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HTF REVIEW: James Bond Ultimate Edition Vol. 3



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#1 of 7 Cameron Yee

Cameron Yee

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Posted January 12 2007 - 12:54 PM

[img]http://static.hometheaterforum.com/imgrepo/d/dd/ronsreviews_covers_76715.jpg">

James Bond Ultimate Edition Vol. 3
Release Date: December 12, 2006
Studio: MGM Studios
Menus: Animated
Packaging/Materials: Two-disc slim cases housed in a cardboard slipcase; six-page booklets for each title
MSRP: $89.98

Overall Score: 4/5
Though the box set is not without its flaws and there is spirited debate about some of the framing and color choices on some titles (see this thread to learn more), it's hard not to recommend the release overall, especially for someone who does not own the previous versions. The DVDs and their packaging are nicely designed, there is an abundance of good to excellent special features, and picture and sound quality are on the whole quite impressive. Though the ]
Continue reading for specifics on each title. To jump to a particular title, use the links below:

    [*]From Russia With Love
    [*]On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    [*]Live and Let Die
    [*]For Your Eyes Only
    [*]GoldenEye





From Russia With Love
Year: 1963
Rating: PG
Running Time: 1h51m
Video: 1.66:1 anamorphic
Audio: English DTS Surround, English 5.1 Dolby Surround, English Mono, French 5.1 Dolby Surround
Subtitles: English, French, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese, Korean, Thai
TV-Generated Closed Captions: English

The Feature: 4/5
James Bond (Sean Connery) is tasked to rendezvous with a female Soviet agent (Daniela Bianchi) who may want to defect and provide MI6 with a Lektor decoding machine. Unbeknownst to her (and Bond) she is being manipulated by Ernst Blofeld and his SPECTRE organization.


Video Quality: 4.5/5
- no edge halos evident
- good black levels and contrast
- remarkable detail and texture
- occasionally soft but may be source material (e.g. the tracking shots in the mosque)
- no signs of damage, dirt or dust but noticed one instance of a couple dropped frames


Audio Quality: 4/5
- DTS and DD5.1 tracks largely front and center speaker activity, with DTS track sounding more expansive
- original mono track will please the purists and on the whole sounds more natural and less strained with the music soundtrack
- nevertheless, surround activity is generally judicious and effective during explosions, fly overs, and within the train compartment
- few, if any, instances of true LFE, but bass activity is appropriate and natural sounding


Special Features (Disc 1): 4.5/5

Audio Commentary with Director Terence Young and Members of the Cast and Crew: John Cork of the Ian Fleming Foundation serves as the moderator/narrator for this collection of trivia and pre-recorded interview clips with cast and crew. It is tightly scripted and Cork is clearly reading, but the information is interesting and well chosen, with the interviews enhancing it. The only criticism is the commentary packs in so much information that it is sometimes hard to keep up, but this is usually alleviated by the pre-recorded interviews.


Special Features (Disc 2): 4/5

[Declassified: MI6 Vault]
Ian Fleming: The CBC Interview (7m42s): Black-and-white television Canadian news interview with Fleming, produced on the event of Fleming's death in 1964. The opening shot provides a bit of interesting trivia related to "GoldenEye."

Ian Fleming and Raymond Chandler Featurette (5m11s): Fleming's audio interview of Chandler for the BBC, set to a slideshow of archival photos of the two authors.

Ian Fleming on Desert Island Discs (5m11s): BBC audio interview with Fleming, discussing his time in the British Navy, working as a journalist, and his writing routine. Set to a slideshow of archival photos.

Animated Storyboard Sequence (1m27s): Original storyboard sequence of the boat chase scene, with the actual scene edited in for comparison.

Credits (1m20s): Production credits for the "MI6 Vault."


[007 Mission Control]
An interesting feature, giving random access to scenes around a particular character or theme, all in DD5.1 audio and enhanced for widescreen displays. Better than skipping through the feature disc? It depends. For fans of the opening title sequence, this is an easy way to access it. And obviously users aren't meant to watch all the clips, but only access their favorites; otherwise, why not just watch the feature disc? The one departure from simple clips from the film is the "Exotic Locations" item, which is a montage of film locales with narration by Maude Adams.


