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DVD Reviews

HTF REVIEW: Humphrey Bogart - The Signature Collection Volume II (HIGHLY RECOMMENDED)



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#1 of 21 OFFLINE   Herb Kane

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Posted October 22 2006 - 10:44 AM

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Humphrey Bogart
The Signature Collection
Volume II






Studio: Warner Brothers
Format: DVD
Year: Various
Rated: Not Rated
Film Length: Various
Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1 Standard
Audio: DD Monaural
Color/B&W: B&W
Languages: English
Subtitles: English, French & Spanish
MSRP: $59.92 (Signature Collection), $29.92 (The Maltese Falcon)
Package: 7 discs in 6 Slimline cases in a cardboard case





The Features:
After much demand, the long awaited follow-up, The Humphrey Bogart Signature Collection, Volume II recently debuted. The highlight of the collection showcases a spruced up version of the 1941 masterpiece, The Maltese Falcon as a Three-Disc Special Edition as well as six new to DVD titles including, Across The Pacific, Action In The North Atlantic, All Through The Night and Passage To Marseille. As a fantastic bonus, two other film versions of Hammett’s crime novel are included with the SE; the original pre-code, The Maltese Falcon from 1931 and the lighthearted Satan Met A Lady from 1936. The Maltese Falcon SE is available separately at $29.92 while the other titles are exclusive to the collection at $59.92.

Born on Christmas Day, 1899, Humphrey DeForest Bogart was the son of a Manhattan surgeon and had a privileged upbringing. After many stage and minor film roles, he caught the eye of Warner Brothers after starring in The Petrified Forest. The rest, as they say, is history. Bogart was named the AFI’s #1 male movie star of all time. Perhaps the unlikeliest of characters, Bogie embodied smart and courageous tough-guys like no other Hollywood actor. The most recognizable icon from classic film, Bogart starred in 85 films and has since become one of the biggest draws selling more than five million copies of VHS and DVD (Paramount, Columbia and Fox, are you paying attention). He earned an Academy Award for his 1951 performance of The African Queen and nominations for Casablanca (1942) and The Caine Mutiny (1954).

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The Maltese Falcon (Directed by John Huston – 1941)

Let’s start right off with the crème de la crème of the collection. To say that I like The Maltese Falcon, would be the greatest understatement in the history of the modern world – at least my modern world. All of us here have certain films that they have a special fondness for, and this is without question, mine. I have watched the film countless times over the years and never grow tired of its razor sharp dialogue, gripping suspense and it’s unparalleled chemistry of eclectic players. In fact one has to think long and hard if ever a film demonstrated dialogue as cutting and brisk as this one.

For those of you who have followed my weekly reviews and rants, many of you are aware of my obsession and passion for film noir. While many might not necessarily associate The Maltese Falcon with film noir (they should), it was this film which started my crazed fascination for the movement.

The film solidified Bogart’s stardom and was director John Huston’s debut at the helm. The Maltese Falcon puts on a “film chemistry clinic” with performances from Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, Elisha Cook Jr. and Mary Astor. Based on the work of Dashiell Hammett, Sam Spade (played by Humphrey Bogart) sets out in search of his partner’s killer. But, as the mystery unfolds, Bogart finds himself surrounded by a flock of low-life miscreants who are all in search of something else… a priceless jewel-encrusted falcon statuette.

The Maltese Falcon was nominated for three Academy Awards (Best Picture, Supporting Actor – Greenstreet and Screenplay – Huston) and in 1989 was added to the National Film Registry. It presently sits in the #23 spot on the American Film Institute’s (AFI) List of 100 Greatest Movies.


Across The Pacific (Directed by John Huston – 1942)

The winning team from The Maltese Falcon is reuinited for Across The Pacific. This crisply written wartime thriller reunites three Falcon leads; Bogart, Mary Astor and Sydney Greenstreet. John Huston directs the film and the combination is once again, a success. Not wanting to tamper with for the formula, the film has many of the same irresistible qualities that led to the success of The Maltese Falcon. Quirky humor and double crossing characters set the stage for the film in which a U.S. counterspy, Rick Leland (played by Bogart), falls romantically for Alberta Marlow (played by Astor) and finds himself supplying secrets to Lorenz (played by Greenstreet) as a group of saboteurs plot against the Panama Canal


Action In The North Atlantic (Directed by Lloyd Bacon – 1943)

The Merchant Marines are acknowledged here as they sail into action during World War II. The film highlights the efforts of a besieged freighter as it delivers essential supplies to those on the front lines. Joe Rossi (played by Bogart) is a WWI old timer who is First Officer to Captain Jarvis (played by Raymond Massey). Along the way, they match tactics and wits with German U-Boats and the Luftwaffe. The film eventually went on to become a training film for the civilian unit.


