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Where can I get full-length 35mm movies?


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#1 of 8 OFFLINE   NathanP

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Posted November 12 2001 - 01:50 AM

Am I right when I say that movies now-a-days at a movie theater are seen in 35mm?

Well,
I can't wait for an LCD projector and to add to the experiance of my HT, I will be getting a film projector.

Thing is, I can only find trailers of other movies at places like Ebay.com.

Where can I get FULL length movies, like "The Matrix" or "Star Trek"?

Thanks!

Nathan

[Edited last by NathanP on November 12, 2001 at 08:53 AM]

#2 of 8 OFFLINE   Peter Apruzzese

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Posted November 12 2001 - 03:51 AM

Start out with the magazine The Big Reel. Also, check out the website www.35mmforum.com - you have to register to view the postings. Most recent films can be obtained for around $400-750, depending on the condition and studio. Many classics more than 10-15 years old will go for over $1000, if you can even find them. And, keep this in mind, purchasing and owning these films is not exactly legal. The studios do not sell these prints, the ones on the collector market are usually *obtained* from film shipping depots just before the prints are scheduled to be destroyed after the majority of the theatrical runs are finished. Be advised also that most color films from 1975 to 1983 will have significant color fading problems.
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#3 of 8 OFFLINE   NathanP

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Posted November 12 2001 - 03:53 AM

Ach, nevermind then..

I thught I could get new films for dirt cheap (under $30), I guess I'll forget about purchasing a film projector and just worry about that LCD projector.

Natahn

#4 of 8 OFFLINE   Peter Apruzzese

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Posted November 12 2001 - 04:04 AM

Yes, film collecting is not cheap or for the casual hobbyist. But there is *nothing* like seeing a breathtaking 35mm presentation on a screen - we ran the 1952 classic "Ivanhoe" the other night in gorgeous IB Technicolor. I've seen the film before on television and LaserDisc, but it never made much impact on me; seeing it projected was a revelation.
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#5 of 8 OFFLINE   Jeff Kleist

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Posted November 12 2001 - 04:45 AM

You'd also need at least $50,000 for the lowest-end 35mm projector Posted Image

Jeff Kleist

#6 of 8 OFFLINE   Peter Apruzzese

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Posted November 12 2001 - 05:51 AM

Jeff, that's only if you need to buy brand-new; most collectors don't. You can buy a used Simplex or Century for under $1000, then you need to add a lamphouse for another grand or so. Then basic amplification for mono sound. If you want Dolby Stereo or DTS or Dolby Digital, then you're adding in another $5000 or so. Older projectors are fine as long as you keep them oiled and clean - the ones I personally know of are more than 30 years old and are still running strong. You can do a really nice single-projector 35mm home setup for well under $5000. The prints, though, are another story... Posted Image

[Edited last by Peter Apruzzese on November 12, 2001 at 12:52 PM]
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#7 of 8 OFFLINE   Rob W

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Posted November 13 2001 - 02:29 PM

And you would also have to change reels every 20 minutes which can interrupt the flow of a good movie....

and isolate the projector in a separate room / booth to prevent the machine noise from destroying your audio experience...

although those of us who used to have home theatre via 8mm, 16mm or 35mm will never forget the thrill of watching actual celluloid at home, pre-video!

#8 of 8 OFFLINE   Peter Apruzzese

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Posted November 13 2001 - 03:57 PM

Simple - get two projectors and do changeovers! Or, splice 6000' of film together on one reel and run a two-hour show with only one intermission on a single projector. We run 35mm - between all the friends I know who have the setup - 3 or 4 times a week most of the time. (There's one guy in the group who even has a dual-system 3-D set-up which is absolutely amazing!) Nothing beats 35mm for picture quality. Convenience, however, is another story... Posted Image
"What we're fighting for, in the end...we're fighting for each other." - Col. Joshua Chamberlain in "Gettysburg"

 





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