[Mission Dossier]
Inside "From Russia With Love" (33m43s): History of the film, featuring interviews with cast and crew and archival photos. Not an exhaustive treatment, but nicely produced and a good catch up with surviving contributors to the film. Daniela Bianchi receives a good share of interview time, while Sean Connery provides only a brief soundbite.

Harry Saltzman: Showman (26m41s): Biography of Producer Harry Saltzman, who worked with Albert Broccoli on the first nine Bond films, featuring interviews with surviving family and industry colleagues.


[Ministry of Propaganda]
Theatrical Archive: (7m31s) Three theatrical trailers. The second trailer, "Bond Back to Back," promotes a double feature of the film with "Dr. No" and the third, "Bond Sale," a double feature with "Thunderball."

TV Broadcasts (1m36s): TV spots promoting the "Bond Sale" double features.

Radio Communication (1m29s): Radio spots promoting the "Bond Sale."


[Image Database]
A large image gallery filled with the requisite mix of promotional stills, on-set shots, and advertising materials.


Title Recap

The Feature: 4/5
Video Quality: 4.5/5
Audio Quality: 4/5
Special Features (Disc 1): 4.5/5
Special Features (Disc 2): 4/5
Overall Score (not an average): 4.5/5

Great picture and sound with a nice collection of extras. One of my favorite titles in the set.

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On Her Majesty's Secret Service
Year: 1969
Rating: PG
Running Time: 2h22m
Video: 2.35:1 anamorphic
Audio: English DTS Surround, English 5.1 Dolby Surround, English Mono, French 5.1 Dolby Surround
Subtitles: English, French, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese, Korean, Thai
TV-Generated Closed Captions: English

The Feature: 4/5
James Bond (George Lazenby, in his sole turn as Bond) allies himself with a European mob boss and his daughter (Diana Rigg) in his continuing hunt for Ernst Blofeld (Telly Savalas). His search ultimately leads him to the snowy peaks of the Swiss Alps where Blofeld is hatching his latest plot for world domination.


Video Quality: 4/5
- mild edge halos evident in most extreme contrast situations
- image is softer compared to "From Russia With Love," with a more muted color palette and sometimes hazy quality (perhaps more so in the romantic scenes)
- solid black levels; very good contrast and color saturation
- good detail and texture
- no signs of damage, dirt or dust


Audio Quality: 4/5
- Surround channels are used more aggressively on this title with the soundtrack and environmental noises, though still implemented judiciously and effectively
- DTS track sounds more expansive than the DD5.1
- existence of the original mono track will please purists, but it sounds a bit on the harsh side, making the DTS track preferable in this case
- apparent LFE towards the end of the avalanche sequence


Special Features (Disc 1): 4.5/5

Audio Commentary with Director Peter Hunt and Members of the Cast and Crew: Cork returns as moderator/narrator, using the same approach as in the previous title's commentary. The pacing is a bit slower this time, but there is still plenty of information for the viewer to digest, with Director Peter Hunt contributing the majority of recollections.


Special Features (Disc 2): 4/5

[Declassified: MI6 Vault]
Casting "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" (1m26s): Producer Michael Wilson voices over archival footage of Lazenby and Rigg at promotional visits.

Press Day in Portugal (1m32s): Ann Bennett of Eon Productions Marketing voices over archival footage of a press event restaging the wedding scene.

George Lazenby: In His Own Words (9m27s): Archival interviews of Lazenby before, during and after the production. The third interview, filmed in 1970, is most interesting as Lazenby speaks candidly about his production experiences and rumors around various conflicts. In the final interview, shot in 2002, Lazenby offers greater perspective on what he was going through at the time.

Shot on Ice - Original 1969 Ford Promo Film (9m45s): A fairly extensive look behind the scenes of the ice racing sequence.

Swiss Movement - Original 1969 Featurette (7m34s):
A look at filming in the Swiss Alps, with the requisite promotional hype.

Credits (1m22s): Production credits for the "MI6 Vault."


