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THE BOWERY BOYS on DVD: continuing discussion of Warner's eventual release plans (NEW UPDATE 10/2 Post #801)

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#1041 of 1252 Joe Karlosi

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Posted April 16 2013 - 02:27 AM

Got my set yesterday and the first thing I did was watch BOWERY BOYS MEET THE MONSTERS! Very gratifying to be able to watch this in 'widescreen' OAR for the first time! I thought the print looked and sounded good, probably the best I've ever seen it. There was one (brief) slight imperfection I noted during the sequence where the butler drinks a formula which winds up transforming him into a "Mr Hyde-like" creature... to the right area of the screen there was a faint spot that kind of ran repeatedly up the side, but it was only there for a minute or so during this scene. (Obviously it's not that intrusive as Ron did not notice it).

 

Checking the play side of all my discs, they're all "pressed" (yay!!) but one of them looks slightly "stained". Have you ever noticed this sometimes, when the surface looks like there's an uneven "blotch" or "spill" on it (sometimes called a "coffee stain")? It might not even be worth mentioning yet because I haven't played it and sometimes a blemish like that does not affect the playing. 



#1042 of 1252 Robert Crawford

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Posted April 16 2013 - 02:30 AM

Private Eyes is Academy ratio on this set.  Looks like the WAC does the widescreen switch later down the line.

Some comments about that issue in this page of the Aspect Ratio thread.

 

http://www.hometheat...search/page-106


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#1043 of 1252 Robert Crawford

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Posted April 16 2013 - 02:31 AM

I got my boxset yesterday, but haven't open it yet.  Will do so today as I want to watch my favorite Bowery Boys film "Smugglers Cove" then perhaps Meet the Monsters.


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#1044 of 1252 Ronald Epstein

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Posted April 16 2013 - 11:05 AM

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#1045 of 1252 JeffT.

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Posted April 16 2013 - 11:25 AM

It sounds very much like PRIVATE EYES (1953) is standard screen. Is HIGH SOCIETY (1955) widescreen?

Joe mentions the part at the beginning of THE BOWERY BOYS MEETS THE MONSTERS (1954) were Grissom (Paul Wexler) the Addams Family-like butler changes into a Mr. Hyde-like monster. This has always been missing from the syndicated tv prints cut down to fit an hour timeslot.

Anyway this is yet another batch of good films well worth looking forward to.

I somehow suspect that starting in the third volume there will (definitely) be some Stanley Clements titles included.

Jeff T.

#1046 of 1252 Joe Karlosi

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Posted April 16 2013 - 12:10 PM

Yes, HIGH SOCIETY is presented Widescreen on this set.



#1047 of 1252 Ronald Epstein

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Posted April 16 2013 - 12:34 PM

Joe mentions the part at the beginning of THE BOWERY BOYS MEETS THE MONSTERS (1954) were Grissom (Paul Wexler) the Addams Family-like butler changes into a Mr. Hyde-like monster. This has always been missing from the syndicated tv prints cut down to fit an hour timeslot.

Yepper, it's intact.


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#1048 of 1252 JeffT.

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Posted April 16 2013 - 01:13 PM

When I received the first set I (actually) watched each film as presented without jumping around.  I find that I enjoy all The Bowery Boys films so (at least in my case) it's easy for me to do that.

 

This set (once again) has some nice titles SPOOK BUSTERS (1946), BOWERY BUCKEROOS (1947) marking Bobby Jordan's final appearance in the series, HARD BOILED MAHONEY (1947) with veteran character actor Dan Seymour ("What is this 'Routine Eleven' you speak of?"), GHOST CATCHERS (1951), LET'S GO NAVY! (1951), HOLD THAT LINE (1952), PRIVATE EYES (1953) and of course THE BOWERY BOYS MEET THE MONSTERS (1954). 

 

The illusive MR. HEX (1946) is still errant!

 

Why is there no mention of "widescreen" on any of the original poster advertising for the latter produced films in the series?  Was this by now standard format for all films?

 

Thank you gentlemen for your much appreciated responses.

 

Jeff T.  

 

:D



#1049 of 1252 Robert Crawford

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Posted April 17 2013 - 01:49 AM

I viewed Smuggler's Cove and Meet the Monsters yesterday.  I thought both looked very good considering the film element conditions.  I'm going to try to view Bowery Buckeroos and Hard Boiled Mahoney later this week.


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#1050 of 1252 Tony Bensley

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Posted April 17 2013 - 07:57 AM

I think THE BOWERY BOYS MEET THE MONSTERS may have been their first widescreen effort. It is listed as 1.85:1 by imdb.

