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Enough already Fox. Are we EVER going to see WKRP released?


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649 replies to this topic

#641 of 650 MatthewA

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Posted August 22 2008 - 03:34 PM

If they still exist, they are likely on 1" or even 3/4" tape.

Enough is enough, Disney. No more evasions or excuses. We DEMAND the release Song of the South on Blu-ray along with the uncut version of Bedknobs and Broomsticks on Blu-ray. I will not support anything your company produces until then.


#642 of 650 Jaime_Weinman

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Posted August 22 2008 - 04:25 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob P S
So are the original syndicated reruns still floating around or have they all been destroyed?

All the WKRP bootlegs being sold are apparently from those syndicated reruns, with most of the music but 3 minutes cut from each episode. They were taped off TV, not taken from masters, though.

The older syndication version is no longer distributed; any station that wants to run the show gets the '90s package.

#643 of 650 george kaplan

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Posted August 24 2008 - 01:48 AM

Well I don't know how long it's going to take, but I do have hope that someday, things will change around (laws, budgets, etc.) and that this will be released correctly. Until that day, I pray it sells as poorly as possible, because if they think they can make the profit they need by selling the crappy syndicated versions, then we'll NEVER get the real show.
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#644 of 650 Matt.Koz

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Posted August 25 2008 - 04:54 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaime_Weinman
Oh, and American Life and WGN appear to be using the exact same package, the one that is distributed by Fox and was prepared by MTM back in the '90s when they nuked the show's music.

Are you sure? The American Life episodes appear much more "complete" although time compressed.

#645 of 650 HenryDuBrow

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Posted August 28 2008 - 02:47 AM

The complete and uncut versions were shown overseas in the late 80s, friend of mine taped them.

#646 of 650 Bryan^H

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Posted May 10 2009 - 03:22 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by george kaplan
Well I don't know how long it's going to take, but I do have hope that someday, things will change around (laws, budgets, etc.) and that this will be released correctly. Until that day, I pray it sells as poorly as possible, because if they think they can make the profit they need by selling the crappy syndicated versions, then we'll NEVER get the real show.

I hope the music/home video laws change too. It makes me sick that such a great show is in limbo because of the stupid music rights issue. Maybe Fox will release a UK, or German dvd some day(with all the great music included). Probably wasn't very popular in other countries though. This show is about as American as apple pie.

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#647 of 650 Stephen Wight

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Posted May 10 2009 - 05:21 PM

And it makes me sick that the UK and Germany have a better chance of getting an intact WKRP than we do.Are the laws that different over there?

#648 of 650 David Rain

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Posted May 10 2009 - 06:30 PM

the problem isn't just about laws. It's also about music rights holders who charge WAY too much for the use of their songs. That also has to change. But it probably won't.
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#649 of 650 Mark Talmadge

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Posted May 10 2009 - 07:35 PM

The problem is that these studios think that they should be able to release these shows with the original music intact while, at the same, paying very little for the music rights.

There's also the problem that these studios misinform the public regarding these music rights and this ends up alienating fans of these television shows against the music artists and the rights' holders of that music.

If you want someone to blame, blame the original producers of these television shows that used so much music in the shows in the first place.

Everyone keeps forgetting that these music artists and the rights holders deserve to be fairly compensated for their work. Until these television studios agree on a compensation arrangement with the music industry, this will never change.

#650 of 650 BobO'Link

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Posted May 11 2009 - 02:42 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Talmadge
The problem is that these studios think that they should be able to release these shows with the original music intact while, at the same, paying very little for the music rights.
I don't think so. When it's "reported" that program "X" will cost ~$50/season with music replacements *or* ~$100+ with original music it's truly hard to fully blame the studio. Now, this could all be back wind from the studio to make the music artists look bad and force them to take less money for future projects, but I feel it's really both parties being greedy. Don't get me wrong, I feel both are due "fair compensation" for their work. However, what we see as "fair" is far different than what the studios/artists see.

As far as WKRP, from what I see, the problem is that when these shows were produced there was little thought for the home video market so music wasn't licensed for that venue... just the original/repeat broadcasts. This was also done to reduce costs as even licensing for the syndication market, which *might* have helped later with home video, required more $$ up front. Now it's common for licensing to be done for original airing, syndication, and eventual home release, but back then it just wasn't done. Frequently the syndication rights were not purchased due to expense. Then there's a situation, WKRP fits this, where *some* artists are virtual unknowns when a program is first produced so the original licensing fee is very low. They later become big stars and then want exhorbitant fees when approched later about including their work in syndication/home markets. The producers of WKRP have said they only looked at original broadcast rights due to expense and to help keep the show on the air.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Talmadge
There's also the problem that these studios misinform the public regarding these music rights and this ends up alienating fans of these television shows against the music artists and the rights' holders of that music.
True, but it goes both ways. Both parties are basically money hungry and generally have little regard for the "little people" who truly pay their inflated saleries purchasing overpriced product. Plus I don't think people are that easily duped. Joe Public knows that both sides are at fault but the studios are very good at deflecting the blame, at least temporarily. It tends to come back around to them when the buying public has had enough and says "We don't care how much it'd cost, do it right!" only to be ignored. I've seen more comments from people saying "I'll *never* purchase a release from (insert studio here) again because they were too cheap to do it right!" than "I'll *never* purchase music from (insert artist here) because they wanted too much money for their 30 second music clip!".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Talmadge
If you want someone to blame, blame the original producers of these television shows that used so much music in the shows in the first place.
Yes, to a degree, but you have to look at what they were trying to accomplish and the target audience. Music in this type program generates a certain authenticity to the end product. If they had used "generic" music from the start they would have been doomed as the target audience would have essentially said "What a load of crap! Generic music on a show about a top 40 radio station?". Part of the original lure were the artists and how they were worked into the scripts. Even "The Wonder Years" would not be the same had it not used period music. This goes for just about *any* program stalled by music rights when "popular" music is the issue. The music was/is part of the charm. In the end it is typically shortsightedness and budget that tend to be the real cause of blame, although it's hard to see where all this comes into play with programs such as "The Fugitive" and "My Three Sons" who have music rights issues on the releases.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Talmadge
Everyone keeps forgetting that these music artists and the rights holders deserve to be fairly compensated for their work. Until these television studios agree on a compensation arrangement with the music industry, this will never change.
Yes, but just what is "fair" compensation? I fully believe an artist *should* be compensated for their work. It's why I *purchase* music instead of just dl/ripping/etc. a CD in spite of the fact that *most* artists make their money from touring with the CD typically a loss leader/promotional item in their pocketbook. But often you'll see a multi-millionaire artist charging exhorbitant rates for one of "their" songs because they are "the greatest ever" in their eyes. Frequently it's the "back office" who is doing the negotiating and they are "looking out for the boys" (i.e. we've got to protect our phony balony jobs gentlemen). If "artists" would look at the inclusion of their work as a promotional effort (like the CD) and charge accordingly it could make everyone happy... the studio (less up front monies), the artist (could get a modest regular residual based on airings/sales, you know... like radio), and the consumer (gets the complete, original product without bastardization by greedy corporate "suits"). Of course, as you indicate, the studios also have to come to agreement and not expect to pay a pittance for licensing while charging a kings' ransom.

The long and short of it is that I blame them all.


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