All Through The Night (Directed by Vincent Sherman – 1942)

Gloves Donahue (played by Bogart) appears in this off-beat comedy-thriller-parody as a petty crook and gambler. Unconcerned with current events in Europe, Gloves is more interested with his racing sheet and favorite “cheesecake”, that is, until the baker gets bumped off and that changes everything. The spoof is contagiously compelling as Gloves eventually gets pitted against Nazi spies. The film also sports a winning cast of shady-but-good-guys, William Demarest, Jackie Gleason and Phil Silvers. Conrad Veidt and long time Bogart co-star Peter Lorre also appear in the film.


Passage To Marseille (Directed by Michael Curtiz – 1944)

In Passage To Marseille, Humphrey Bogart reunites with his previous director from Casablanca - Michael Curtiz, as well as co-stars, Claude Rains, Peter Lorre and Sydney Greenstreet. Jean Matrac (played by Bogart) plays a WWII French patriot who escapes the infamous Devil’s Island, manages to survive a dangerous freighter voyage and eventually joins as a gunner serving with the Free French Air Corps.

-----

Just a quick note regarding the packaging of this set. All of the discs contained within the collection are housed in Slimcases (a welcomed new trend). However, it would seem as though changes to the collection caused some inconsistencies to the set itself. The 6 Slimline cases seem to be slightly too thin for the box itself (assuming changes were made to The Maltese Falcon set). Even the Slimcases themselves are rather an odd assortment as some of them are clear and a few of them are black – not a big deal but seems rather peculiar. While I rarely harp on such trivial issues, one can’t help but feel just slightly disappointed in the lackluster appointment of The Maltese Falcon – one of the greatest films of all time. It definitely deserves a much more prestigious treatment than it received.

The Maltese Falcon: 5/5 Across The Pacific: 3.5/5 http://static.hometh...milies_star.gif">Action in the North Atlantic: 4/5 http://static.hometh...milies_star.gif">All Through The Night: 4/5 http://static.hometh...milies_star.gif">Passage To Marseille: 3.5/5 http://static.hometh...milies_star.gif">Video:
No doubt the $64000 question is whether or not the new release of The Maltese Falcon represents a significant enough improvement to warrant a double dip. In a word; yes. While I’m not one to recommend many double dips, the new restored SE offers a fantastic new and improved image. While the previous version wasn’t necessarily a bad transfer, the SE beats its predecessor in literally every category. Sharpness is improved upon as is contrast and shadow detail. The image is far cleaner and free of most marks and blemishes. Grayscale also appears to be more impressive with the new SE. In any event, The Maltese Falcon is clearly the winner in the set in terms of its presentation.

The remainder of the set is a mixed bag and its mostly a “good” mixed bag. Across The Pacific is softer than most of the other entries in the collection however, I wouldn’t go as far as to say it is disappointing. Contrast is satisfactory and the image is mostly clean. Action in the North Atlantic looks very good. Image detail is slightly sharper than AtP and shadow detail as well as contrast is satisfactory – if not just slightly on the bright side. All Through The Night is excellent. Grayscale as well as shadow and contrast is impressive. Definition is also impressive and falls just short of the level of definition seen in TMF. Finally, Passage To Marseille is right up there with TMF – a tremendous image with excellent definition, terrific contrast and shadow levels and an impressive grayscale, although shows a few more marks and blemishes.

All in all, this is an excellent effort.

Overall Video: 4/5
http://static.hometh...milies_star.gif">Audio:
All of these films are presented in their original monaural (DD) encoded formats and do an excellent job at relaying the audio side of things. All of the discs are basically free of any noise or other distraction. A minute amount of his is only noticeable occasionally but the tracks remain natural sounding and uncompressed.

Most importantly, dialogue is always intelligible and bold. There is an impressive collection of scores to be found here all of which sound excellent and never in competition with the dialogue. Obviously due to the limitations of the period, there isn’t much to say about dynamics or punch, but these tracks do an admirable job.

