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PEPE on TCM on 2/19.


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30 replies to this topic

#1 of 31 OFFLINE   Charles H

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Posted February 13 2007 - 08:31 AM

The potential release of PEPE (1960) on dvd was under discussion on HTF a couple of years ago. A letterboxed 195-minute version is being shown beginning at 9:45 am. It appears to be getting more respect from Sony than MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD, and I wonder if trotting it out on TCM indicates a dvd release in the future. Can a release of a restored print of the musical version of LOST HORIZON be far behind?
Charles Hoyt

#2 of 31 OFFLINE   Joe Lugoff

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Posted February 13 2007 - 11:41 AM

PEPE was one of those long roadshows that was cut for general release.

At first, TCM's schedule showed it in a 3-hour slot --- it was recently changed to a 3-hour, 15-minute slot, so it looks like it'll be the whole movie. It's probably the longest movie with the shortest plot of all time. Pepe looks for his horse for three hours and fifteen minutes.

#3 of 31 OFFLINE   Greg_M

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Posted February 13 2007 - 02:30 PM

Never saw it, (Pepe) don't get TMC, but like to have "Lost Horizon" don't know why it hasn't been released to DVD, it got a good response when screened in LA a few years ago, Sony executives were in attendance.

#4 of 31 OFFLINE   Matt Hough

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Posted February 13 2007 - 03:55 PM

I saw it many years ago and thought it terrible (though there were some interesting sequences). I did buy the soundtrack LP which was a collector's item for many years.

I certainly intend to watch/record it when it comes around. My memory is too foggy about the film not to give it another chance.

#5 of 31 OFFLINE   Bob Graham

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Posted February 14 2007 - 04:38 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Lugoff
It's probably the longest movie with the shortest plot of all time. Pepe looks for his horse for three hours and fifteen minutes.


Correction, Joe. Pepe looks for his donkey for three hours and fifteen minutes.

#6 of 31 OFFLINE   Ken Koc

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Posted February 14 2007 - 05:05 AM

If anyone could record it on DVD for me I would be eternally gratefull!!! It is a very much loved "guilty pleasure" for me!
Ken

#7 of 31 OFFLINE   Thomas T

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Posted February 14 2007 - 06:05 AM

No, Cantinflas doesn't look at his donkey for 3 1/2 hours! He also looks at Kim Novak, Tony Curtis, Janet Leigh, Edward G. Robinson, Donna Reed, Dan Dailey, Shirley Jones, Jack Lemmon, Debbie Reynolds, Bing Crosby, Greer Garson among many many actors making cameo appearances in the film.

#8 of 31 OFFLINE   serenapowell

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Posted February 14 2007 - 06:45 AM

TCM has conditioned me to prefer those snappy, fast-paced B-movies that only last 60-80 minutes. Posted Image But with a cast like that, I'll gladly sit through PEPE, and I'd definitely buy the DVD!

#9 of 31 OFFLINE   Darren Gross

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Posted February 14 2007 - 07:08 AM

Plus, you get JACK LEMMON playing JACK LEMMON while shooting SOME LIKE IT HOT, running off to an appointment in drag.

The film's full of fun cinematic footnotes. Kind of endless, but the cameos give it moments of spark.

#10 of 31 OFFLINE   Richard Gallagher

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Posted February 14 2007 - 05:49 PM

Maltin calls it "incredibly long and pointless."

Trivia note: a recording of the theme song was done by Duane Eddy. It was in the Top 40 for seven weeks and peaked at #18 in January, 1961. It is not the version which appears in the film.
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#11 of 31 OFFLINE   Thomas T

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Posted February 14 2007 - 06:35 PM

re: "Maltin calls it incredibly long and pointless"

Does anybody take a hack like Maltin seriously anymore? Isn't he the movie reviewer equivalent of industry TV tabloids like Entertainment Tonight or The Insider and their ilk? In fact, isn't he an employee of one of those shows?