[007 Mission Control]
An interesting feature, giving random access to scenes around a particular character or theme, all in DD5.1 audio and enhanced for widescreen displays. Better than skipping through the feature disc? It depends. For fans of the opening title sequence, this is an easy way to access it (with and without the credits). And obviously users aren't meant to watch all the clips, but only access their favorites; otherwise, why not just watch the feature disc? The one departure from simple clips from the film is the "Exotic Locations" item, which is a montage of film locales with narration by Maude Adams.


[Mission Dossier]
Inside "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" (41m40s): History of the film, featuring interviews with cast and crew and archival photos. Spends a good amount of time on the search for a new Bond and consideration of Lazenby. Nicely produced, entertaining and informative, though the question of whether Lazenby quit or was let go remains unclear.

Inside Q's Lab (10m26s): A tribute to Q, one of the most popular characters of the Bond franchise, and
Desmond Llewelyn, the actor who played him.

Above It All - Original 1969 Featurette (5m40s): A look at how the production crew, in particular camera operator Johnny Jordan, captured the movie's aerial footage.


[Ministry of Propaganda]
Theatrical Trailer (2m15s): A bit on the cheeky side.

TV Broadcasts (3m10s):
Five TV spots with various themes.

Radio Communication: Radio promotions run around 4m30s. Audio interviews with Lazenby, Rigg, Savalas and Hunt run 27m43s combined. Rigg's and Savalas's interviews are completely produced packages, though the interviewer's question's may have been inserted in post given the differences in audio quality. Lazenby's and Hunt's interviews are missing the interview questions and can be a bit harder to follow. The interviews don't offer much that hasn't been heard already, though they are interesting as promotional artifacts.


[Image Database]
A large image gallery filled with the requisite mix of promotional stills, on-set shots, and advertising materials.


Title Recap

The Feature: 4/5
Video Quality: 4/5
Audio Quality: 4/5
Special Features (Disc 1): 4.5/5
Special Features (Disc 2): 4/5
Overall Score (not an average): 4/5

Put me in the camp that thinks this film is underrated. Lazenby and Rigg are excellent and the straightforward approach to Bond is a nice change of pace. Very good picture and sound with a nice set of extras make this another of my favorite titles from the set.

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Live and Let Die
Year: 1973
Rating: PG
Running Time: 2h02m
Video: 1.85:1 anamorphic
Audio: English DTS Surround, English 5.1 Dolby Surround, French 5.1 Dolby Surround
Subtitles: English, French, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese, Korean, Thai
TV-Generated Closed Captions: English

The Feature: 2.5/5
James Bond (Roger Moore in his franchise debut) investigates the murder of three British agents, which leads him to a heroin operation run by a Carribean island's prime minister
(Yaphet Kato).


Video Quality: 4/5
- image is a bit soft in the pre-title scenes, but is very good for the remainder of the film, with only occasional moments of softness, mostly in wide shots
- very good detail and texture
- modest edge halos discernible in most extreme contrast situations
- solid black levels; very good contrast and color saturation, which shows off the colorful interiors of the New Orleans settings
- no signs of damage, dirt or dust


Audio Quality: 3.5/5
- DTS track sounds more expansive than the DD5.1 and is overall preferred
- surround channels are at their loudest and most active with music cues, emphasizing or supporting dramatic and action scenes
- environmental surround effects are appropriately used for things like helicopter flyovers, the boat chase and the forest scenes and are more restrained and balanced compared to the music cues
- dialogue is consistently clear and intelligible
- no moments of obvious LFE but bass activity is natural and appropriate with things like explosions and the heavy voodoo drums


Special Features (Disc 1): 4/5

Audio Commentary with Sir Roger Moore: A few interesting stories spread over two hours make the commentary difficult to recommend, especially with the frequent moments of dead air and Moore's tendency toward mere description/reaction to scenes. There also doesn't seem to be much information offered that can't be learned on the other commentaries or on the second disc.

Audio Commentary Featuring Guy Hamilton: Cork returns as moderator and narrator with a collection of pre-recorded audio interviews with Director Hamilton and various members of the cast and crew. Though the track is not as replete with information as some others, it maintains the same level of quality.

Audio Commentary Featuring Tom Mankiewicz: Screenwriter Mankiewicz gets a commentary all his own and provides a fine blend of background information, production recollections and perspectives as a writer, though the track is not without gaps and it gets particularly sparse towards the end of the film. One of the recurring themes is the difference between writing for Roger Moore vs. writing for Sean Connery.