Overall Audio: 3.5/5
http://static.hometh...milies_star.gif">Special Features:
The set is absolutely jam packed with features and looks like this:


The Maltese Falcon

  • Warner Brothers have given TMF the Three-Disc Special Edition treatment. The first disc contains the feature film, with an informative Commentary by Bogart biographer Eric Lax as well as a Theatrical Trailer that contains an introduction by Sydney Greenstreet which is in reasonably good shift.
  • In addition, the first disc includes a Warner Night at the Movies 1941. These are smart little features that WB have included in an attempt to re-create the movie-goers experience of the day. The first feature is a vintage newsreel which is followed by the Oscar-nominated Technicolor musical short The Gay Parisian. Next up is a trailer for Sergeant York as well as two classic LT/MM animated shorts, Hiawatha's Rabbit Hunt, in color (Bugs Bunny), and Meet John Doughboy, in black-and-white (Porky Pig).

    The real treat is located on Disc Two of this set and contains two previous film versions of the Dashiell Hammett novel that preceded the Bogart classic. The first is the 1931 version of The Maltese Falcon with Ricardo Cortez and Bebe Daniels, directed by Roy Del Ruth. The film was made a year following the book's success. The other movie is Satan Met a Lady from 1936 with Warren William and Bette Davis, directed by William Dieterle. In this case, the title was changed as were the names of the characters, much of the plot - even the name of the statuette. While both films pale in comparison to the ’41 classic, the inclusion is a welcomed one and the presentation of both is first rate.

    The final disc in the set contains much of the documentary material. First up is a new 2006 documentary entitled, The Maltese Falcon: One Magnificent Bird which provides bio information on Hammett, the book, and the movie. Several filmmakers, actors, and authors like Peter Bogdanovich, Richard Deakins, James Cromwell, Michael Madsen, Frank Miller make an appearance and offer their thoughts on the film. From TCM, Robert Osborne is up next and hosts Becoming Attractions: The Trailers of Humphrey Bogart, a smart and unique documentary which looks at the career of Humphrey Bogart. The always popular blooper reel, Breakdowns of 1941 which allows us to hear our favorite classic film stars using expletives after they toss their lines. Up next is a one-minute series of Mary Astor makeup tests. The final features are audio-only bonuses from 1943 and 1946, three radio-show adaptations of The Maltese Falcon two of them featuring the original stars, plus another version starring another long time Warner tough-guy, Edward G. Robinson.


    Across The Pacific
  • Warner Night At The Movies contains a vintage newsreel that centers around the building of a canal lock as well as a Technicolor short entitled, Men of the Sky featuring Hap Arnold in a WWII propaganda piece. Up next is an animated Chuck Jones short, entitled, The Draft Horse – a humorous quasi anti-war piece. There is also a trailer for Captains of the Clouds (WB, where is this DVD…?)... Next up is a short featuring Joan Leslie which talks about the patriotic Hollywood home-front. The breakdown reel is just as entertaining and features many hilarious star studded faux-paus.
  • The Theatrical Trailer has also been included and is in relatively good shape.


    Action in the North Atlantic
  • Warner Night At The Movies starts with a Jean Negulesco musical short about a classy exhibition dancing team followed by a featurette entitled, Credit Where Credit is Due which focuses on the work of lesser known contract directors. A radio show version starring George Raft and Raymond Massey rounds out the feature and exhibits adequate audio quality.
  • The Theatrical Trailer has also been included and is in pretty good shape.


    All Through The Night
  • First up is a special treat in the form of a Commentary from the late director Vincent Sherman who recorded this before his recent passing. Here, he shares time with Bogart biographer, Eric Lax. The feature is entertaining (at least in nostalgic sort of way) as Sherman reminisces while Lax deals with the biographical side of things.
  • Warner Night At The Movies starts with a Joe McDoakes comedy short, a Friz Freleng animated short, Lights Fantastic has been included as well as a Theatrical Trailer for Errol Flynn’s Gentleman Jim. The featurette Call the Usual Suspects is a piece centered around character actors and the system or philosophies of the old “recognizable” – but not necessarily known, character stalwarts.
  • The Theatrical Trailer has also been included and is in very good condition.


    Passage To Marseille
  • First up is a Documentary from Leva Filmworks which helps contextualize the complicated political situation which was taking place in France during the war. The film garnered a fair amount of criticism during its theatrical release – perhaps the feature is an attempt at putting everything in its proper perspective.
  • Warner Night At The Movies starts with an elaborate dramatic short I Won't Play which was directed by Crane Wilbur and features an early appearance from Dane Clark. Next up is a musical short called Jammin' the Blues as well as a Chuck Jones animated short entitled, The Weakly Reporter. The Theatrical Trailer is for Uncertain Glory, another Errol Flynn film that I suspect we’ll see released sooner rather than later is also present. The 1943 Breakdown reel is also present and just as entertaining.
  • And finally….. the Theatrical Trailer has also been included and is in excellent condition.

