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Any TVs currently on market that accept a 1080p signal?


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57 replies to this topic

#1 of 58 Ted.B

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Posted July 18 2006 - 09:44 AM

I just started looking for a new HDTV but would like something that won't be obsolete in 6 months (since I want to invest in a PS3, etc). But it seems as though most 1080p sets do not accept a 1080p signal - they just upconcert to 1080p. Are there any sets currently (or coming soon) that will have this? I prefer DLP tech but I'm willing to look at all options.

Thanks!

#2 of 58 Alon Goldberg

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Posted July 18 2006 - 09:53 AM

Hi Ted - All major manufacturers will be releasing 1080p models in September, such as the new Sharp Aquos D90U Series and Sony Bravia XBR3 Series.

For DLP's, I see that Samsung has a wide variety of 1080p models available. Other major manufacturers, such as Hitachi and Pioneer may claim 1080p on some models, but are really down scaled to 1366x768, which is very misleading.

#3 of 58 Stevecatch

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Posted July 18 2006 - 10:03 AM

There are lots of rear projection TVs as well as Plasma and LCD TVs that will do a native 1080p.

Off the top of my head here are some of the popular manufacturers:
JVC

Westinghouse

Panasonic

Sharp

Philips

and more are being added everyday. Chances are, you won't find them in your standard retail stores because they are hard to sell, especially since something like 50% of americans think they are watching HDTV when they really aren't. But that's an off-the-top-of-my-head statistic I read like 2 months ago.

Anyhow, yeah, they're out there, but you really gotta look for 'em.

#4 of 58 TonyD

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Posted August 02 2006 - 02:14 PM

good topic.
i was wondering the same thing.

most tvs i see in ads now all say 1080p but i ws pretty sure most of these arent true 1080p.

i have a mits 73713 that i'd like to sell so i can get a more updated set with
1080 apability.

i wonder what the prices will be.
looking at bigger then 60"
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#5 of 58 John Alvarez

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Posted August 02 2006 - 10:34 PM

From what I have read a lot of those sets will display 1080p but have no input for 1080p except the HP micro displays.

#6 of 58 Allan Jayne

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Posted August 03 2006 - 12:40 AM

All non-CRT 1920x1080 TV's must display everything as 1080p and upconvert all source that is not 1080p.

With few exceptions, a 1080p TV without 1080p input is a bad buy. To add insult to injury, a few 1080p TV sets downrez (a de-facto process) 1080i to 540p (sub-hi-def) before scaling up to 1080p. I don't know which ones these are.

Video hints:
http://members.aol.c...ejr/hdtvnot.htm
.

#7 of 58 Sami Kallio

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Posted August 03 2006 - 02:22 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Allan Jayne
AWith few exceptions, a 1080p TV without 1080p input is a bad buy.
1080i input or 1080p input, it doesn't matter, it will be 1080p in the end. If the TV processes it correctly there will be no difference at all.

#8 of 58 Arthur S

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Posted August 03 2006 - 05:09 AM

Sami

The generation of TVs coming out this fall are going to accept 1080P input. Hard to believe this would be happening if there was not a good reason. While most programming might not benefit from 1080P input, I understand that Blu Ray will support 1080P. Sure, 1080P software will be a while, however, buyers are looking to be future ready so they can feel comfortable that their big screen TV purchase will last them a while.

#9 of 58 Sami Kallio

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Posted August 03 2006 - 05:25 AM

For movies it won't make a difference as they are shot 24 frames per second, 1080i60 is more than enough for that. If the TV doesn't do the pulldown correctly there is a minor difference but many do not even see it. So no, 1080p TV with 1080i input is not a bad buy.

If they ever start shooting enough material 60fps then that's another story but I just don't see that happening anytime soon because of cost.

#10 of 58 Brian_Pete

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Posted August 03 2006 - 05:48 AM

FYI. The HP DLP mentioned above has 1080p inputs. Also the Samsung xx87 and xx88 series TVs that came out this summer and the new Sony SXRDs (A2000 and XBR2) that are just now coming out accept 1080p inputs.

#11 of 58 Arthur S

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Posted August 03 2006 - 06:27 AM

Sami

What is it that makes me think that the following quote plainly states that a TV with 1080P input clearly makes a difference? In the August, 2006 issue of Consumer Reports they discuss 1080P input capable TV in the context of testing high def DVD.