Special Features (Disc 2): 3/5

[Declassified: MI6 Vault]
Bond 1973: The Lost Documentary (21m39s): Straightforward promotional style documentary with particular attention paid to stunts and action sequences. One bizarre moment - Julius Harris, who played Tee Hee, demonstrates his hook prop to a couple kids in a swimming pool - had me scratching my head.

Roger Moore as James Bond, Circa 1964 (7m44s): Moore's unearthed comedic portrayal of James Bond on television variety show "Mainly Millicent." Amusing.

Live and Let Die Conceptual Art (1m39s): Montage of poster art considered for promoting the film.

Credits (1m21s): Production credits for the "MI6 Vault."


[007 Mission Control]
An interesting feature, giving random access to scenes around a particular character or theme, all in DD5.1 audio and enhanced for widescreen displays. Better than skipping through the feature disc? It depends. For fans of the opening title sequence, this is an easy way to access it. And obviously users aren't meant to watch all the clips, but only access their favorites; otherwise, why not just watch the feature disc? The one departure from simple clips from the film is the "Exotic Locations" item, which is a montage of film locales with narration by Maude Adams.



[Mission Dossier]
Inside "Live and Let Die" (29m45s): Brief history of the film, featuring interviews with cast and crew and archival photos and film. Spends some time on the search for a new Bond and writing a film for a new generation. Nicely produced, entertaining, with some interesting archival footage, like all five of croc farm owner Ross Kananga's croc-hopping attempts.

On Set with Roger Moore: Hang Gliding Lessons (3m51s):
Archival piece showing Moore's preparation for the hang gliding scenes.


[Ministry of Propaganda]
Theatrical Archive (4m40s): Two theatrical trailers in
4:3 standard.

TV Broadcasts (2m35s): Three TV spots with various themes, the first involving quite a bit of milk consumption for the UK Milk Board.

Radio Communication (1m30s): Two promotional radio spots.


[Image Database]
A modest image gallery with the requisite mix of promotional stills, on-set shots, and advertising materials.


Title Recap

The Feature: 2.5/5
Video Quality: 4/5
Audio Quality: 3.5/5
Special Features (Disc 1): 4/5
Special Features (Disc 2): 3/5
Overall Score (not an average): 2.5/5

A dated and somewhat embarrassing story makes this one of the weaker titles in the franchise and the worst one in the set, though picture and sound are above average. The amount of special features are on par with the preceding titles, but somehow feel less in-depth.

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For Your Eyes Only
Year: 1981
Rating: PG
Running Time: 2h08m
Video: 2.35:1 anamorphic
Audio: English DTS Surround, English 5.1 Dolby Surround, French 5.1 Dolby Surround
Subtitles: English, French, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese, Korean, Thai
TV-Generated Closed Captions: English

The Feature: 3/5
James Bond (Roger Moore) must locate a sunken British spy ship and recover a device that can control the fleet's nuclear submarines.


Video Quality: 3.5/5
- image sharpness in the first half is generally better than the second; beginning with the scene in the casino sharpness becomes inconsistent with variance sometimes in the same scene or shot
- modest edge halos discernible in most extreme contrast situations
- solid black levels; very good contrast and color saturation, with muted colors typical of films of the era
- no signs of damage, dirt or dust


Audio Quality: 3.5/5
- DTS track sounds more expansive than the DD5.1 and is overall preferred
- aggressive use of surrounds right from the start, mostly with the music soundtrack, though there are also plenty of environmental effects
- opening title sequence a great mix, putting all five channels to work
- the often exaagerated surround effects are consistent with the sometimes cartoonish action and story
- dialogue is consistently clear and intelligible, though the action scenes' audio can be so pumped up that it takes a bit to adjust to the more quiet moments
- one odd moment is Bond's entry into the Cuban compound and the placement of the diegetic music is too strong in the left channel and winds up being disorienting
- no moments of obvious LFE but bass activity is natural and appropriate


Special Features (Disc 1): 4/5

Audio Commentary with Sir Roger Moore: A few interesting stories spread over two hours make the commentary difficult to recommend, especially with the frequent moments of dead air and Moore's tendency toward mere description/reaction to scenes. There also doesn't seem to be much information offered that can't be learned on the other commentaries or on the second disc.

