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For those who question weather there is a gain to be had with older movies in HD


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#1 of 6 OFFLINE   ppltd

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Posted September 25 2006 - 12:47 PM

Here is some interesting information on the relative h Resolution of 35mm theatrical film. Understand when reading, that while film stock has vastly improved over the las 40 years (less grain, better color fedility, less 'strech', the resolution has pretty much stayed what it is. This should help put to bed the question of whether older films will show any benefit on HD.

BTW, all you have to do is watch The Searchers to see this proved out.

Quote:
From Videotape Products, Inc. What is the spatial resolution of 35mm Motion Picture film?
The spatial resolution of the active area of standard 35mm Motion Picture Camera Color Negative was, prior to Kodak's introduction of Vision stock, measured as 80 line pairs per millimeter, or approximately 167 pixels per millimeter in any direction. The horizontal and vertical pixel count depend upon the camera aperture (e.g., there is no increase in horizontal pixel count due to anamorphic lens image compression onto the camera negative). 35mm film negative can easily be rated at as high a resolution as 4096x2987 for Academy Aperture. The "2K" level is considered half resolution of 2048x1493 for Academy Aperture. The visual effects industry has been working at the "2K" level for years, usually with less vertical resolution due to the masked horizontal aspect ratios the filmmakers have chosen of 1.85 or larger (a horizontal rectangle). Because of film to film generation loss, poor projection quality (from such factors as simple as turning up the lamp brightness on the projectors), and forced limited print contrast range of from 6 to 8 stops, the 1920x1080 8 or 10 bit capabilities of high definition video converted to 35mm print film can be indistinguishable and thus quite useful for mainstream filmmakers who still want a feature film print release.

For more technical info, see http://www.vtpcorp.com/htm/vidfilm.htm
Thomas Eisenmann(Last updated 09/30/11)

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#2 of 6 OFFLINE   Robert Harris

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Posted September 25 2006 - 01:16 PM

VTP is a superb company, which has been servicing the industry with quality equipment for quite a while. The information being offered, however, is angled toward a purpose, which does not tell the entire story.

What they are saying is that 2k is fine for new digital production...

and toward the production of 2k derived printing negs.

It is NOT fine, however, for use with film based productions, which will at some point have to be brought back to film.

This is an incorrect venue for the information, which is being purposed in other directions. We're in an apples and oranges situation, which is not being properly expressed in this thread.

RAH

"All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible. This I did." T.E. Lawrence


#3 of 6 OFFLINE   Sami Kallio

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Posted September 26 2006 - 04:25 AM

One only needs to watch some of the older movies on HD broadcast and the improvement is obvious. I just watched parts of Chinatown in HD and it looks pretty damn good, even the old Eastwood spaghetti westerns look noticiably better, not to speak of Blazing Saddles in HD-DVD.

All of a sudden old classics became much more enjoyable, even to those who haven't really cared for them in the past.

#4 of 6 OFFLINE   Roger Mathus

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Posted September 26 2006 - 04:36 AM

Any evaluation of Adventures of Robin Hood released today in HD DVD. I have not seen any reviews yet.

#5 of 6 OFFLINE   Mark Zimmer

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Posted September 26 2006 - 08:42 AM

To my eye, Grand Prix looks even better than The Searchers but is still 40 years old. Haven't seen Robin Hood yet though.

#6 of 6 OFFLINE   ppltd

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Posted September 26 2006 - 08:59 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Zimmer
To my eye, Grand Prix looks even better than The Searchers but is still 40 years old. Haven't seen Robin Hood yet though.

I have Grand Prix on order. If my memory isn't faulty, I am pretty sure that I saw this film in 70mm in Chicago when it was released. Looking forward to owning it in HD.

Thomas Eisenmann
Thomas Eisenmann(Last updated 09/30/11)

Blu-Ray Collection  DVD Collection, Numerous BD players,

LG 55LX6500 55-Inch 3D 1080p 240 Hz LED

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1124 BDs and going up, 1028 - DVDs and going down.






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