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2006 Film List


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#141 of 155 Adam_S

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Posted February 22 2007 - 08:04 AM

Babel - Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image (8 of 10)

Superb film from Gonzalez-Innaritu, but it's not quite great. Babel tells the story of how the details of a tragedy tie together disparate threads that span the world, showing that even the smallest event has connections thoroughly globalized. A little bit six degress of Kevin Bacon, Babel is deliberately powerful on an emotional level while subtly addressing the gamut of modern social issues: Class, race, childhood/adolescence/adulthood/maturity, disability, family & culture, and the intertwined relationship of the first, second and third world. With none of the crassness or assaulting dialogue of Crash, nevertheless Babel suffers from the same contrived sensibility in addition to seemingly intelligent people occasionally acting in tremendously stupid ways that betrays their earlier characterizations.

The most consistent characters are the victims of the tragedy, Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett, I don't think they had names, they might, but they did a good job of playing Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett as a long time married, super rich, ridiculously successful couple trying to recover from the SIDS death of their youngest, when tragedy strikes them again.

The most powerful story, is that of Chieko, a deaf-mute Japanese girl played brilliantly by Rinko Kikuchi in the film's strongest performance. Kikuchi is ruthlessly exploited by the filmmakers and forced to address and overcome Japanese cultural taboos against genital nudity/exposure and the disabled. The character of Chieko, a highschool aged teenager, is struggling with surging hormones and the frustration of being unable to communicate with or date boys. Every male she comes across that is not her father is a potential lover and as she haphazardly moves through the city she spirals further downwards, towards death or perhaps rebirth. Chieko, more than any other character, represents the dichotomy of despair and hope that the film depends upon. Gonzalez-Innaritu uses her story as the strong connecting thread to hold the film together, despite the most tenuous of connections to only one of the stories in the film, thematically her story embodies the soul of the film.

Equally powerful is the story of the instigators of the tragedy, a Moroccan family of farmers. Two boys are given a powerful hunting rifle by their father to stop jackals from savaging their flocks of goats. Being boys, and the younger, rebellious brother possessing a personality designed for good aim, causes the boys to be competitive about their own abilities and the rifles abilities. A morbid curiosity and a stupid game lead to the accidental tragedy that motivates the film; it is this event that results in the eventual destruction of this family as they deal with fear, guilt and the forthcoming fall of the hammer of the brutal Moroccan authorities. The youngest brother, a gifted actor, and powerful presence is one of the most compelling figures of the entire film, unfortunatley their story is dropped rather than resolved.

rounding out the four stories is that of Amelia, Mike and Debbie, the latter are the children of Pitt and Blanchett, Amelia is their Mexican nanny, who has raised the children since birth since their parents can't be bothered with such.

Amelia is trying to get to Mexico for her son's wedding, unfortunately the children's parents have not arranged anyone to watch the children, not even their aunt. after asking her most trusted friends, Amelia takes the children with her, they ride down to Mexico with her nephew, Santiago, a wild 20something, played by Gael Garcia Bernal--someone who bizarrely thinks that instead of telling the truth they should pretend the white bread kids are her actual neices and nephews.

They have a good time at the wedding, and after much celebration head back towards San Diego, at the border, Santiago panics and makes a series of bad decisions, followed by Amelia making worse decisions. The resolution of this story is the most powerful tragedy of all and there is little hope offered for the future.

Overall Babel is one of the year's strongest films, but it's almost too serious for it's own good, too convinced of it's own importance--and that, more than anything is what holds Babel back from repeat viewings or achieving true cinematic greatness, it is a work of the head more than of the heart, the passion feels as much like frustration and anger than the passion of telling a superb story, nevertheless, this is one of the year's best films.
 

