 2014 - 05:25 PM

Some may have noticed I've been away for awhile as the "unofficial hostess" of this thread. For those who care, it was yet another time I had planned to permanently leave the HTF, something like the second or third time, over the years.  

 

I'm used to being alone in my profession -- far more than most people can even imagine, because being by yourself is not the same thing as being alone. You are most alone when you are of your own opinion, in the midst of the crowd. 

 

This is probably my favorite quote of all time:

 

"It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion; it is easy in solitude to live after our own; but the great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude.”  -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

I wrote And Now, Back to Mannix because I knew I would not always be as connected to the themes therein as when I was writing that book. Probably no one is during all of their lives, even real heroes. That is why storied heroes who struggle are so valuable and powerful. That is why, in a real sense, I wrote the book for myself -- which is perhaps the best reason for anyone to write a book.

 

After devoting my life to helping my parents live as graceful lives as possible under circumstances so extreme they probably warrant another book, each of my parents died, in 2012 and then 2013.  After my mother died, I kept going in no small part just to see that book published -- I had it to look forward to, which was a great help.  But, after the book was published, the full measure of grief set in. When that happens, the pettiness of some members of the HTF seems all the worse, because one of the few pleasurable remaining things turns into something painful.

 

Under normal circumstances, those who make "is it more the result of stupidity or meanness?" tantamount to an interesting philosophical question would not get to me so much.  But, when the grieving process covers the full measure of a life, everything gets to a person. 

 

If I didn't know both sides, the side that is affected by nasty and/or narrow people as well as the side that understands that people act out largely because they are trying to hide their own awareness of their own limitations, I could never have written the book in the first place. To the extent that book has insight, it is because I know both sides.

 

Some heroes help us to understand the meaning behind that Ralph Waldo Emerson quote, because they embody it for us, thereby making an imprint on our minds. One reason that particular quote is so wonderful and so powerful is because it acknowledges both sides.  

 

I'm thankful that I understood, at least to some extent, the meaning behind that quote because when I was growing up there was once a prime-time TV series called, Mannix.   

 

Would that more people understood, valued and embodied that Ralph Waldo Emerson quote.  

 

I believe we once did, more than we do now. And all of our lives were better for it, because there was something more alive in us then than in this age of blissfully ignorant conformity.  



#2199 of 2219 OFFLINE   jompaul17

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Posted November 07 2014 - 05:29 PM

The Odds Against Donald Jordan

 

Liked this one. Mannix solved a complicated riddle with all sorts of false clues. Nice little romance with Susan Oliver, perhaps best known as the green gal in Trek's The Menagerie. What electric blue eyes she had. Joe Mantell does well as the sidekick. It was also nice to see Paul Winfield, who later went on to play many roles, including Martin Luther King Jr. in a miniseries, as was as a Captain in Trek's Wrath of Kahn. The ending was somehow touching. I liked how Mannix was trying to make things a little better with these troubled characters. I think I'd rate the episode a B+.

Ben,

 

This is also an episode that held one of those classic Mannix-one liners that went against convention on race. At one point Joe says to the Paul Winfield character "a little heavy on the racial overtones."  And, of course, that character is hiding behind race -- using the excuse of racial bias to hide his buddy's gambling problem.  In addition, at the end Joe accuses all of them of being enablers to the gambling. 

 

How far ahead of its time was all of that?


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#2200 of 2219 OFFLINE   jompaul17

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Posted November 07 2014 - 05:39 PM

Last Rites for Miss Emma

 

I like how they often use real money on this show. So many shows from this era use such obviously fake money that it destroys some of the illusion. The chemistry between Peggy and Mannix was good in this episode. And it touched on one of my pet peeves of crime dramas starting about this time. Sometime in the 1970s, I think, it was decided that you should usually have white men doing the crimes. Certainly white men do commit a lot of crimes, but based on a lot of crime and detective shows from the 1980s to today it sometimes seems like c. 60-80% of all crimes are committed by white men. On TV, the bad guy role doesn't seem to be an equal opportunity profession. Ironically, in the attempt to not offend anyone and be progressive, it's ended up give a lot of good jobs to white male actors. The other pet peeve I have is how often in American dramas it's an upper class British man who is the baddie. You'd almost think that half of all plots for world domination are hatched by graduates of Oxford or Cambridge. Anyway, that's a very long-winded windup to saying that this particular episode took a different view. Sometimes it was a little awkward and strained, but ultimately I found the drama compelling. Good episode with a large role for Peggy.

Ben,

 

This episode has the powerful scene where Peggy accuses Joe of racism, right in her own apartment, and Joe just grabs her by the arm and glares at her. This episode aired in early 1969!  And, again, like so many things in Mannix, this scene is so brief -- if you're not paying attention, you miss it.

 

How many series would have turned their conflict into an entire episode?  Here, it took place in the seamless context of the crime Joe was trying to solve -- the brief moment that outweighed what the story was supposed to be about.

 

Think this was by accident?

 

Turns out, there are lots of promotional photos out there for this episode, unlike other episodes of that time.  

 

I also love the way Joe reveals that Peggy's love interest is for the baddie via that dictation in her apartment -- and the way he horns in on what he knows could well have been a romantic evening.  That's pure guts combined with class.  

 

If you pay further attention, there is lots of nuance to MC's acting in this scene -- look at his facial expression the whole time and even his hand movements.

 

As far as the Brit being the baddie, well, especially in the twentieth century, nothing symbolized hierarchy and the quest for world domination quite so well as an upper-class Brit!   

 

And, keep in mind, TV series were not recorded in those days -- they had to rely upon stereotype, to some extent, to tell stories in a short period of time.  That's no defense -- I just described how much I love Mannix for the nuance and the way it went against stereotype.  But, that is the reason for the common short-cut.  


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