 

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Edited by Tony Bensley, April 17 2013 - 08:00 AM.


#1051 of 1252 JoHud

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Posted April 17 2013 - 09:09 AM

When I received the first set I (actually) watched each film as presented without jumping around.  I find that I enjoy all The Bowery Boys films so (at least in my case) it's easy for me to do that.

I've been doing that as well.  However, that's because I was new to the Bowery Boys before Vol. 1 came out and therefore had no personal favorites.  So far, I share your sentiments and find enjoyment in all of them too.

 

I think THE BOWERY BOYS MEET THE MONSTERS may have been their first widescreen effort. It is listed as 1.85:1 by imdb.

 

CHEERS!

 

Technically Private Eyes was and Meet the Monsters was the third, but I think the WAC made the right call as it apparently wasn't intended for widescreen presentation before shooting started.  I'm pretty sure the next one, Paris Playboys, will be presented in widescreen.



#1052 of 1252 Randy Korstick

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Posted April 17 2013 - 10:51 AM

Bowery Buckeroos has always been very dark, like a night for day filter was on for day scenes in all previous TV prints and the VHS release. Hopefully this has been corrected or at least improved on this release.

I viewed Smuggler's Cove and Meet the Monsters yesterday.  I thought both looked very good considering the film element conditions.  I'm going to try to view Bowery Buckeroos and Hard Boiled Mahoney later this week.


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#1053 of 1252 JeffT.

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Posted April 17 2013 - 11:42 AM

When viewing these films I set aside a (late) afternoon or evening usually on a Saturday and watch three-at-a-time (which translates to one disc).  So in four weeks I have completed the set.

 

It will be tough going heading toward the homestretch when Louie (Bernard Gorcey), Butch (Benny Bartlett) and even Slip (Leo Gorcey) himself all drop out of the series.  It is unfortunate that everyone couldn't have stayed to the very end but I guess it just wasn't meant to be and their personal lives were just too tumultuous to permit that.

 

It sounds like PRIVATE EYES (1953) started off in the regular screen format and midway while still in production it was decided to adapt to the new widescreen medium.  I am looking forward to seeing both THE BOWERY BOYS MEET THE MONSTERS (1954) and HIGH SOCIETY (1955) in widescreen.

 

Anyway keep on watching and enjoying those (The) Bowery Boys DVDs!

 

Jeff T.

 

:D



#1054 of 1252 Tony Bensley

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Posted April 17 2013 - 12:30 PM

I find it interesting that studios made the change from academy ratio to widescreen in the middle of film productions. In my opinion, the decision to transfer PRIVATE EYES in the academy ratio was the right one.Truth be told, as I've stated previously, I am 50/50 regarding the academy matte/widescreen titles for the reason that, while they were originally presented in 1.85:1 ratio for the theaters, some cropping (However much care was taken to retain all meaningful images!) was done to achieve this. An academy ratio presentation would have allowed those with 16 x 9 (Which is exactly equivalent to 1.85:1) screens to choose how to view these titles, thus satisfying all preferences! 

 

With that said, I greatly look forward to viewing THE BOWERY BOYS MEET THE MONSTERS, along with the other Bowery Boys, Volume 2 titles!

 

CHEERS!



#1055 of 1252 JoHud

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Posted April 17 2013 - 09:57 PM

I noticed a few moments that seem cribbed from Edward Bernds' earlier work on the Three Stooges.  Private Eyes, for instance, gives a good amount of screen time to Emil Sitka despite his name to even appearing in the opening credits.  No doubt his relationship with Bernds factored in.  Also, The Bowery Boys Meet the Monsters has a sequence with a gorilla that is almost directly lifted from the very similar sequence in Crime on Their Hands, where Moe and Larry saw into the gorilla's caged pen, stab it in the rear end with the saw, and Moe shoving Larry into the pen repeatedly despite Larry's constant state of fear.  In addition, the sequence where Slip is tied onto the operating table at the mercy of a gorilla with a scalpel in his hand is also very reminiscent of the same sequence in Crime on their Hands where Shemp is on the operating table.

 

Also, the whole sideplot in the same film where Dr. Derek Gravesend (John Dehner) discovers that Sach's brain is perfect enough (rather, puny enough) for his experiment to transplant it into the cranium of an ape is reminiscent of the Bernds' directed A Bird in the Head in which Curly was the "perfect specimen."  Of course this very similar subplot was used in the 1946 Bowery Boys film Spook Busters, so it's less clear if Bernds was using Three Stooges inspiration here or if it was loosely cribbed from Spook Busters.  Most conspicuously, Spook Busters was released a mere 6 months after A Bird in the Head so it's quite possible there was a bit of minor plagiarism from the earlier Stooges effort.