#142 of 155 Brook K

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Posted February 23 2007 - 11:04 AM

Blood Diamond (2006, Edward Zwick)
Mixing powerful drama, romance, and a social message in classic Hollywood fashion, director Edward Zwick has created a superior piece of entertainment. Leonardo Di Caprio continues his evolution into an adult actor and turns in perhaps his best performance, commanding our attention in true leading man fashion. It's also nice to see Jennifer Connelly is eating again, and more than capable of delivering nuanced work despite the rather limited scope of her character. Lastly, Djimon Hounsou is impressively dynamic as his character serves as the film's lynchpin. The film's message may seem trite in comparison to the complexity of the problem of "blood diamonds" but better the issue receive some attention in the popular media rather than remaining buried. - B+

Changing Times (2004, André Téchiné)
Set in Algeria, the film tells the story of a man who ostensibly comes to Tangiers to work, but is really there to find his lost love who he hasn't seen in 30 years. Meanwhile, she is living in a loveless marriage to an alcoholic doctor. At the same time as the man from her past visits, her son also comes from Paris, bringing a woman and their child. The woman has a drug problem and is trying to meet her sister, who lives in Tangiers and is living a hand-to-mouth existence working at McDonalds. Everyone in the film is searching for something elusive.

The real attraction here are the older man and woman roles played by Gerard DePardieu and Catherine Deneuve. Onscreen together, they are a joy to watch as their characters stumble and meander toward renewing their relationship. Unfortunately the film tries to juggle many story threads, which takes us away from this central relationship and gives screentime to far less compelling events. In another movie, the problems of Deneuve's husband, played by the always watchable Gilbert Melki would be worth watching on their own. The story of Deneuve's son, a closeted homosexual who really came to Algeria to visit his boyfriend, takes on a different context. In this film though, they are a mere distraction we'd rather fast forward through to get back to watching Deneuve and DePardieu. - B-

Night at the Museum (2006, Shawn Levy)
While Ben Stiller's style of humor does not make him the best choice for lead in a children's film, Night at the Museum is cheery and entertaining enough to be sucessful at what it wants to do. Once we get past the perfunctory and bland setup, we are whisked into a relatively exciting world with plenty of action and laughs when Stiller isn't trying too hard to crack jokes. - B
2002 Sight & Sound Challenge: 321  Last Watched: L'enfance Nue
Last 8 Films Watched: In the Loop - A- / It Might Get Loud - B+ / What Just Happened? - B / Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs - C- / Drums Along the Mohawk - A- / Punisher War Zone - B+ / Moon - C+ / A Man For All Seasons - B+

#143 of 155 Brook K

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Posted February 23 2007 - 08:37 PM

Volver (2006, Pedro Almodovar)
Almodovar's latest is another celebration of the resiliency of women. Penelope Cruz is luminous and displays an inner fire that she doesn't show in her Hollywood work. While the story is thinner than his last few films, his absolute command of the medium, his inimitable energy and style, his ability to find the humor in virtually any situation, and his knack for obtaining wonderful performances from his actresses makes this another wonderful experience from one of our greatest living filmmakers. - B+

Closes out my movies seen in 2006.
2002 Sight & Sound Challenge: 321  Last Watched: L'enfance Nue
Last 8 Films Watched: In the Loop - A- / It Might Get Loud - B+ / What Just Happened? - B / Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs - C- / Drums Along the Mohawk - A- / Punisher War Zone - B+ / Moon - C+ / A Man For All Seasons - B+

#144 of 155 Adam_S

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Posted March 01 2007 - 06:12 AM

The Prestige - 8 of 10 - Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

The Prestige is a story about English stage magicians at the turn of the century (1900). Christian Bale plays Alfred Borden, Hugh Jackman plays Robert Angier, both are apprentice magicians under the tutelage of Cutter, played by Michael Caine.