    Special Features: 5+/5
    http://static.hometh...milies_star.gif">

    **Special Features rated for the quality of supplements, not the quantity**



    Final Thoughts:
    Was it worth the wait…? You bet. Volume II of The Humphrey Bogart Signature Collection gets my vote as one of the best collections of the year thus far. Aside from a terrific collection of classic films, the presentation here is really something special. However, what really surprised me here were the special features. These discs (all of them) are jam packed with highly informative and entertaining special features befitting the grandest of any edition on DVD. These are presented in the form of the fan-favorite, Warner Night at the Movies and contain numerous worthwhile supplements.

    Folks, this is the stuff dreams are made of…

    Overall Rating: 4.5/5 (not an average)
    My Top 25 Noirs:

    25. 711 Ocean Drive (1950), 24. Odds Against Tomorrow (1959), 23. Desperate (1947), 22. Pushover (1954), 21. The Blue Dahlia (1946), 20. The File on Thelma Jordon (1949), 19. He Ran All the Way (1951), 18. The Asphalt Jungle (1950), 17. The Killing (1956), 16. I Walk Alone (1948),...

#2 of 21 OFFLINE   Robert Crawford

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Posted October 22 2006 - 10:57 AM

Great review this is one of my favorite boxsets. Not every film in it is a film classic perse like AFI Top 100 material, but they're films I have watched several times over in my lifetime from the Million Dollar Movie to Turner Classic Movies. Excellent job by Warner. There have been some packaging issues that some members have complained about, but I don't have a problem with such issues.




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#3 of 21 OFFLINE   CraigF

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Posted October 22 2006 - 12:05 PM

Thanks for the review Herb, I just ordered the set (from the US, JIC...).

I forget what the "packaging issue" was, something about TMF and a cardboard cover IIRC. Is that it? Does TMF have the same packaging as in the individual release? Thanks.

#4 of 21 OFFLINE   Tim Tucker

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Posted October 22 2006 - 12:37 PM

Yes, the slipcase that comes with the individual release of TMF is omitted from this collection, even though there is room for it. Some here have reported receiving the slipcase though.
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#5 of 21 OFFLINE   Roger Rollins

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Posted October 22 2006 - 01:38 PM

Thanks for the great review, Herb. Your reviews are always the highlight of my visits to this forum.

You are 100% right. This is a SENSATIONAL set!

Warner hardly ever double-dips. I think even the members here would agree that compared to the other studios, Warner is really smart about that. They aren't like Sony or Paramount or Universal, constantly recycling.

This FALCON is wonderful. Herb hit everything dead-on....and also, this is the first time I've ever seen the 1931 version with its original title restored. I've always seen it with the silly DANGEROUS FEMALE title they came up with for TV. While the Bogie version takes the cake, the '31 is fun with its pre-code naughtiness.

The extras are worth the price of admission on their own. Just to have more of those studio blooper reels looking so good, after seeing some of them for years in horrific pirated versions.

With the BOGART SIGNATURE COLLECTIONS 1 & 2, THE BOGIE & BACALL SET,
the TOUGH GUYS SET, and THE WARNER GANGSTERS set, virtually all of Bogart's top-tier work is now available and looking sensational.

That being said, I can't wait for CASABLANCA in HD-DVD in only a matter of days!

#6 of 21 OFFLINE   ted:r

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Posted October 23 2006 - 12:00 AM

I love this set and these movies (with the possible exception of "All Through The Night"). One can never have too much Bogart. All I can add is bring on Vol. 3!
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#7 of 21 OFFLINE   Russell G

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Posted October 23 2006 - 07:26 AM

I'm waiting for this one to arrive so I acan spend a week with this and the "Bogie and Bacall" set.

great review!! I can't wait to revist Falcon!

#8 of 21 OFFLINE   Steve...O

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Posted October 23 2006 - 02:03 PM

Great review Herb, thank you.

Since Herb's review is so thorough, I have just a few comments aside from a general statement that Warners did a first class job on this.

1. The picture quality on FALCON is every bit as good and better as all the comments have indicated. Truly a wonderful restoration job.

2. In my opinion, the two earlier versions of FALCON are unfairly maligned by Warners' own documentaries. The Cortez version is highly entertaining and is pre-code at its finest. One scene in the Bogie version that always bothered me with the shot of Archer being killed. Aside from giving away too much, it just didn't ring true with me. The Cortez version has the killing off camera which I think is more effective.

