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Does anyone have an Infocus DLP projector?


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#1 of 38 OFFLINE   Parker Clack

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Posted June 07 2001 - 09:55 AM

I am seriously looking into getting a front projector and I have heard a lot of rave reviews of the Infocus DLP projectors.

For those of you that are using these projectors what do you think of them and what would you use for your HT?

Thanks,
Parker

"I tried to get my medical records from the company but they say they

are confidential and can only be released to other insurance companies,

pharmaceutical​ reps, suppliers of medical equipment and for some

reason the RNC."
 


#2 of 38 OFFLINE   Colin Dunn

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Posted June 07 2001 - 10:07 AM


I think the current breed of DLP projectors is overpriced. Most of them have street prices in the high $3000s to low $4000s and offer XGA (1024x768) resolution.

With the current close-out deals and rebate coupons, it's possible to get a Sony 10HT for more like $4,500-$5,000. The 10HT is widely considered to be better for video applications than a DLP data projector. The 10HT is a native 16:9 projector and has an SXGA resolution (1366x768). It can display 720p HDTV natively (1280x720).

Digital projection (LCD or DLP) is well-suited to 16:9. You can windowbox 4:3 material without fearing "burn-in" or uneven CRT wear, unlike the RPTV consoles.

The LCD panels on the 10HT do have more of a "screen door" effect than a DLP, but the higher resolution makes up for that somewhat. The 10HT also can be tweaked to improve its black levels and color rendition.

DLPs benchmark better for contrast, but some InFocus offerings negate the improved contrast and black levels by allowing stray light to spill out the front of the projector and wash out the on-screen image.

On a 3-panel LCD, you can calibrate color. This is not possible on a 1-chip DLP because it uses a "color wheel" to add color to each projected pixel. The colors on that wheel are fixed and cannot be changed by the end user. I have yet to read of any aftermarket replacements for that wheel that improve the color rendition in video applications. That said, some subjectively prefer the color on DLP, due to the wider contrast (provided light spillage is controlled).

The 10HT was designed with HT in mind, and likely has a better video scaler than the InFocus.

I'd recommend the InFocus if you can get it for under $3,500. But if the going rate is closer to $4K-$5K, I say spring for the Sony instead...


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Colin Dunn
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#3 of 38 OFFLINE   Parker Clack

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Posted June 07 2001 - 10:43 AM

Colin:

Yeah, I know about the 10HT. RAF has one. I have seen my cousins. Costco has the Toshiba TDP-S2 projector (same as InFocus LP-340) for $2500. It has 800 x 600 with DVI inputs and HiDef. It has a 1300 lumens and 400:1 contrast. I also has a 2,000 hour bulb.

I would pick up a 10HT in a heart beat for $2,500 but at nearly $5,000 it is still too pricey for me.

Parker


"I tried to get my medical records from the company but they say they

are confidential and can only be released to other insurance companies,

pharmaceutical​ reps, suppliers of medical equipment and for some

reason the RNC."
 


#4 of 38 OFFLINE   Parker Clack

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Posted June 07 2001 - 10:55 AM

Colin:

One other thing. You say with the "color wheel" that the color is fixed. So are you saying that I wouldn't be able to the use the color bars on AVIA to adjust the colors on this projector?

Here are the states on the Toshiba DLP:

Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology by Texas Instruments
True SVGA, 800 x 600 resolution
Aspect ratio: 4:3
Contrast ratio: 400:1
Brightness: 1,300 ANSI lumens (typical)
Displayable color palette: 16.7 million colors
Projection lens: 1.25:1 manual zoom lens
Projection angle: 11°
Light source: 270-watt SHP lamp (2,000 hour average minimum lamp life)
Data compatibility: XGA (compressed), SVGA, VGA and Macintosh
Video compatibility:
Full NTSC, NTSC 4.43, PAL and SECAM
1080I, 720p HDTV video support
1 x 2.5 watt built-in audio system
Onboard, hard-cap micro-switch control panel
Wireless remote control
Input connectors:
VESA® DVI digital/analog connector with USB
RGB (second computer data input)
Composite video
S-video
Audio
Image configuration:
Plug-and project auto synchronization
Auto tracking
Auto positioning
Auto source detect
Auto black/white level detect
Proportional Digital Keystone Correction (DKC)
Accessories: Soft travel case, DVI analog cable, composite video cable, audio connection cable, composite video cable, Apple® Macintosh adapter and wireless remote control/mouse
Power consumption: 350 watts
Power supply: 100 – 1120VAC, 200 – 240VAC at 50 – 60 Hz
Dimensions: 10.9" W x 11.2" D x 3.9" H
Weight: 6.7 lbs.
Two-year limited parts and labor warranty and a 90-day warranty on projection lamp


I am a novice at this stuff and want to know more. I know about AVScience but their board is down at the moment. Also, I would prefer to stick to my own site. Posted Image

Parker

"I tried to get my medical records from the company but they say they

are confidential and can only be released to other insurance companies,

pharmaceutical​ reps, suppliers of medical equipment and for some

reason the RNC."
 


#5 of 38 OFFLINE   Chip_Slattery

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Posted June 07 2001 - 01:14 PM

Parker,

If you're truly interested in InFocus, you may want to visit the following site: (if you haven't already)
http://www.infocushome.com

InFocus is going to be announcing a couple of new projectors that have been developed specifically for home theater. From what I've read on that "other" board that you mentioned these projectors are going to set new standards for price/performance as far as projectors are concerned. You may want to hop over there and do a quick search...

Chip
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#6 of 38 OFFLINE   Colin Dunn

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Posted June 07 2001 - 02:05 PM


If you can get an SXGA-class DLP for $2,500-$3,000, that's a good enough price for me to recommend it. The last time I looked (admittedly a few months ago), street prices were more like $4,000 (but 10HTs were pushing $6K back then, too).

$2,500 for an SVGA-class DLP (like the Toshiba) is an average - not great - deal. In that price range, I'd probably be more excited about the 65" Toshiba RPTVs selling for around $2,800.

That 800x600 resolution is good enough for non-anamorphic DVD. It won't do full resolution with anamorphic DVD unless you buy an aftermarket anamorphic lens (which costs an additional $600-$1,500). If you do downconversion, you won't get 480 pixels of vertical resolution.

If you're willing to sacrifice anamorphic/HDTV resolution, that kind of projector still will provide a huge picture with lots of impact - just at the expense of resolution.

I used to have an SVGA-class (800x600) DLP projector (nView D455Z), before it got "performance anxiety" and died 15 minutes before a Home Theater Meet. Posted Image There were no color/tint adjustments. It only had brightness and contrast. Fortunately, the color wheel on that projector was pretty accurate. You may want to look at reviews and see how the projector stacks up for color accuracy, as you may not have any adjustment for it. If you get to see the projector first-hand, look in the setup menus for your picture adjustments.

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#7 of 38 OFFLINE   Parker Clack

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Posted June 07 2001 - 02:55 PM

Chip:

I added my name to their mailing this for their up coming DLP projectors set up for the home market. Thanks for the tip.

Colin:

Thanks for the information. Resolution is a priority for me so it doesn't look like this projector would do the trick.

Parker

"I tried to get my medical records from the company but they say they

are confidential and can only be released to other insurance companies,

pharmaceutical​ reps, suppliers of medical equipment and for some

reason the RNC."
 


#8 of 38 OFFLINE   Parker Clack

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Posted June 07 2001 - 06:14 PM

Looks to me like TI has developed a way to put all three colors on a single DMD at the same time instead of one at a time and that future DLP projectors will have not only more light output but even better color saturation.

I will be interested in seeing what the new Infocus DLP projectors built for the home market are about. It sounds like they will have native 16x9 panels at least.

Looks like September though. The new Sony 11HT sounds interesting too.