During one of the shows in which they are the 'plants' the trick goes wrong, Angier's wife dies and Borden leaves the company to study magic and misdirection on his own. Angier is obsessed with Borden's role in the accident and attempts to ruin his career. In the meantime Borden has fallen in love and married himself, further enraging Angier. As Angier reaches the heights of fame, Borden evens the score, and Angier brings in a new assistent, Olivia, played by Scarlett Johannson, in the meantime, Borden attempts his own masterpiece, which Angier promptly improves and steals, this sparks a new rivalry that results in Angier traveling thousands of miles to discover what Borden has discovered. As his quest continues, the edge of the supernatural perhaps draws closer or at least that is how we perceive it.

spoilers to discuss the rest of the film

I'm not convinced that real magic was used, I still think Angier was using some trick, some illusion, but I suppose he is not. I was thoroughly underwhelmed to discover real magic was used, and felt quite tricked and annoyed because of it. Oh, right, it's not 'magic,' it's 'science', well nonsense babble by an old man, Tesla, makes it more magic than science in my book--just because he's based on a real historical scientist doesn't make it more valid or realistic, another problem with the film, putting the magic within the trappings of science is just frustrating for some reason. I suppose instead of annoyed with the film I was supposed to feel all horrified and amazed at the tortuous horror that Angier put himself through. I was not because the ending was inconsistent with the rest of the film I just didn't process it in the ideal manner, I was more interested in the twins concept, that alone was enough to sustain the movie.

Overall the film was superb, but perhaps a little too long, perhaps it shows a little too much of the prestige at the very end, a good magician doesn't reveal his tricks, and I think a little misdirection at the end would have been a superb touch rather than a reveal.

Also, the structure of the story was simply awkward and while handled brilliantly, it was damn near impossible to overcome, better writing could fix that, but so much plot was crammed into the pages that creating smooth transitions and assisting the viewer to follow intuitively simply was not up to par with the rest of the film, the structure is the weakest part of the film, imo.

Oh, and damn near perfect on every single technical level, an astounding film on those aspects, the story and in some ways the directing doesn't quite reach those heights however.

Shut up and Sing - 8 of 10 - Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

The Dixie Chicks were a popular act in country music, they were not particularly memorable, a few good songs, nothing great. What was remarkable about them as artists is they were the only platinum artist in the music industry at the forefront of advocating for legislation of fair financial (royalty) treatment of writers (and performers) who are not platinum sellers. They were crazy enough to think that writers should get 8 or 10 cents per song, rather than 1 or 2. That's what they've always been memorable to me for.

Come early 2003, the Dixie Chicks are getting ready to start their biggest world tour yet. They've damn near crossed over in popularity and the entire tour sold out in days. At the first show on the tour, in London, Natalie Maines said, "We're ashamed the President of the United States is from Texas."
This was in early March, the invasion of Iraq had not yet begun, just that day, London had experienced it's biggest rally of all time as citizens march in opposition to the war. The Dixie Chicks are from Texas and did not support an unprovoked attack (no proof) against what was obviously an uninvolved country, even then.

Enter a firestorm of protests in the United States. It seems women expressing a negative opinion isn't allowed if you belong to the country music genre--after all, they'll perfectly happily accept drug abusers, convicted wife beaters, drunks etc without the slightest problem. But the Dixie Chicks were cast out, radio stations stopped playing their records and set up barrells for people to stop buy, trash their old albums and burn them, stomp on them and what not. It was as complete a renunciation as could be managed by the entire industry. The dixie chicks continued their world tour and eventually returned for the american leg of the tour. Every concert was sold out, every concert had protests, and for the most part, people wanted to (and loved) hearing their music. But the actions of a few extremists controlled their ability to get radio play.

The chicks had planned to take a two year hiatus following the tour to raise their kids or start families. They took that time as vacation and eventually came back together to write their next record. And they realized they are facing an utterly unique situation in setting their group up, writing the album, selling it without radio, and promoting a concert tour without radio. They manage to tackle each of these obstacles somewhat successfully, but the finest result is the actual album, it goes without saying that this is their best album, in fact it's an important piece of art and one of the best country albums of all time. They created their first masterpiece, and a fine testament to the craft of assembling an album and it doesn't even get any radio play, whether or not they successfully make it into the mainstream is where the documentary wears off, but the Chicks' three grammies should be a testament to their success in that arena.

