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Somewhat easy plumbing question


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#1 of 6 Jay H

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Posted April 18 2006 - 02:06 AM

When we're talking about copper, pvc, piping, when it is refered to as say 3/8" piping, is that usually an inner diameter or an outer diameter.

Bought a simply little stop valve for the water line to my inline water filter feeding my refridgerator's water spout. My filter uses 3/8" food grade plastic lines from the main water supply. I bought a 3/8" inline check valve so I can stop the water without turning off the main water line. I hope they fit cause I haven't tried it yet.

Which brings me to the question of the normal method of describing plumbing lines and stuff. Is it usually the I.D. or the O.D.?

Jay
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#2 of 6 brentl

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Posted April 18 2006 - 02:59 AM

I'm not going to be much help here, but I'd think it would be ID because the outer wall thickness can vary based on material.

Brent

#3 of 6 Jay H

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Posted April 24 2006 - 01:32 AM

Turns out after I cut the plastic line, the O.D. of the plastic line is more like 1/2" whereas the I.D. is about 1/4" Turns out the 3/8" bulb end stopper valve is too big!! This is all just too confusing, why can't the mfgrs simply advertise it and mark whether it's an I.D. or O.D!!! I went back to Lowes and brought the plastic line with me. I could not find a 1/4" bulb end stopper so I actually bought a 1/2" bulb stopper and instead of putting the bulb inside the pipe like it's supposed to, I put the pipe inside the bulb which works OK. The water pressure doesn't seem that great and no leaks so far.

Jay
You are the crispy noodle in the vegetarian salad of life

#4 of 6 Mike Wladyka

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Posted April 24 2006 - 01:38 AM

Pipe Size


Threaded Fitting


Unthreaded Pipe
Pipe size is the accepted industry designation, not the actual measured size. To determine pipe size, first measure the inside diameter (ID) or outside diameter (OD) of a threaded fitting or the OD of unthreaded pipe, as shown at left. Then, round up the measurement to the closest ID or OD listed in the chart and select the corresponding pipe size. For example, if the fitting ID or OD measures 1-3/16", the next highest ID or OD in the chart is 1-3/8", and the corresponding pipe size is 1".
Threaded Fitting ID or OD 3/8" 1/2" 5/8" 3/4" 1" 1-3/8" 1-5/8" 1-7/8" 2-3/8" 2-7/8" 3-1/2" 4-1/2" ____
Unthreaded Fitting and Pipe OD 1/2" 5/8" 3/4" 1" 1-1/8" 1-3/8" 1-3/4" 2" 2-1/2" 2-7/8" 3-1/2" 4-1/2" 6-3/4"
Pipe Size 1/8" 1/4" 3/8" 1/2" 3/4" 1" 1-1/4" 1-1/2" 2" 2-1/2" 3" 4" 6"



edit: that didn't format right
Now they show you how detergents take out bloodstains, a pretty violent image there. I think if you've got a T-shirt with a bloodstain all over it, maybe laundry isn't your biggest problem. Maybe you should get rid of the body before you do the wash.

#5 of 6 Jay H

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Posted April 24 2006 - 01:50 AM

Problem is that not every pipe, one can measure the ID without cutting it or disconnecting an end. And is there different thicknesses between say copper and iron pipes? plastic PVC? food-grade PVC?

I really need a good metric/English micrometer to measure the OD of these tubes at least. I find I can't trust mfgrs descriptions especially when they don't indicate if it's an OD or ID. Fortunately, I am only 3 miles from a Lowes and HD so it wasn't too much of a pain to simply run out there, exchange the stopper valve and get one that worked...

Jay
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#6 of 6 Matt Stryker

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Posted April 24 2006 - 08:54 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay H
I really need a good metric/English micrometer to measure the OD of these tubes at least.

See if there is a Harbor Freight in your area, and the next time you are there, run by and pick up a pair of their calipers - I think they are only a buck or two, and are excellent for measuring car parts or house stuff before heading out to the stores.