Parker


"I tried to get my medical records from the company but they say they

are confidential and can only be released to other insurance companies,

pharmaceutical​ reps, suppliers of medical equipment and for some

reason the RNC."
 


#9 of 38 OFFLINE   Scott Dautel

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Posted June 08 2001 - 02:53 AM

Parker:

I've been looking into DLP Projectors for almost a year. I've compared endlessly between DLP & LCD and decided DLP at 1024 x 768 (XGA) resolution is the way I would go today for my personal home use. I'm just waiting for the right deal.

My best experience came a few months ago, when my company gave me $10K to buy 2 DLP projectors for presentation use. I bought the following:

InFocus LP350 (1300 lumens, 4:3 XGA resolution)
Proxima Ultralight DX3 (1100 lumens, 4:3 XGA resolution)

I've tried them both with my portable Pioneer PDV-LC10 DVD player and s-video connection. They are both incredible and, in my opinion, beat the Sony 10HT (though I never did a side-by-side). The InFocus wins slightly due to the superior video scaler / line doubler. I have two minor complaints with the inFocus LP350 as follows:

1) light does leak out the front ( I would position it behind a panel (ventilated) with only the lens peeking thru)
2) Keystone correction is disabled in video mode. (this means you'll have to permanently position the unit at the geometric center of your screen ... you'll get some keystone distortion if using it from a tabletop or ceiling)

However, if my source was HTPC, I would actually prefer the Proxima DX3 (just replaced by the Proxima X350), which has neither of the two aforementioned problems

The LP350 is widely available for $4,200., I saw a reconditioned one yesterday for $3,600. (I paid $4,500 in Feb.) When you consider cost, understand that bulb life is approx. 2000 hours and replacement bulbs run $350-$400. That's about $0.25 per hour now.

For a quick education, go to www.projectorcentral.com and read this article --> InFocus LP350 vs. Plus U2-1130

Is there any reason to wait? GREAT Question ... I would think someone should create a DLP projector with a 16:9 chip (ala Sony 10HT) and design an HT projector around it. This week, I discovered that Sharp has done just that and they showed it at CES back in Jan. Here's the PR --> Sharp unveils XV-Z9000U . They said this would be released in August, but this week, they deleted references to it on their website ... whats up? Could it be that Sharp has encountered problems. I also read over at DVDFile.com CES Report that Sharps projected pricing for this unit was $10K - $12K ... Ridiculous and VERY disappointing.

By the way ... Panasonic has an incredible 52" RPTV with the first 16:9 DLP chip projector on the market already ... you can test drive it at any Panny Dealer --> Panasonic PT-52DL10 Once again, MSRP = $12K. I can't imagine why anyone would want to lug this beast into their house, when a portable projector (costing 65% less) weighs 3-5 lbs, fits in your briefcase, and can project much larger than 52".

Scott

#10 of 38 OFFLINE   Brian King

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Posted June 08 2001 - 03:22 AM

Parker, I used to work for TI here in Versailles, KY (until they closed their doors last year. Now I work for Lexmark. Anywho.......

We had several Infocus DLP's in the plant. 2 were portable and the 3rd was mounted in our conference room. By far, I'd have to say these were the cleanest, brightest and crispiest images I had ever seen from a FP! I wasn't big in the HT arena back then, so I can't give you any specifics. I used to set up the portables in our conference rooms and they were a snap. The mounted one shined on a 12' wide screen in 4:3 and was about 15' from the screen. The room was about 20X40 with light zones and even with all the lights off, the picture from the projector would light up the room! I was VERY impressed.

Like I said...I didn't check out the technical aspects when I was there, but from Joe-Six-Pack, this was MILES above the other projectors. Use the technical info and compare it with the real life experiences and see what you come up with! On a side note, I found these devices to be REALLY quite compared to their counterparts.

Just my $.02

Good Luck!