#12 of 31 OFFLINE   Joe Lugoff

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Posted February 15 2007 - 01:55 AM

It's impossible to take Maltin seriously. Huge numbers of movies in his book were obviously not reviewed by anyone, because no one has seen them in decades. He just slapped a **1/2 rating on them and said something vague like, "Average Western."

#13 of 31 OFFLINE   MatthewA

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Posted February 15 2007 - 01:59 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas T
re: "Maltin calls it incredibly long and pointless"

Does anybody take a hack like Maltin seriously anymore?

Does anyone take ANY film reviewer seriously anymore? I know I surely do not.

Enough is enough, Disney. No more evasions or excuses. We DEMAND the release Song of the South on Blu-ray along with the uncut version of Bedknobs and Broomsticks on Blu-ray. I am going to boycott The Walt Disney Company until then.


#14 of 31 OFFLINE   Rob_Ray

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Posted February 15 2007 - 02:57 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Gallagher
Maltin calls it "incredibly long and pointless."

It may have seemed long and pointless in 1960, but I think critics were missing the point entirely. The admittedly stupid plot was merely an excuse to hang all the wonderful cameos and today it's the only opportunity to see things such as Maurice Chevalier's Las Vegas nightclub act, along with appearances by now-iconic performers from an age of entertainment which we'll never see again.

Pepe will never be a great movie as a movie, but as a record of 20th Century performance art, it's a minor classic and not all that inferior to another overlong cameo-laden opus that won the Best Picture Oscar, Around the World in Eighty Days. To me, it's a not-so-guilty pleasure and I hope it gets a DVD release soon.

#15 of 31 OFFLINE   ChristopherDAC

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Posted February 15 2007 - 09:36 AM

Quote:
The admittedly stupid plot was merely an excuse to hang all the wonderful cameos
The studios used to do things like that all the time. The Broadway Melody of 1930, Grand Hotel, and similar productions were little more than an excuse to trot out their stables of stars. Pepe must be one of the longest of the genre, as well as one of the last (Mel Brooks' Silent Movie is something of the same kind).

#16 of 31 OFFLINE   Rob_Ray

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Posted February 15 2007 - 09:48 AM

What I like about Pepe as opposed to Around the World or It's a MMMMM World is that the people making cameos actually got a chance to really *do* something, rather than merely show up so we could say "there's so-and-so!" The stars featured in Pepe actually 5-10 minutes to show why they were stars in the first place.

#17 of 31 OFFLINE   Richard Gallagher

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Posted February 15 2007 - 09:49 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob_Ray
It may have seemed long and pointless in 1960, but I think critics were missing the point entirely. The admittedly stupid plot was merely an excuse to hang all the wonderful cameos and today it's the only opportunity to see things such as Maurice Chevalier's Las Vegas nightclub act, along with appearances by now-iconic performers from an age of entertainment which we'll never see again.

Pepe will never be a great movie as a movie, but as a record of 20th Century performance art, it's a minor classic and not all that inferior to another overlong cameo-laden opus that won the Best Picture Oscar, Around the World in Eighty Days. To me, it's a not-so-guilty pleasure and I hope it gets a DVD release soon.

Don't get me wrong, I plan to Tivo it. But 195 minutes kind of takes my breath away!
Rich Gallagher

#18 of 31 OFFLINE   Mark B

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Posted February 15 2007 - 12:48 PM

My favorite part is in the nightclub with Bobby Darin, which leads into the WEST SIDE STORY influenced sequence with Shirley Jones. It's funny, for a self-professed non-dancer, she does an admirable job on that one and the dance with Dan Dailey.

#19 of 31 OFFLINE   Darren Gross

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Posted February 16 2007 - 08:25 AM

All the songs are another reason its a must-record. I highly doubt Sony is going to by the expensive music rights for Pepe in order to put it on DVD. Tape it while you can.

#20 of 31 OFFLINE   Joe Lugoff

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Posted February 16 2007 - 11:30 AM

I don't quite understand music rights. Does TCM have to pay for any kind of music rights to show the movie?


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