An excellent doc. the footage looks great and it was cleverly assembled, the cutting back and forth between the explosion of controversy and the creative process of writing the new album at first annoyed me but now I think it's inspired. An excellent doc I could watch several times.

Stranger than Fiction - 10 of 10 Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image
 

#145 of 155 Adam_S

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Posted March 11 2007 - 06:35 AM

I've not yet written a review for Stranger than Fiction, but I'll try to get around to it.

Sherrybaby - Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image 7 of 10

Quite literally the sister film to Half Nelson (girl druggy instead of guy), Sherrybaby is a much better movie. Maggie Gyllenhaal is excellent.

Sherry has just been released from prison after three years and is on parole. She was a junkie but she's clean for two and a half years now. Her brother and sister in law have been caring for her four year old little girl in the interim and Sherry is both desperate and determined to become a good mother.

Unfortunately Sherry doesn't really know how to be an adult in society, she's still very much an emotional and psychological child even as she is struggling to do what needs to be done to maturely step into a responsible adult role. While her methods at getting what she wants may be quite adult her motives behind them are quite selfish and childish. She's impatient and unwilling to make the sacrifices to prove herself to her family, her parole officer and to society.

Gyllenhaal is brilliant in this role, despite how deeply flawed Sherry is, she creates a real person, mostly because the writer bothered to make her family, particularly her brother and sister in law into real people, it's an excellent bit of writing and very subtly done in creating the core relationships of the film. At the same time the film is a little hamfisted at explaining Sherry's past and her current addictions, but while over the top it is handled better than the limited emotional range of Half Nelson and the film asks for and earns a more subtle and complicated look at addiction and family/relationships than the dismay/acceptance that Half Nelson chose. Sherrbaby is much more than that and while it is hard to watch is very much worth watching and a beautiful, heartbreaking story.

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Find Me Guilty - 8 of 10 Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

Sidney Lumet's latest film makes me quite excited for the forthcoming, Before the Devil Knows You're Dead.

Most of Find me Guilty takes place in a courtroom and like Twelve Angry Men, Lumet has absolutely no problem compelling our interest for every second.

this is basically a true story.

Jackie DiNorscio is a drugdealing member of one of the five families. the film opens with his cousin shooting him while he's sleeping. Jackie survive and goes right back to his regular work. He's busted on a sting and sentanced to thirty years in jail, because of a nonexistent effort by his lawyer. A few months later, the entire family is rounded up, and the longest criminal trial in history begins, Jackie is one of the twenty defendents, there are 76 charges and all of the rest of his family has their own individual lawyers, but Jackie decides to defend himself, he was screwed by his last lawyer, afterall. The family, the defending lawyers, and the prosecuting lawyers are not sure what to expect. Jackie is crude but endearing, fond of cracking jokes and not very good at following the rules of questioning and the court, he'll either be the complete downfall of his entire family or may be the trump card that saves some, or all, of them.

Vin Diesel is brilliant in this role, one that finally gives him a chance to stretch and display the range of his acting chops, and he is really damned good.

Also outstanding is the always great Peter Dinklage, one of the best supporting actors currently working today, up there with John C Reilley and Philip Seymour Hoffman. I really hope he is cast as Tyrion Lannister in HBO's upcoming version of A song of Ice and Fire, it's a role that was made for him, the best role in the series and one many actors would give their right arm to play, and he would be brilliant as Tyrion.

Great dialogue, elegant camerwork and filled with wonderful character moments, Find Me Guilty rarely stumbles, it's not a masterpiece, but it's as solid and delightful a film as you could ask for, Very entertaining and highly recommended.
 

#146 of 155 Adam_S

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Posted March 23 2007 - 08:32 AM

Casino Royale - 9 of 10

one of the best bonds full review later.

Adam
 

#147 of 155 Seth Paxton

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Posted March 26 2007 - 08:09 AM

Yeah, I really liked Royale too Adam. It drifted into silly a few times, but well short of where they had been taking the series the last 2 decades in that regard.

I like Bond rougher like this, it makes his ability to be charming seem more impressive, shows his range as a spy/killer which is exactly why he's the top dog.