I am admittedly a huge Warren William fan and the over the top farce SATAN MET A LADY is a real treat. No, its not canon nor is it meant to be. The scene of William and Arthur Treacher in Shane's apartment is an unheralded comedy classic. These two films aren't the polished productions that Warners had in the 40s, but as examples of the entertaining programmers they churned out in the 30s, they are excellent.

3. I was a bit struck at how underwhelming PASSAGE is. With a stellar cast it should have been much better. I'd be curious to see how the membership feels about this movie. NIGHT as a comedy was ok although I thought Bogie seemed out of place. The supporting cast is what carried this one for me. One expected Allen Jenkins to appear at any moment. If Sheldon Leonard (or a reasonable facsimile) had been cast in the Bogie role I would have liked this more.

4. Even if you're not a Bogie fan, buy this for the blooper reels. There are some outtakes from KINGS ROW that are wonderful as are some Jimmy Stewart outtakes. There's no 1943 reel though? Did Warners not produce one or does it not exist anymore?

5. My one and only complaint about the set: no mail in poster offer for FALCON. Yes, I've been spoiled. Posted Image

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#9 of 21 OFFLINE   ted:r

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Posted October 24 2006 - 12:01 AM

I really liked "Passage". It was fun watching those flashback within a flashback within a flashback scenes. I thought the ending was a bit dragged out, but for wartime propaganda, I found it exciting and really enjoyed it.

"Night" was too betwixt and between for me. I could have enjoyed the comedy or the thriller in two different movies, but together they just felt odd.

These (with the obvious exception) are second-tier Bogart's, which is fine by me, since all the first tier Bogart's (with the obvious exception) have been released. Myself, I want to see all Bogart's and will willingly taste them all, even if it's only once.
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#10 of 21 OFFLINE   Ira Siegel

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Posted October 24 2006 - 11:03 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve...O
I was a big struck at how underwhelming PASSAGE is.
I agree. However, the Sidney Greenstreet role was written and acted very well. His character's transformation from an officer of the Army of France to an officer of the Army of Vichy France captures the attitude of such officers perfectly.
Speaking of Greenstreet's performances, he did a great job in ACROSS THE PACIFIC as the Japanophile operative on the eve of the USA's formal invitation into WW II.
The 1931 THE MALTESE FALCON, with Austrian-born, New York City-raised, "Latin Lover" Ricardo Cortez playing Sam Spade is great fun.
The entire set is excellent. Great job, Warner Bros.

#11 of 21 OFFLINE   george kaplan

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Posted October 25 2006 - 08:25 AM

I love all of these (though certainly none measure up to the Maltese Falcon) with the exception of All Through the Night, which falls flat for me.
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#12 of 21 ONLINE   John Hodson

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Posted October 25 2006 - 10:39 PM

I'm not usually this anal about packaging, but I'm spitting blood now. The set arrived this morning and no slipcase for the 'Falcon' three-disc. As said, some folks have been getting one and other haven't - it's either a blunder at Warners end, or the accountants stepped in to save a few cents. The box is quite clearly manufactured to take one; the cases rattle around instead of sliding comfortably into place and the whole box - even in the plastic wrap - is bowed due to the slack space.

I'm with you Herb, this is one of the all-time great films, but the aesthetic presentation is a little cheap.
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#13 of 21 OFFLINE   Anthony Neilson

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Posted October 25 2006 - 11:30 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Hodson
I'm not usually this anal about packaging, but I'm spitting blood now. The set arrived this morning and no slipcase for the 'Falcon' three-disc. As said, some folks have been getting one and other haven't - it's either a blunder at Warners end, or the accountants stepped in to save a few cents. The box is quite clearly manufactured to take one; the cases rattle around instead of sliding comfortably into place and the whole box - even in the plastic wrap - is bowed due to the slack space.

I'm with you Herb, this is one of the all-time great films, but the aesthetic presentation is a little cheap.

Agreed John. Funnily enough, I got mine this morning - (wonder if we used the same retailer; if so, why did they take so untypically long?) - and have the same problem.

There's no doubt in my mind that this is a balls-up by Warners. The box-cover shows the slipcase quite clearly on the back. And have you noticed that the sleeve for MF disc one has the sleeve for discs 2 and 3 redundantly printed on the reverse side? Total cock-up.