Brian King

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#11 of 38 OFFLINE   Vince Maskeeper

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Posted June 08 2001 - 04:39 AM

Parker,

While I hesitate to point you anywhere but your own forum to find info- I would say if you're really interested in getting the skinny on FPTV systems, check out AVS forum:
www.avsforum.com

Good info- do a search and you could read all day!

-Vince

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#12 of 38 OFFLINE   KeithR

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Posted June 08 2001 - 06:56 AM

Parker,

The "hot" dlp is the NEC 150...can be had for 3200 bucks. That with a prog. scan dvd and screen is supposedly amazing. I am going to see this exact setup on tuesday. There is a thread vs. the Infocus 350 on avsforum.com

About the Sony....this unit I feel isn't very good and is outdated. Sure it has 16:9 panels, but the contrast and black levels were abyssmal at two demos I saw. You can always order a panamorph lens and have the best of both worlds (4:3 and 16:9). Don't forget all the dead/misfiring pixels and dust blobs that make LCD unpopular. DLPs are lighter, and can have just as good colors. The rainbow effect is a problem for some however....


Size is everything, and I wish others on this board would look to FPs, like the cheaper presenation DLPs and LCDs vs. 65" rptvs. Of course, ambient light is bad with fps, and rptvs I find.

Keith

#13 of 38 OFFLINE   KeithR

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Posted June 08 2001 - 07:00 AM

Oh yeah, the Sharp 16:9 will be priced list at $15k (from my dealer).

The Sanyo PLV-60 is native 16:9, and is superior to the 10HT from all reports---however is does cost 2k more. If you want the 10HT, i know where you can get it for $4k after rebate. Email me...

#14 of 38 OFFLINE   Parker Clack

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Posted June 08 2001 - 08:17 PM

Vince:

I know know David and the gang at AVS well. David and I have talked over the years many times. Thanks for the suggestion though. I think they have THE best site on the net for getting information on projection televisions but I wanted to get a conversation here going instead of having to wade through all the posts.

Keith:

You will have to post here what that set up looks like. I am interested in seeing what the new Infocus units that are made for HT look like. As the ones that most people use are made for presentations. These units are supposed to have the newer 16:9 DMD in them. And maybe even a 6 color wheel. We will have to see. I also like the fact that the Infocus units have a central station that you can plug all your inputs into and have one line coming off of it to your projector instead of having to have multiple lines into the back of the set.

Parker

"I tried to get my medical records from the company but they say they

are confidential and can only be released to other insurance companies,

pharmaceutical​ reps, suppliers of medical equipment and for some

reason the RNC."
 


#15 of 38 OFFLINE   Luis Gabriel Gerena

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Posted June 09 2001 - 12:34 AM

In your price range you can get an older Sony VPL-W400Q, from MVS for example, and you won't have to deal with screendoor effect nor the rainbow effect of DLP (1chip). It also has a lot more Resolution than the Toshiba your are looking at and it has 16:9 native panels. It is also HDTV capable. I am sitting at 11' from a 8' wide screen and no screendoor or pixels at all. The black levels are as good (or as bad) as any LCD/DLP based projector so don't let anyone confuse you with that. About the 10HT having bad black levels...its all about tweaking. Never judge gear based on poor demos...try it yourself at your place. Also, if you don't have a pitch black enviroment then I won't recommend the 400W cause it has low lumen output.
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#16 of 38 OFFLINE   Joseph Bolus

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Posted June 09 2001 - 08:42 AM

I'd like to take a stab at this.

I currently own a Phillips "Hopper" Projector; the SV20i.

This is a SVGA 1200 lumen, 200:1 contrast ratio projector with a 3-panel, 4:3 LCD design.

In spite of these very modest specs, I've found the black level to be adequate when used with a Stewart "GrayHawk" screen. This screen also hides the "pincushion effect" that is endemic to LCD projectors.

I only paid $2500 for this projector new, but thanks to the "Grayhawk", I'm able to obtain a very satisfactory video experience.