Man, I've been bad about keeping up here. Let's see if I can get it going again. Here's stuff for the last 2 months.

Pan's Labyrinth
9.5 of 10

Really liked it, but it was perhaps a bit too dark/violent for me. It felt like the fantasy section was much more impressive than the WW2 stuff, and that's probably the biggest reason why I couldn't quite see it as a 10. Still I have it as my 3rd best at this point.

The Prestige
9 of 10

I didn't really like what they did with Tesla exactly, but overall I love the theme of competition and outright violence between the 2 magicians, that's a great story angle and provided numerous moments of "I haven't really seen that before" in terms of the story itself (not FX). Like Illusionist it sets a great period mood, but with a better plot. Otherwise the films are very similar and both of high quality (art direction, cinematography, acting). Freaking Bale is the man, great great actor.

The Decent
9 of 10

Wow. I heard good things and it lived up to them. This was a rental that's now a purchase. Great color cinematography, with color used within the story (accurate reasons for varying) while also totally thematic, great for establishing moods, and even separating plot lines. Solid performances, great horror moments built on mood and threat more than gore. Classic horror film IMO. (talking about UK/uncut version that is)

Babel
8.5 of 10

I would have loved the film if it hadn't repeated itself over and over. Scenes failed to continue to say anything new after the first hour and I started to wonder at hour 2 why anything was going forward. It needed to be cut back badly, leave them wanting more. If they'd done that it would have been more in the hunt for the top prize I think.

Letters from Iwo Jima
9 of 10

Not quite the direction of Flags, but with a much tighter script and a consistant voice. I felt the characters were Americanized and didn't really buy their motivations as intrinsically Japanese, but within the context of a STORY everything was fine - motivations, character interactions, choices of characters, etc. Both this and Flags were a little dry as well, not as emotional as you would expect for this content. Not a miss by Clint, but not what he could have done with the concept either.

Inconvenient Truth
8 of 10

A little dry overall, but a well organized doc that leads the viewer along in stages. One problem I had was that it switched back and forth between being about Gore and being about global warming. I know he's telling the tale, but at times it was almost a political ad than a doc on even just his life and certainly not g.w. But it was filmed beautifully and they really capture the power of Gore's live presentation. Not a doc to knock your socks off (and considering the issue it should have been) but pretty good.

Click
3 of 10

Hamfisted theme really hurts the film, the character is driven to his "learned lesson" in a very forced (storytelling) manner. Reminiscent of The Family Man in that regard. Oddly they went way short on what the best concept of the film was, a remote that controlled life. You get perhaps 4-5 really good jokes out of that and spend most of the time on moralizing. Blah, pick a genre and get in there. Stranger than Fiction backed away from being silly comedy despite the equally implausible plot device, and as a committed dramedy it worked much better while containing more laughs even.

Come on Sandler, you can do better than this crap lately. I don't need serious either, but just tighten up the comedy a little. The stuff is starting to feel like a rehash each time out.

#148 of 155 Seth Paxton

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Posted March 26 2007 - 08:26 AM

I also bumped down The Departed and Flushed Away (both 10 to 9.5) after repeat viewings.

A decent amount of good films this year, but not really much in the way of classic/great films. For me Children of Men was the only one. A few of the others that grabbed me were a bit too flawed to totally love (The Fountain, The Decent, Manderlay, Miami Vice), but ultimately I will probably revisit them over some of the other top films of the year.

#149 of 155 Adam_S

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Posted April 29 2007 - 07:14 PM

Notes on a Scandal - 3 of 10

sharp script, bad material. horrid melodrama with great cast.

modern version of bad Bette Davis vehicle.
 

