Jump to content



Sign up for a free account to remove the pop-up ads

Signing up for an account is fast and free. As a member you can join in the conversation, enter contests and remove the pop-up ads that guests get. Click here to create your free account.

Photo
- - - - -

Military Jargon: What Distance is a "Click" ?


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
12 replies to this topic

#1 of 13 OFFLINE   Arthur S

Arthur S

    Screenwriter



  • 2,572 posts
  • Join Date: Jul 02 1999

Posted September 11 2006 - 12:00 PM

I've seen countless movies where military talk about such and such a target being so many "clicks" away. No one has ever been able to tell me what distance a "click" is.

Anyone?

#2 of 13 OFFLINE   Chu Gai

Chu Gai

    Lead Actor



  • 7,270 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 29 2001

Posted September 11 2006 - 12:22 PM

1 kilometer.

#3 of 13 OFFLINE   Henry Gale

Henry Gale

    Producer



  • 4,633 posts
  • Join Date: Jul 10 1999

Posted September 11 2006 - 12:37 PM

Alittle more detail:


U.S. military slang for the kilometer (about 0.621 mile). Also spelled klick or klik. This unit became popular during the Vietnam War, but it was invented by U.S. troops in Germany during the 1950s. Occasionally it was used as a non-metric unit equal to 1000 yards (0.9144 kilometer).

BTW..thanks for asking Arthur. I spent 3 years in the Corps, 1 in Nam...and never had a clue what a "click" was. Posted Image
"I was born to ramble, born to rove
Some men are searchin for the Holy Grail
But there ain't nothin sweeter 
Than riden' the rails."
-Tom Waits-

#4 of 13 OFFLINE   Shaughan

Shaughan

    Stunt Coordinator



  • 131 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 15 2004

Posted September 11 2006 - 12:44 PM

I think the term "CLICK" came from the fact that 1 click on the standard distance measuring caliper was 1 kilometer.

#5 of 13 OFFLINE   Arthur S

Arthur S

    Screenwriter



  • 2,572 posts
  • Join Date: Jul 02 1999

Posted September 12 2006 - 09:19 PM

Thanks to all. Especially to Henry Gale.

Now I know it is either one kilo or 1,000 yards, depending on what they want it to be in any particular setting Posted Image

#6 of 13 OFFLINE   Christ Reynolds

Christ Reynolds

    Producer



  • 3,597 posts
  • Join Date: May 06 2002

Posted September 13 2006 - 05:24 PM

urban dictionary is good for stuff like this.

CJ
And then when I feel so stuffed I can't eat anymore, I just use the restroom! And then I CAN eat more!

#7 of 13 OFFLINE   Yee-Ming

Yee-Ming

    Producer



  • 4,330 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 04 2002
  • Real Name:Yee Ming Lim

Posted September 13 2006 - 06:24 PM

I would've thought by now it always means 1 kilometre. Is 1,000 yards as a measure ever used anymore, if ever?

Also, at least to me, "1 kilo" would mean a kilogram (which is about 2.2 lbs); when referring to distance it's either "1km", sometimes "1k", and if in the military the point of this thread, "1 click".

#8 of 13 OFFLINE   Arthur S

Arthur S

    Screenwriter



  • 2,572 posts
  • Join Date: Jul 02 1999

Posted September 13 2006 - 09:05 PM

Yee-Ming

I was mostly teasing about 1,000 yards, but when you are dealing with Hollywood, anything is possible.

Yeah, I thought about using "kilo" after I wrote it but figured that for this purpose it would pass muster Posted Image

Next time I'll use 1km.

#9 of 13 OFFLINE   Keith Paynter

Keith Paynter

    Screenwriter



  • 1,830 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 16 1999

Posted September 14 2006 - 07:30 PM

Arthur, yards is a Imperial measurement, metres a Metric measurement, and their lengths differ.
I don't like SPAM!

#10 of 13 OFFLINE   Sami Kallio

Sami Kallio

    Screenwriter



  • 1,035 posts
  • Join Date: Jan 06 2004

Posted September 15 2006 - 03:50 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yee-Ming
Also, at least to me, "1 kilo" would mean a kilogram

That's correct in everyday terminology (technically not).

Just to refresh everyone's memory... Posted Image


10^n Prefiks Symbol
24 yotta Y
21 zetta Z
18 exa E
15 peta P
12 tera T
9 giga G
6 mega M
3 kilo k
2 hekto h
1 deka da

−1 desi d
−2 centi c
−3 milli m
−6 mikro µ
−9 nano n
−12 pico p
−15 femto f
−18 atto a
−21 zepto z
−24 yocto y

#11 of 13 OFFLINE   Scott McGillivray

Scott McGillivray

    Supporting Actor



  • 852 posts
  • Join Date: Sep 20 1999

Posted September 15 2006 - 10:15 AM

*ahem*

"deci" not desi
"micro" not mikro

Prefix

Symbol

Multiplier

Exponential

Yotta

Y

1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000

1024

Zetta

Z

1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000

1021

Exa

E

1,000,000,000,000,000,000

1018

Peta

P

1,000,000,000,000,000

1015

Tera

T

1,000,000,000,000

1012

Giga

G

1,000,000,000

109

Mega

M

1,000,000

106

Kilo

K

1,000

103

Hecto

H

100

102

Deca

Da

10

101



1

100

deci

d

0.1

10¯1

centi

c

0.01

10¯2

milli

m

0.001

10¯3

micro

µ

0.000001

10¯6

nano

n

0.000000001

10¯9

pico

p

0.000000000001

10¯12

femto

f

0.000000000000001

10¯15

atto

a

0.000000000000000001

10¯18

zepto

z

0.000000000000000000001

10¯21

yocto

y

0.000000000000000000000001

10¯24



Note that prefix above the unit are in Upper Case and below the unit are in lower case. So, 20Mg (Megagrams) is VERY different than 20mg (milligrams).

Sorry...could not resist! I am Canadian and have a thing for the Metric system.
Scott A. McGillivray
Vancouver, B.C.

Struggling Actor and Movie Nut!
(Check out my profile on IMDB!)http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1425496/

#12 of 13 OFFLINE   Sami Kallio

Sami Kallio

    Screenwriter



  • 1,035 posts
  • Join Date: Jan 06 2004

Posted September 15 2006 - 11:16 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott McGillivray
*ahem*

"deci" not desi
"micro" not mikro

Actually both are correct. Depends on the language...October, Oktober.

Some of the prefixes are in uppercase but some are not. Kilo is k, not K (as in km, not Km). The ones I listed are correct; K, H and Da are incorrect.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott McGillivray
*Sorry...could not resist! I am Canadian and have a thing for the Metric system.

I'm European, and the correct term is SI, not metric. Posted Image

#13 of 13 OFFLINE   Yee-Ming

Yee-Ming

    Producer



  • 4,330 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 04 2002
  • Real Name:Yee Ming Lim

Posted September 15 2006 - 04:03 PM

When referring to the numbers that are associated with Mega, Giga and Tera, it's "million", "billion" and "trillion". What's the word that's associated with the next one up, Peta? I vaguely recall a "quadrillion". Not that any country's GNP or national budget/debt will approach a quadrillion yet, but sooner or later... and after all supercomputers are already in the "petaflop" range.





Forum Nav Content I Follow