Jump to content



Sign up for a free account to remove the pop-up ads

Signing up for an account is fast and free. As a member you can join in the conversation, enter contests and remove the pop-up ads that guests get. Click here to create your free account.

Photo
- - - - -

Third Reich Memorbilia


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
17 replies to this topic

#1 of 18 OFFLINE   Jeff Pryor

Jeff Pryor

    Supporting Actor



  • 654 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 05 2002

Posted July 04 2006 - 05:29 AM

Hey, guys, I've just come into possession of this:
http://www.badongo.com/pic/230789
http://www.badongo.com/pic/230792

I did some research on the Paul Weyersberg & Co. Solingen stamp and found it's circa '41-'45. Probably a K98k Bayonet, but I could be wrong. My question is this: it has some sort of laquer or shellac peeling off the blade and I'd like to clean this dagger up nice. Can anyone offer some input? Thanks!
Heads I win, tails you lose.

#2 of 18 OFFLINE   CRyan

CRyan

    Screenwriter



  • 1,244 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 09 1999

Posted July 04 2006 - 06:13 AM

Interesting. Very cool. We have an ivory handled officers knife with scabbard complete with tassel.

Do you know about what these are worth? I have no idea.

Anyway, I would do a lot of research before touching it. I have not taken the time so I have left ours alone. Don't want to ruin the vlaue (if any) to make it look pretty!

#3 of 18 OFFLINE   Jeff Pryor

Jeff Pryor

    Supporting Actor



  • 654 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 05 2002

Posted July 04 2006 - 08:36 AM

There's also some minor rust along a small segment of the edge near the tip. I would like to get rid of that as soon as possible.
Heads I win, tails you lose.

#4 of 18 OFFLINE   Kevin T

Kevin T

    Screenwriter



  • 1,407 posts
  • Join Date: Jul 12 2001

Posted July 04 2006 - 08:54 AM

looks more like a dagger than a bayonet from the pix. as far as cleaning and value, i really wouldn't even know where to begin. my guess would be to a local gun store or military surplus store and ask the owner about cleaning services for antique weaponry.

kevin t
religion is the opiate of the masses

#5 of 18 OFFLINE   Carl Miller

Carl Miller

    Screenwriter



  • 1,461 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 17 2002

Posted July 04 2006 - 11:35 AM

I'm semi-embarassed to admit this, but my wife and I watch Antiques Road Show frequently, and the appraisers always point out instances where item owners cleaned the items or tried to restore them on their own and how this always decreases the value of the item.

If this stuff you got has any significant value, have it cleaned by a professional.
Carl

#6 of 18 OFFLINE   Bob Graz

Bob Graz

    Supporting Actor



  • 798 posts
  • Join Date: Sep 26 2002

Posted July 04 2006 - 02:48 PM

I love Antiques Road Show.

#7 of 18 OFFLINE   Dennis Nicholls

Dennis Nicholls

    Lead Actor



  • 7,829 posts
  • Join Date: Oct 05 1998
  • Real Name:Dennis
  • LocationBoise, ID

Posted July 04 2006 - 03:03 PM

That's not a bayonet. It's some kind of dagger. It really looks fake to me.

A German bayonet of that age should have a sliding mount to snap onto the muzzle end of a Mauser K98k. Plus the "frog" i.e. belt loop should connect via a rivet on the side of the scabbard.

Go do some digging at http://p102.ezboard.....firearmsforums . The people that post there are very knowlegeable about WWI and WWII firearms and bayonets.
Feline videophiles Condoleezza and Dukie.


#8 of 18 OFFLINE   Dennis Nicholls

Dennis Nicholls

    Lead Actor



  • 7,829 posts
  • Join Date: Oct 05 1998
  • Real Name:Dennis
  • LocationBoise, ID

Posted July 04 2006 - 03:21 PM

Here's what a bayonet of the period should look like:

Posted Image

Note the hilt has a ring for slipping over the muzzle, and the scabbard has a rivet-thingie for hooking to the frog.
Feline videophiles Condoleezza and Dukie.


#9 of 18 OFFLINE   Dennis Nicholls

Dennis Nicholls

    Lead Actor



  • 7,829 posts
  • Join Date: Oct 05 1998
  • Real Name:Dennis
  • LocationBoise, ID

Posted July 04 2006 - 03:26 PM

Hint...most of the WWII vintage German weapons didn't have big swastikas on them. For example, I have two Mauser rifles of WWII vintage. They should only have 3 tiny eagle-holding-swastika stamped proof marks along the right hand side of the receiver.
Feline videophiles Condoleezza and Dukie.


#10 of 18 OFFLINE   Garrett Lundy

Garrett Lundy

    Producer



  • 3,764 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 05 2002

Posted July 05 2006 - 01:23 AM

Thanks to the almighty Google, I was able to find..... (courtesy of germandressdaggers.com
Posted Image
You appear to have a RBL 'knife'. The 'dagger' model is the one on the left, I'm not sure what the status difference was...

The RBL knife of 1936-1938 had an 8-pointed star on its handle with the 'RBL' initials in the middle. 1938-1942 remodel replaced the RBL star with a simple swastika. Your's is a later model.
BUT The crossguard eagle should be holding a wreath/swastika with its feet. Your's does not. I would check carefully for signs that your model has been saw or broken for some reason. If it has been sawed, its probably not worth much. If its a reproduction (and they left off the crossguard swastika), its probably not worth much.
Quote:
Organisation Information - German Air Protection Federation [Reichsluftschutzbund (RLB)]



The Reich Air Ministry established the RLB in April 1923, from the existing Deutches Luftschutzverband (German Air Protection League) by Hermann Goring's declaration that the RLB was to be the official air raid protection service of the state.

