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Are Overscan and high red color levels still a problem with new tvs?


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#1 of 6 Guest_DAN NEIR_*

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Posted August 06 2007 - 10:11 AM

I recently went high def w/ blu ray and am planning to upgrade my set. I currently own a 46in Mitsubishi that only supports 1080i w/ component inputs. I remember that when I bought the set(around 2000 I believe) I eventually had to figure out how to get into the service menus to fix the overscan problem the tv had. I also had a problem as red levels were too high when adjusting the color properly with Avia. I had to correct that problem w/ an attenuator from Radio Shack attached to the red component input.
I want a new set that supports 1080p, hopefully between 60 and 70in. Are the above problems still going to be something I'll have to deal w/ regarding the new set? Last time I was lucky to get info on the sevice menus and the color problem was fixed w/ the components, will it be correctable w/ an hdmi input?

#2 of 6 Patrick Sun

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Posted August 06 2007 - 10:22 AM

Considering HDMI is passing digital info from the source to the TV, chances are you'll need to do the tweaking on the TV side, and nowhere near the HDMI side.
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#3 of 6 Guest_DAN NEIR_*

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Posted August 06 2007 - 10:57 AM

I was able to tweak last time because I was able to isolate just the red signal from the component inputs but with the entire thing being sent via HDMI I'm wondering if there will be a problem on the tv end.
And does anyone know about the possible overscan problem?

#4 of 6 Joseph DeMartino

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Posted August 06 2007 - 01:58 PM

It depends on the technology you're using. I don't think overscan is an issue, or much of one, on flat panels or most microsdisplays. And most of them seem to have user controls to adjust more things than the old CRT-RP sets ever did. There is no "red push" on color-wheel systems like DLP, or on color-panel sets like RP LCD or LCoS, as far as I know.

Unless you're going for one of the handful of CRT-RP HD sets still on the market - or maybe looking into CRT-FP, which I really know nothing about - I don't think you're going to have to worry much about either of those things.

Regards,

Joe

#5 of 6 Patrick Sun

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Posted August 06 2007 - 02:17 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by DAN NEIR
I was able to tweak last time because I was able to isolate just the red signal from the component inputs but with the entire thing being sent via HDMI I'm wondering if there will be a problem on the tv end.
And does anyone know about the possible overscan problem?

Believe me, I used to use a RP CRT HDTV set as my primary TV, and I also had one of those red-push antenuators on the red component input to fix the red-push issue. It's not a problem on the new sets.

Now, you may encounter some geometry issues on the LCoS sets if you watch 4x3 material, and the black sidebar will give you a framing of the picture that looks slightly trapezoidal, and not totally rectangular. Flatscreens don't have this issue if they are operating properly due to their fixed pixel display.

You'll have to deal with viewing angle (flatscreens offer better viewing angles, over RP LCoC/DLP sets) and glare. Personally I went with a plasma flatscreen because I don't like the silkscreen effect (SSE) I see with RP LCoS/DLP sets' screens, but it doesn't bother other people who want a big picture size for the price, and can tolerate the SSE and lesser viewing angles and inevitable bulb replacements.
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#6 of 6 ChrisWiggles

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Posted August 07 2007 - 02:29 PM

Sadly, wrong color decoding has not gone away. Overscan is less severe of a problem, but may still be an issue on many consumer displays.

Quote:
Unless you're going for one of the handful of CRT-RP HD sets still on the market - or maybe looking into CRT-FP,

Just FYI, FP CRT is a very different animal in these regards, and overscan is completely determined by the installation and setup, so unless you purposefully want to overscan and set it up that way, there should be none. And further, because power supply stability on FP is usually significantly better than most consumer CRT displays (being professional/commercial displays), the need for some overscan is essentially eliminated because geometry stability against APL is excellent. CRT FPs also usually do not have any component inputs, so there isn't any color decoding going on, so red push or other color decoding problems are not a valid concern, since it is not within the realm of anything the display is doing. Usually they're just fed RGB, so it depends entirely on what is feeding the display and what it's doing.





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