Audio Commentary Featuring John Glen and Actors: Cork returns, but this time to introduce the commentary track ported from the previous release (not sure of the point there). The commentary follows the same scripted format as the others, combining pre-recorded audio interviews with bits of movie history and trivia, which gives the listener plenty to take in.

Audio Commentary Featuring Michael G. Wilson and Crew: Cork introduces another ported commentary track, this time centering on the experiences and memories of the crew. Once again the scripted commentary and inclusion of pre-recorded interviews makes for an overall more interesting and consistent experience.


Special Features (Disc 2): 4/5

[Declassified: MI6 Vault]
Deleted Scenes and Expanded Angles: Deleted scenes include one from the hockey scene, in which Bond dumps a load of snow on his opponents, and the other a shortened bit of dialogue between Bond and Melina. The "Expanded Angle" segment makes use of the multi-angle feature, allowing the user to switch between the original cut and unused footage of the same scene. A third video track puts the two side-by-side for comparison. Mildly interesting but not likely one to revisit.

Bond in Greece (5m56s): Producer Michael Wilson comments on behind-the-scenes footage from the shoot in Greece.

Bond in Cortina (4m19s): Wilson comments on
behind-the-scenes footage from the shoot in Cortina, Spain.

Neptune's Journey (3m33s):
Wilson comments on behind-the-scenes footage from the underwater shoots, which were directed by Al Giddings. Turns out the sub built for the film was the catalyst for the formation of the Ian Fleming Foundation.

Credits (1m15s): Production credits for the "MI6 Vault."


[007 Mission Control]
An interesting feature, giving random access to scenes around a particular character or theme, all in DD5.1 audio and enhanced for widescreen displays. Better than skipping through the feature disc? It depends. For fans of the opening title sequence (with and without text), this is an easy way to access it. And obviously users aren't meant to watch all the clips, but only access their favorites; otherwise, why not just watch the feature disc? The one departure from simple clips from the film is the "Exotic Locations" item, which is a montage of film locales with narration by Maude Adams.



[Mission Dossier]
Inside "For Your Eyes Only" (29m46s): Brief history of the film, featuring interviews with cast and crew and archival photos and film. Spends time on the filmmakers bringing Bond "back down to earth" after the outlandishness of "Moonraker" and the various stunt sequences. Nicely produced, entertaining, with interesting archival footage.

Animated Storyboard Sequence - Snowmobile Chase (1m13s): Intercut with actual footage and set to the film score.


Animated Storyboard Sequence - Underwater (1m47s): Intercut with actual footage and set to the film score.

Sheena Easton Music Video (2m46): Music video of "For Your Eyes Only." Matted widescreen and Dolby Stereo.


[Ministry of Propaganda]
Theatrical Trailer (2m06s): Matted widescreen.


TV Broadcasts (11m44s): Three (rather long for) TV trailers.

Radio Communication (1m06s): Two promotional radio spots.


[Image Database]
Large image gallery with the requisite mix of promotional stills, on-set shots, and advertising materials.


Title Recap

The Feature: 3/5
Video Quality: 3.5/5
Audio Quality: 3.5/5
Special Features (Disc 1): 4/5
Special Features (Disc 2): 4/5
Overall Score (not an average): 3.5/5

More enjoyable than the set's other Roger Moore title, though picture and sound quality are not as good. As with "Live and Let Die," the special features on "For Your Eyes Only" feel a bit superficial when all is said and done.

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GoldenEye
Year: 1995
Rating: PG-13
Running Time: 2h10m
Video: 2.35:1 anamorphic
Audio: English DTS Surround, English 5.1 Dolby Surround, French 5.1 Dolby Surround
Subtitles: English, French, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese, Korean, Thai
TV-Generated Closed Captions: English

The Feature: 3.5 /5
James Bond (Pierce Brosnan, in his franchise debut) must stop a group of former Soviets from using GoldenEye, an orbiting electromagnetic pulse device, and destroying Britain's economic infrastructure.