The primary mission assigned to the RLB was to protect the cities and population from hostile attacks. This group was also charged with training the civilian population in civil defence subjects and air raid precautions. With the exception of a small cadre of career officers, the remainder of the force was composed of volunteers similar to the U.S. Civil Defence Corps.

The RLB was subdivided into two separate formations:

1)… the Luftschutz (Air Raid Protection)

2)… the Warndienst (Air Raid Warning Service). After 1943, the Warndiest became a part of the German Order Police although it still functioned as the Air Raid Warning Service of the Reich.

By 1939 over 15 million men had joined the RLB as volunteers. Volunteers had to purchase their own steel helmets and had no uniform. These volunteers mainly managed the air raid shelters on a street by street basis. The small cadre of career officers carried out training and management of the volunteer force.

As the war progressed the role of the RLB was expanded to include search and rescue, fire fighting, decontamination, damaged building demolition etc.

"Did you know that more people are murdered at 92 degrees Fahrenheit than any other temperature? I read an article once. Lower temperatures, people are easy-going, over 92 and it's too hot to move, but just 92, people get irritable."

#11 of 18 OFFLINE   ChristopherDAC

ChristopherDAC

    Producer



  • 3,729 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 18 2004

Posted July 05 2006 - 02:21 AM

I thought that looked like one of Hermann Goering's stupid props. It's got that theatrical look one associates with the inventor of rubber medals to wear in the bathtub…

#12 of 18 OFFLINE   Jeff Pryor

Jeff Pryor

    Supporting Actor



  • 654 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 05 2002

Posted July 05 2006 - 09:38 AM

Thanks for the link, Dennis. I'll check it out.

BTW, there are no obvious signs that anything has been sawed off this dagger. Considering that I found this item in the possessions of a deceased WWII vet who flew over Germany many times in the B-17 Liberty Run, I would hate to be disappointed to discover this item might be a replica.
Heads I win, tails you lose.

#13 of 18 OFFLINE   MarkHastings

MarkHastings

    Executive Producer



  • 12,013 posts
  • Join Date: Jan 27 2003

Posted July 05 2006 - 09:48 AM

Oh man, considering the rust on the blade, how creepy is it to think about what this knife may have done.

There's just something so very cool/creepy about that.

#14 of 18 OFFLINE   Michael Warner

Michael Warner

    Supporting Actor



  • 742 posts
  • Join Date: Sep 24 1999

Posted July 05 2006 - 11:30 AM

When I was a teenager I inherited some WWII stuff from my uncle. I have a nice Japanese rifle that I still have on display (it was a post-war purchase of his and not a war trophy). I also found myself in possession of a few reams of Third Reich letterhead. For some reason having that paper gave me the willies as it spoke to the brutal efficiency of that regime. I wound up burning it all. Weird that the weapon caused no such feelings -- just the piles of blank paper.
Xbox Live: mugwumps

#15 of 18 OFFLINE   ChristopherDAC

ChristopherDAC

    Producer



  • 3,729 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 18 2004

Posted July 05 2006 - 01:07 PM

What was the evidence at Nuremberg? Mostly paper. Reams and reams, books and books, filing cabinet upon filing cabinet, minutely detailing the most monstrous criminal conspiracy ever brought before a court of law. Everything was documented, everything was minuted, everything was set out quite clearly, showing how calmly and methodically they plunged the world into war and arranged the murder of millions, in a kind of monstrously well-managed business enterprise.

I can understand why that paper would make you shudder, in a way that a weapon would not. At least, in order to shoot a man, you have to look at him and recognise him as an individual, a person.

#16 of 18 OFFLINE   Garrett Lundy

Garrett Lundy

    Producer



  • 3,764 posts
  • Join Date: Mar 05 2002

Posted July 05 2006 - 01:16 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Pryor
Considering that I found this item in the possessions of a deceased WWII vet who flew over Germany many times in the B-17 Liberty Run, I would hate to be disappointed to discover this item might be a replica.
There is also the possability that the knife's original owner, while German, was not sympathetic to the regime and he (or she) removed it themselves.

The RBL does have a distinctive crossguard not shared with any other German WW2 knife, and its pommel is also uncommon (similar only to a particular Air Service type).

Or maybe you have a super rare prototype that worth thousands. Posted Image
"Did you know that more people are murdered at 92 degrees Fahrenheit than any other temperature? I read an article once. Lower temperatures, people are easy-going, over 92 and it's too hot to move, but just 92, people get irritable."

#17 of 18 OFFLINE   ChristopherDAC

ChristopherDAC

    Producer



  • 3,729 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 18 2004

Posted July 05 2006 - 02:24 PM

There is something odd about it, since the swastika on the handle is missing the "glory" behind it on the examples shown above, and is square-on rather than diagonally oriented as Nazi swastika emblems always are. On the other hand, the blade markings wouldn't belong on anything except the genuine article. If you look, you can see the notch where the division of the eagle's legs ought to begin, but they just aren't there.

Perhaps it was damaged and then remade?

#18 of 18 OFFLINE   stoneman1943

stoneman1943

    Auditioning



  • 1 posts
  • Join Date: Apr 25 2010

Posted April 25 2010 - 02:53 PM

Hello all, I'm new here. I found this thread based on a Yahoo search on German memorabilia. My father was a Merchant Marine during the Second World War, these are items that he somehow acquired during his travels. Any info you can pass on as to their value, etc, would certainly be appreciated.../../image/id/89434/width/1000/height/500">








Forum Nav Content I Follow