Edited by JoHud, April 17 2013 - 09:59 PM.


#1056 of 1252 Joe Karlosi

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Posted April 18 2013 - 02:50 AM

I think you're correct, JoHud. I have always noticed this, and it's my view that the reason BOWERY BOYS MEET THE MONSTERS is a stand-out film in this series (some say it's "their masterpiece") is because it takes elements from the Three Stooges films. The movie was not only directed by Stooge directors Edward Bernds, it was also written by Bernds and Stooges writer Elwood Ullman. 



#1057 of 1252 Robert Crawford

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Posted April 18 2013 - 03:17 AM

I noticed a few moments that seem cribbed from Edward Bernds' earlier work on the Three Stooges.  Private Eyes, for instance, gives a good amount of screen time to Emil Sitka despite his name to even appearing in the opening credits.  No doubt his relationship with Bernds factored in.  Also, The Bowery Boys Meet the Monsters has a sequence with a gorilla that is almost directly lifted from the very similar sequence in Crime on Their Hands, where Moe and Larry saw into the gorilla's caged pen, stab it in the rear end with the saw, and Moe shoving Larry into the pen repeatedly despite Larry's constant state of fear.  In addition, the sequence where Slip is tied onto the operating table at the mercy of a gorilla with a scalpel in his hand is also very reminiscent of the same sequence in Crime on their Hands where Shemp is on the operating table.

 

Also, the whole sideplot in the same film where Dr. Derek Gravesend (John Dehner) discovers that Sach's brain is perfect enough (rather, puny enough) for his experiment to transplant it into the cranium of an ape is reminiscent of the Bernds' directed A Bird in the Head in which Curly was the "perfect specimen."  Of course this very similar subplot was used in the 1946 Bowery Boys film Spook Busters, so it's less clear if Bernds was using Three Stooges inspiration here or if it was loosely cribbed from Spook Busters.  Most conspicuously, Spook Busters was released a mere 6 months after A Bird in the Head so it's quite possible there was a bit of minor plagiarism from the earlier Stooges effort.

I wouldn't call it plagiarism if the writer is using his own work again or the original writer is given screen credit on the later film.


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#1058 of 1252 Robert Crawford

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Posted April 18 2013 - 03:18 AM

I think you're correct, JoHud. I have always noticed this, and it's my view that the reason BOWERY BOYS MEET THE MONSTERS is a stand-out film in this series (some say it's "their masterpiece") is because it takes elements from the Three Stooges films. The movie was not only directed by Stooge directors Edward Bernds, it was also written by Bernds and Stooges writer Elwood Ullman. 

Right!


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#1059 of 1252 JeffT.

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Posted April 18 2013 - 06:57 AM

The idea of a mad scientist needing a human head (or brain) for his "mechanical man" originated in THE THREE STOOGES short "Dopey Dicks" (02/03/1950) written by Elwood Ullman and directed by Edward Bernds.

The humour that I really like in THE BOWERY BOYS MEET THE MONSTERS (1954) are the subtle clever embellishments like the "double-necked knitted woollen sweater" which is pure Charles Addams.

If one thinks about it Slip (Leo Gorcey) is a Moe-like personification and Sach (Huntz Hall) is a Curly-Larry amalgamation.

In an interview Edward Bernds confided that he didn't especially enjoy working with Leo Gorcey and Huntz Hall ("The Boys") finding them increasingly "difficult to handle."

Whatever problems that there were on the set none of it (thankfully) shows up on screen.

Allied Artists probably hired (no nonsense) Mr. Bernds because of his background in filmed comedy and could rely upon the gentleman to keep things well under control.

Generally Edward Bernds enjoyed his association with The Three Stooges albeit he wasn't particularly appreciative of Curly (who was in sad physical decline at the time).  Mr. Bernds did think highly of Shemp Howard however.

 

Incidentally, Huntz Hall was a close personal friend of Shemp and attended his good friend's funeral.

Jeff T.


Edited by JeffT., April 18 2013 - 02:27 PM.


#1060 of 1252 JoHud

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Posted April 18 2013 - 12:36 PM

I wouldn't call it plagiarism if the writer is using his own work again or the original writer is given screen credit on the later film.

Sorry, poor choice of words on my part.  You're absolutely right.







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