Video Quality: 4.5/5
- slight edge halos but only in most extreme contrast situations
- overall nicely sharp with wide shots suffering only slightly
- solid and consistent black levels
- good contrast and color saturation
- no dirt, dust or scratches
- despite film being relatively recent it has the look of an older film, which may have been the aesthetic the filmmakers were going for


Audio Quality: 4/5
- newest film in the set features most amount of surround activity, overall seamless and effectively implemented
- audio system gets full workout with the tank chase scene, combining environmental effects with the Bond theme cranked full
- DTS track sounds more expansive than DD5.1
- some audio effects sound a bit dated in quality and fidelity
- LFE is full and healthy, but use seems a bit inconsistent, showing up with helicopter lift off but noticeably missing or weak with some of the early explosions


Special Features (Disc 1): 4/5

Audio Commentary with Director Martin Campbell and Producer Michael Wilson: Campbell and Wilson find plenty to discuss about the "GoldenEye" production, providing a good blend of behind-the-scenes information and logistical/technical explanations. The two definitely seem to have a good working relationship, which helps to move the commentary along.


Special Features (Disc 2): 5/5

[Declassified: MI6 Vault]
Deleted Scenes: Four scenes, each introduced by Director Martin Campbell, all rather forgettable except the last of Robbie Coltrane's character shaking down a deceitful arms dealer

Directing Bond: The Martin Chronicles (10m19s): A look at Campbell's sometimes abrasive personality but strong work ethic and high standards, as told by cast and crew and behind the scenes footage.

Directing Bond Segments with Martin Campbell Comments (2m51s): Campbell explains his expletive-filled rant and the comments of Director of Photography Phil Meheux from the previous featurette.

Building A Better Bond: Pre-Production Featurette (9m03s): Producer Michael Wilson explains the featurette was created in 1994 to excite theater owners about the new Bond production. Includes the announcement of Brosnan as the new Bond, behind the scenes of pre-production, which included the construction of a new soundstage facility, and a look at some of the props and set models. A nice pre-DVD format promotional artifact.

The Return of Bond - The Start of Production Press Event (5m30s): A more thorough look at the 1994 press conference announcing Brosnan as Bond, with backstage video footage of the cast and director prepping and being prepped.

Driven to Bond: Remy Julienne (2m58s): A peek at Stunt Coordinator Julienne's work with the opening Aston Martin and Ferrari chase scene.

Anatomy of a Stunt: Tank vs. Perrier (6m09s): A look at the logistics and planning behind the latter part of the tank chase scene that involved smashing through a Perrier truck.

Making It Small in Pictures: Derek Meddings (2m39s): A look at the scale model work of Derek Meddings, who passed away shortly after the film was completed.

On Location with Peter Lamont (12m31s): Production Designer Lamont shares location scouting video footage and set tests.

GoldenEye: The Secret Files (28m28s): 1995 promotional feature covering all phases of the production. Some of the information is a rehash of the preceding material, but the piece provides additional information about the train scene, car chase sequence and other stunt sequences.

GoldenEye: The Secret Files - The Cast (12m19s): On-set interviews with supporting players Judi Dench, Robbie Coltrane, Famke Jannsen, Sean Bean, Izabella Scorupco, Alan Cumming, and Desmond Llewelyn.

Pre-Title Storyboard Sequence with Director Martin Campbell (1m33s): Campbell explains the usefulness of storyboards, looking specifically at the escape sequence from the Soviet nerve gas facility.

Credits (1m25s): Production credits for the "MI6 Vault."


[007 Mission Control]
An interesting feature, giving random access to scenes around a particular character or theme, all in DD5.1 audio and enhanced for widescreen displays. Better than skipping through the feature disc? It depends. For fans of the opening title sequence (with and without text), this is an easy way to access it, though the editing is rather sloppy at the end of it. And obviously users aren't meant to watch all the clips, but only access their favorites; otherwise, why not just watch the feature disc? The one departure from simple clips from the film is the "Exotic Locations" item, which is a montage of film locales with narration by Samantha Bond.