#150 of 155 Brook K

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Posted April 30 2007 - 05:49 AM

Three Times (2005, Hsiao-Hsien Hou)
As the name suggests, this Taiwanese film relates 3 stories, each featuring the same lead actors. The first, and best, A Time to Love, is set during the 60's. Reminiscent of Wong Kar-Wai or Edward Yang, it is the sweetly romantic tale of a couple falling in love in a pool-hall to the tune of period music (including The Beatles "Rain"). The second chapter, A Time for Freedom, is set in the early 1900's. Here the story is about the impossible love between a lady and a monk, amidst an atmosphere of political upheaval. Unfortunately, the political melodrama overwhelms the romance, though the film is interesting technically with its use of intertitles and other silent film techniques.

The final story, A Time for Youth, is the least interesting, as it relates yet another take on modern youth disconnected from each other despite a vast array of technology designed to encourage communication. Overall I found the film worthwhile, especially the first story, if not among the director's best. - B

Time to Leave (2005, Francois Ozon)
The latest from one of France's most interesting current directors, Time to Leave is about a fashion photographer who finds out he has terminal cancer. His way of dealing with the inevitable is to sever his relationships with anyone or anything he cared about, excepting his "soulmate" grandmother (glowingly played by Jeanne Moreau). This is, of course, emotionally wrenching for the people around him, but is the only way he can deal with what is happening to him. Told with a high degree of empathy, Ozon's film is a moving study of humanity, love, and mortality. - B+
2002 Sight & Sound Challenge: 321  Last Watched: L'enfance Nue
Last 8 Films Watched: In the Loop - A- / It Might Get Loud - B+ / What Just Happened? - B / Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs - C- / Drums Along the Mohawk - A- / Punisher War Zone - B+ / Moon - C+ / A Man For All Seasons - B+

#151 of 155 Adam_S

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Posted May 02 2007 - 07:42 PM

Deja Vu - 7 of 10

What the hell? This was a tremendous, 9of10 movie until the final minute or so. I found the ending extremely unsatisfying, I'd be okay with ambiguous, but what they went with was too damn teasing, and I wanted some resolution to the 'special surveillance unit', I'd have been happier with a 'Psycho' style ending that explained a couple things.

And what the hell up was with the wonkiness of the explosion at the house in the bayou? It ran backwards in time just after Doug and Claire jump out of the house, and it appears that creepy bad guy caused the explosion to keep it from engulfing them.

The gun battle was cool, but a bit unsatisfying resolution to it, everything else was handled perfectly, up and until the final minute or two which might read fine in a script, but the performances suggest that a lot more is going on, that Doug has some knowledge of what's going on, or something. Posted Image

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#152 of 155 Seth Paxton

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Posted July 31 2007 - 06:57 AM

That's on my Netflix soon, guess I'll prepare for a letdown ending.

Pursuit of Happiness
9 of 10

I have to say that I was concerned about spending 2 hours watching a guy suffer over and over, but for me this film was really uplifting. I came from somewhat similar circumstances so I really related to their situation. The acting is very strong and Will's kid deserves the praise he got. It's great to see Will in more rewarding roles like this, less showy but ultimately a more impressive effort.

The tension was well-paced and honestly every step felt as real as it was supposed to be, rather than ramped up drama. The looking for his shoe moment, for example, felt completely real and frantic rather than over the top.

Obviously this true story ends with a happy ending, with him making it, otherwise it wouldn't be a story (at least not one I could bear), but for me it felt earned by the character every step of the way as well as constantly in jeopardy of not working out.


Other DVD viewings from the last few months that I didn't get back here and mention...

Apocalypto
9 of 10

Beautifully shot, incredible art direction. Only drawback is Mel's infatuation with torture/violence and a story that's a bit simple and classical H'wood narrative (ie not particularly clever or subtle)

Blood Diamond
9 of 10

Brilliant work by Leo, certainly worth the Oscar consideration, strong film overall. Like Apocalypto it sometimes follows script conventions too closely, for example the ending. But mostly outstanding.

Curse of the Golden Flower
7 of 10

Beautiful but just too self-indulgent on his part. The charm of stuff like Flying Daggers or Hero is lost here.

Employee of the Month
3 of 10

Actually could have been fun with the corny premise, but mostly it settles for being schlock. Not the kind of project Cook should have gone with.