Don't overlook the benefits of utilizing a screen optimized for LCD projectors. This could allow you to "get your feet wet" with a relatively inexpensive LCD projector (which has the benefit over DLP of providing deeper and adjustable colors.)

Once the new Infocus 16:9 DLP projectors are ready, you could upgrade to one of those (if you deem them to be worthy enough) and still use the GrayHawk for your new DLP; and you would have no problem selling your SV20i (or comparable) at that point.

BTW, although I've seen no discussion of this projector on any of the boards, it actually contains a "good enough" line-doubler/scaler for interlaced DVD fed through the S-VIDEO input, and provides 16:9 support for anamorphic DVD (by "carving-out" a Widescreen area from within the 4:3 LCD panels.)

It's a fun, "get-your-feet-wet" projector!

Joseph



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#17 of 38 OFFLINE   KeithR

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Posted June 09 2001 - 11:09 AM

Parker,

I am interested in the Infocus HT projector too...and what price point they come at. We should know a lot more after Infocomm this week....I am looking to buy a projector soon, but definitely am waiting to hear the scoop during Infocomm...Sony 11HT, Infocus HT, and others will be shown. The problem with projectors lately, is that they are outdated very soon. That is why I may go for the NEC with an HTPC from AVS. The HTPC is always upgradable, and then I can get a 16:9 projector in a year or two, when DLP will be way ahead of LCD i feel.

Keith

#18 of 38 OFFLINE   Parker Clack

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Posted June 09 2001 - 03:01 PM

Keith:

Are you going to be going to Infocomm this year then? If you do get to go you need to report back here on your findings.

Parker

"I tried to get my medical records from the company but they say they

are confidential and can only be released to other insurance companies,

pharmaceutical​ reps, suppliers of medical equipment and for some

reason the RNC."
 


#19 of 38 OFFLINE   Stephen Dodds

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Posted June 09 2001 - 04:15 PM

I've had numerous DLP projectors. Given your budget, the question is whether you want to buy new or used, and if you need HDTV capability.

Bang for buck, your best choice would be a lightly used Plus UP1100 or its clones the NEC LT100 and Proxima DX1. These are XGA machines with good blacks and the ability to take component inputs. Best picture will be with a progressive DVD or an iScan (even better with HTPC).

To further improve the image, a guy called 'Thumper' over at AVS does modifications which make the blacks even better and improve color accuracy.

A Thumper modified Plus will give you a picture as good as any current single chip DLP, including the over-priced Runcos.

If you look hard you can get the projector for $1800-$2000. The Thumper mod costs $550 and a used iScan is $250.

New, for about the same price you could get the SVGA InFocus LP340. It has a better scaler so you won't need the iScan, and it is brighter, but the blacks are not as good, the colours not as accurate and the bulbs have a tendency to, how shall I put this, explode.

Quite a few people are happy with this at AVS. Cost is about $2700.

For $3200 you can get the XGA NEC LT150. It will give you a picture as good as the modified Plus UP1100. However, it has no zoom so positioning may be a problem. If you don't need XGA resolution, the SVGA LT85 can be had for about $2400. These will need a progressive player, iScan or whatever.

A real bargain is the Sharp PG-M10S. This is a semi-clone of the NEC LT85 and can be had new for $1800.

For real bargain priced but still good performance, you could try the Plus UP800/NEC LT81/Proxima DS1. These are the SVGA versions of the Plus unit mentioned above and can be had for under $1200 used.

The Sanyo SU07N/Proxima LS1 LCD projectors have a very nice picture and don't need an external scaler, but like most LCD projectors they have poor blacks. Cost is around $1000 used.

I've owned all of these projectors (call me a projector slut).

Plus are also bringing out an HT based projector (the Piano)which given their track record should be worth checking out.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Steve


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#20 of 38 OFFLINE   Joseph Bolus

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Posted June 09 2001 - 05:26 PM

Quote:
I've owned all of these projectors (call me a projector slut).

So, Steve, just out of curiosity, what are you currently running?

And have you totally given up on LCD projectors?

Joseph

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