[Mission Dossier]
The World of 007 - Original 1995 television special hosted by Elizabeth Hurley (43m27s): I remember seeing this Bond retrospective in 1995 and 1) having no idea who Hurley was and 2) finding her a bit annoying while being quite attractive. While the special was produced to build enthusiasm for the release of "GoldenEye" it's a fun and well made (though certainly not exhaustive) retrospective of the franchise up to 1995. It's also an interesting peek at Hurley early in her career, just two years before her involvement in "Austin Powers."

The GoldenEye Video Journal (14m15s): Covers the first day of shooting at Leavesden Studios, Judi Dench as the new M, on location in Puerto Rico (standing in as Cuba), Q's workshop, the dam jump, and the motorcycle jump. Much of the footage will look familiar from the preceding special features.

Promotional Featurette (4m51s): Standard overview of the film with movie clips, behind-the-scenes footage and interviews.

"GoldenEye" Music Video Performed by Tina Turner (3m32s): Standard stylish music video footage intercut with clips from the film.


[Ministry of Propaganda]
Theatrical Archive (4m44s): Two theatrical trailers, neither enhanced for widescreen. The first appears 1.85:1, the other 2.35:1.

TV Broadcasts (6m19s): Twelve trailers that ran on TV, promoting the film pre and post release date.


[Image Database]
Over 75 images with the requisite mix of promotional stills, on-set shots and advertising materials.


Title Recap

The Feature: 3.5/5
Video Quality: 4.5/5
Audio Quality: 4/5
Special Features (Disc 1): 4/5
Special Features (Disc 2): 5/5
Overall Score (not an average): 4/5

The most recent Bond film in the set has great picture and sound and a massive amount of extras. Though not my favorite film in the set, it's a fine debut for Brosnan's Bond.

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Equipment: Toshiba 42" CRT RPTV fed a 1080i signal from an Oppo DV-971 DVD player. Audio evaluation is based on an Onkyo TX-SR575x 5.1 AVR running JBL S26 mains and surrounds, JBL S-Center, and BFD-equalized SVS 20-39 PCi subwoofer.

One thing leads to another at cameronyee.com

#2 of 7 CameronMcC

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Posted January 12 2007 - 04:35 PM

i think its also worth noting that several people have had faulty copies of From Russia With Love in this set.

#3 of 7 Blair G

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Posted January 13 2007 - 03:27 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by CameronMcC
i think its also worth noting that several people have had faulty copies of From Russia With Love in this set.

Can you elaborate on what this fault is so that I know what to look for?

Thanks Posted Image

#4 of 7 Jim-M

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Posted January 13 2007 - 04:15 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blair G
Can you elaborate on what this fault is so that I know what to look for?

Thanks Posted Image
It won't load in your player or DVD-ROM drive, yet it might work on a different player that you have. Kind of strange. A few of us have had the same problems with that disc, and only that disc, but it really doesn't seem to be that widespread since the forums haven't exploded with that issue.

#5 of 7 Frank@N

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Posted January 13 2007 - 05:06 AM

Seem like they really loaded up the new extras on GoldenEye. Is this typical for the newer films on UE series?

Also, shouldn't there be an 'Inside GoldenEye' from previous SE in the Mission Dossier section?

#6 of 7 CameronMcC

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Posted January 13 2007 - 06:48 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blair G
Can you elaborate on what this fault is so that I know what to look for?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim-M
It won't load in your player or DVD-ROM drive, yet it might work on a different player that you have. Kind of strange. A few of us have had the same problems with that disc, and only that disc, but it really doesn't seem to be that widespread since the forums haven't exploded with that issue.

exactly. I tried 5 disc before getting one that would play across the board. the first four disc would not load in two of my players, while it would play on my pioneer. You'll know just as soon as you put it in and its no go.

#7 of 7 Ray H

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Posted January 13 2007 - 07:46 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank@N
Seem like they really loaded up the new extras on GoldenEye. Is this typical for the newer films on UE series?

Also, shouldn't there be an 'Inside GoldenEye' from previous SE in the Mission Dossier section?
The newer films tend to have more in the way of behind the scenes footage, featurettes and deleted scenes that aren't featured on the older ones.

And no, the "Inside..." documentaries by John Cork didn't go beyond the Dalton films. A shame since it would've been nice to see them continued for this release.
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