Happy Feet
4 of 10

Bizarre use of CGI and mostly feels like it's just cribbing from what Moulin Rouge did, except MR had a true vision and had a real point to the gimmick musical blending. Here it's forced, and then the ending...the subtle manipulation of a bat upside the head.

The Holiday
5 of 10

Not sure 5 is even fair. It's so cliched and manipulative, as well as predictable and disjointed. I guess some of the acting is about all that saved it for me.

Invincible
8 of 10

No surprise to the story and it's standard sports underdog makes good stuff, but Wahlberg continues to deliver good performances and I loved Kinnear in the Vermeil subplot.

Marie Antoinette
9 of 10

More of what made Sophia's Lost in Translation so good. Sure she's stylish but it has a point and does apply to the character. It was consistantly beautifully shot and works very well as a character piece.

Night at the Museum
2.5 of 10

Just not funny. Could have been, should have been, but wasn't. Waste of a brilliant story idea. Robin Williams continues to be a warning sign rather than a selling point.

Open Season
6 of 10

Mundane animal animation story using the cliched fish out of water plotline. Funny enough at times to be mildly pleasant, but mostly forgettable.

Snakes on a Plane
5.5 of 10

Almost a good idea. Back off the stupid CGI work and CGI-driven scenes and you've almost got a great popcorn action/thriller. People scoffed at the concept, but actually that's one of the best parts of the film. It's the production that ends up letting it down. Didn't someone else have this in development and ended up giving up when he was asked to tone it down? I remember something like that being part of the problem.

Tenacious D
6 of 10

Great at times, but like the TV show it's very hit and miss. I wish there were more strong songs in the film and it's a shame that the best song is left for the credit roll (The Metal).


All of those updates have my 2006 film count up to 71, only about 30 shy of where I hope to get. Not as bad as it first looked for me. Posted Image

#153 of 155 Seth Paxton

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Posted July 31 2007 - 07:05 AM

I also edited my list again. I brought down some 9s into the 8.5 range after rewatching or rethinking (Dreamgirls, Thank You for Smoking, Brick). I keep inching Miami Vice toward the top, with it at #4 now. I'm almost ready to place it above Departed even.

Oh, almost forgot, I have a new #2 film, my only other 10 of the year...
Volver
10 of 10

Once again Almadovor brings a brilliant melding of dry family drama and crazy, almost soap opera level, conflict-enducing circumstances to the screen. You read the description and foresee some boring film of daughters talking about what they don't like about each other or something, and it couldn't be further from what the film actually is. Murder, ghosts, incest, it's freaking Shakespeare.

And of course his eye behind the camera is just captivating. The art direction, cinematography and selection of shots making those most of all of it is incredible. Plus Cruz....oh mama. Outstanding performance and man is she smoking hot in this film.

#154 of 155 Adam_S

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Posted August 21 2007 - 04:29 AM

I've a new number one for the year, and my second 10 of 10 of the year, maybe the only one if I downgrade Stranger than Fiction (which I don't think I'll do) - Sweet Land.
 

#155 of 155 Brook K

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Posted August 21 2007 - 10:06 AM

I dug Inland Empire a great deal (seriously Oscar-worthy performance from Laura Dern). The atmosphere and style are terrific; I really think Lynch could make one of the greatest horror films of all time if he was interested in doing that. But some weaknesses in the ending and it's almost bludgeoning length just keep it from unseating Apocalypto and making my top 10.

I liked the direction and loved both the production design and the early orphanage scenes in Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, I also wasn't bothered as some were by Dustin Hoffman. However, I was lukewarm on the lead's performance and the film lost me at the climax. It just didn't grab me enough throughout to make that large a leap at the end. I gave it a B.
2002 Sight & Sound Challenge: 321  Last Watched: L'enfance Nue
Last 8 Films Watched: In the Loop - A- / It Might Get Loud - B+ / What Just Happened? - B / Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs - C- / Drums Along the Mohawk - A- / Punisher War Zone - B+ / Moon - C+ / A Man For All Seasons - B+