I doubt very much that it's penny-pinching. That will only come into play if Warners refuses to rectify the matter. Sadly, living in the UK, we won't benefit from any such offer but it would be nice if they made a gesture to R1 at least.
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#14 of 21 ONLINE   John Hodson

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Posted October 25 2006 - 11:41 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony Neilson
Agreed John. Funnily enough, I got mine this morning - (wonder if we used the same retailer; if so, why did they take so untypically long?) - and have the same problem.

'Untypically'; can only be Movietytme Posted Image . I haven't even removed the plastic wrap; I've emailed them to see if there is anything they can do at their end, though I don't hold out much hope.

Content is the thing, but this somehow knocks a little gloss off what should have been release of the year.
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#15 of 21 OFFLINE   Anthony Neilson

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Posted October 26 2006 - 02:18 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Hodson
'Untypically'; can only be Movietytme Posted Image . I haven't even removed the plastic wrap; I've emailed them to see if there is anything they can do at their end, though I don't hold out much hope.

Content is the thing, but this somehow knocks a little gloss off what should have been release of the year.

Movietyme, indeed. I forget that we can mention their names around here. Good luck with the e-mail - they never respond to any I send.

I might try to get a slipcase off Warner UK when they release it here.

(By the way, John - thanks for all your work around the various sites notifying us of upcoming releases. It's really useful.)
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#16 of 21 ONLINE   John Hodson

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Posted October 26 2006 - 02:37 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony Neilson
(By the way, John - thanks for all your work around the various sites notifying us of upcoming releases. It's really useful.)

Ta Posted Image
So many films, so little time...
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#17 of 21 ONLINE   John Hodson

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Posted October 26 2006 - 03:41 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony Neilson
Movietyme, indeed. I forget that we can mention their names around here. Good luck with the e-mail - they never respond to any I send.

I've just had a response from them which says, basically, well, this is how they were sent to us, they are all like that so hard luck.

Until Warners actually hold their hands up and says this is their balls up, I think we're screwed on the slipcase front. Which is a shame.
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#18 of 21 OFFLINE   CraigF

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Posted October 28 2006 - 02:09 PM

I don't have anything constructive or new to say, just got my set yesterday.

But kudos to amazon.com for getting it here (to Canada) so fast, took about half the usual time!

Perhaps if the Maltese Falcon discs were in their proper case, Warner's shrink-wrapping of the set wouldn't have squashed/wrinkled the box so much...tacky job there. Posted Image [Not nearly as stupid-looking as one snapper case (in Canada) in a Hitchcock set of 8 other keepcases, I must admit...they didn't fix that "problem" either.]

I got the Wayne/Ford set in the same shipment. Pretty obvious to me who gets the higher rating at Warner, if packaging is to be judged (and I like slim cases FWIW, and discs rarely come loose in them when shipping). So much for the "All-time #1 Male Star" as Warner quotes AFI re Bogie. I'd rather watch Bogie than JW any day, but JW was in some pretty good movies too!

#19 of 21 OFFLINE   Robert Crawford

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Posted October 28 2006 - 02:35 PM

Jeez, you guys kill me with this packaging stuff. Now, Warner is dissing Bogey for the Duke. I sympathize for those that really care about dvd packaging, but let's not go overboard in assuming the reasoning behind it.




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#20 of 21 OFFLINE   CraigF

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Posted October 28 2006 - 02:46 PM

Sorry Crawdaddy. I am one of those people who always says I don't care about the packaging too! I just don't like to see the packaging I *do* get look physically nasty, that's all. I am just doing a comparison of numerous Warner sets, since I had to rearrange my racks to fit these new ones in... It is hard not to notice some things. FWIW, I'd much rather have lousy packaging with great movies than GREAT packaging with lousy movies (way too many of those to mention).

Yeah, mea culpa, just joining the dark side for a few minutes...

Edit: In my own (legally allowed!...still, I think) defense, on further consideration (do I sound like a lawyer yet?...I'm trying to pull flysh!t out of pepper here, give me a break), I should say WB thought it worthwhile to put in a carboard spacer to the JW/JF set to prevent shrinkwrap scrunching. And the people who are supporting the financial viability of the less "desirable" titles by purchasing sets should not feel slighted. Come on, how much could that TMF cardboard wrapper have cost?, people who bought sets and didn't get the "whole package" are IMO not unreasonably slightly miffed. This is a change from what WB has done in the past, people who bought sets were previously doubly blessed, and I hope this instance is an anomaly. I want to contribute to the others to help make sure that WB knows that this was not a good PR decision, no matter how minor they considered it. Even though I bought the set knowing it, damn, I ain't helping the cause, am I?? Posted Image


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