"In our side-by-side tests, the HD DVD version of Phantom of the Opera looked much better than its standard DVD version when viewed on a typical HDTV, which used a native resolution technology known as 1080i. But the HD DVD Phantom looked especially sharp and detailed when viewed on a set with 1080P native resolution, a technology on expensive new sets that make the most of HD signals."

Are their video engineers blinded by the hype?

#12 of 58 TonyD

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Posted August 03 2006 - 07:01 AM

well the thread seems to be off topic.

usually this will get a thread closed.

isnt there a thread that already discusses 1080i vs 1080p
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#13 of 58 Sami Kallio

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Posted August 03 2006 - 07:14 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur S
Are their video engineers blinded by the hype?
No but they are viewing it on a set that is 1080i native, not 1080p.

"typical HDTV, which used a native resolution technology known as 1080i"

I think the discussion was on 1080p native sets that accept 1080i but not 1080p. Different sets.

#14 of 58 TonyD

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Posted August 03 2006 - 07:30 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sami Kallio
No but they are viewing it on a set that is 1080i native, not 1080p.

"typical HDTV, which used a native resolution technology known as 1080i"

I think the discussion was on 1080p native sets that accept 1080i but not 1080p. Different sets.

the discussion of this thread is what tv's will accept/input 1080p native and display it native 1080p
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#15 of 58 Sami Kallio

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Posted August 03 2006 - 07:39 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyD
the discussion of this thread is what tv's will accept/input 1080p native and display it native 1080p
True, but someone stated 1080p that doesn't accept 1080p is a bad buy. The original post also gives you the idea that the poster thinks 1080p's that do not accept 1080p are not 1080p sets. In reality there is little to no difference to a set that accepts 1080p signal, and I think that's relevant information in this thread.

#16 of 58 LanceJ

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Posted August 03 2006 - 09:07 PM

Ahhh, the easy breezy days of 25" console TVs and old skool "clicker" remotes, when the big decision was what what finish to get, walnut or dark cherry. And which vacuum tube-equipped set warmed up faster, Zenith, Magnavox or..............

Sorry, I get a little dizzy reading threads like this. Posted Image Posted Image

#17 of 58 John Alvarez

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Posted August 03 2006 - 10:18 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by LanceJ
Ahhh, the easy breezy days of 25" console TVs and old skool "clicker" remotes, when the big decision was what what finish to get, walnut or dark cherry. And which vacuum tube-equipped set warmed up faster, Zenith, Magnavox or..............

Sorry, I get a little dizzy reading threads like this. Posted Image Posted Image

Zenith of course......and I was the clicker.........Posted Image

#18 of 58 Doug Otte

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Posted August 04 2006 - 01:31 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur S
Sami

What is it that makes me think that the following quote plainly states that a TV with 1080P input clearly makes a difference? In the August, 2006 issue of Consumer Reports they discuss 1080P input capable TV in the context of testing high def DVD.

"In our side-by-side tests, the HD DVD version of Phantom of the Opera looked much better than its standard DVD version when viewed on a typical HDTV, which used a native resolution technology known as 1080i. But the HD DVD Phantom looked especially sharp and detailed when viewed on a set with 1080P native resolution, a technology on expensive new sets that make the most of HD signals."

Are their video engineers blinded by the hype?

Well, there should be a difference between a 480p standard DVD upscaled to 1080i, vs. HD DVD viewed at its native resolution of 1080i or 1080p. That comparison between SD DVD vs. HD DVD is specious, but I think I believe it when they say there's a difference between HD DVD viewed at 1080i vs. 1080p. However, we do know that Consumer Reports has to be taken w/ a grain of salt, right? And, I've never seen either 1080i or p, much less compared them, so they could be imagining it.

Doug

#19 of 58 Sami Kallio

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Posted August 04 2006 - 01:35 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Otte
but I think I believe it when they say there's a difference between HD DVD viewed at 1080i vs. 1080p.
I believe it too.

#20 of 58 Arthur S

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Posted August 04 2006 - 03:14 AM

Good. So it would seem like people like Ron Epstein, and other forum administrators who bought the HP 58 or 65 inch 1080P input capable DLP TV's won't have to wait till 60fps material becomes available to enjoy the benefits of their 1080P input TVs. That brings me back to where I started. At the very least, those considering upgrading to HD DVD should think carefully about moving up to a 1080P input capable TV.


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